Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Applied anatomy ulnar nerve injury

After completion of this session, students should be able to discuss, identify, and describe:

The anatomical factors predisposing to nerve injuries.
The anatomy of deformity, weakness and sensory loss following the nerve injury.
The applied anatomy of clinical examination for specific nerves.
Surgical anatomy of treating nerve injuries.

  • Login to see the comments

Applied anatomy ulnar nerve injury

  1. 1. Dr.AkramJaffar Applied Anatomy of Nerve Injuries in the Upper LimbApplied Anatomy of Nerve Injuries in the Upper Limb Ulnar nerveUlnar nerve Akram Jaffar, Ph.D. Subscribe to Human Anatomy Education Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/akramjfr Human Anatomy Education platforms by Akram Jaffar Follow @AkramJaffar Like Human Anatomy Education Page https://www.facebook.com/AnatomyEducation
  2. 2. Dr.AkramJaffar References and suggested reading • Ellis H (2006): Clinical anatomy, A revision and applied anatomy for clinical students. 11th Ed. Blackwell Publishing. Massachusetts • Moore KL & Dalley AF (2006): Clinically oriented anatomy. 5th ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Baltimore • Brust JCM (2007): Current Diagnosis & Treatment in Neurology. 2nd ed. McGraw-Hill Professional.
  3. 3. Dr.AkramJaffar Objectives After completion of this session, students should be able to discuss, identify, and describe: – The anatomical factors predisposing to nerve injuries. – The anatomy of deformity, weakness and sensory loss following the nerve injury. – The applied anatomy of clinical examination for specific nerves. – Surgical anatomy of treating nerve injuries.
  4. 4. Dr.AkramJaffar Ulnar nerve • Arises from the medial cord of the brachial plexus • No branches in the axilla • No branches in the arm. • Passes behind the medial epicondyle to enter the forearm. Palpation of the ulnar nerve behind the medial epicondyle of the humerus
  5. 5. Dr.AkramJaffar Ulnar nerve • Branches in the forearm • Motor: 1 & ½ muscles • Sensory – dorsal cutaneous branch – Palmar cutaneous branch • Testing • Flexion of the wrist on the ulnar side against resistance tests flexor carpi ulnaris • Flexing the distal phalanx of the little finger against resistance tests ulnar side of flexor digitorum profundus dorsal cutaneous branch Palmar cutaneous branch Flex. Carpi ulnaris Flex. Dig. profundus Testing flexor carpi ulnaris Testing flexor digitorum profundus
  6. 6. Dr.AkramJaffar Ulnar nerve • Branches in the palm • Motor: – Hypothenar muscles. – Medial two lumbricals. – Adductor pollicis. – ALL interossei. • Sensory. Ulnar n. Adductor pollicis hypothenar mm. interossei
  7. 7. Dr.AkramJaffar Ulnar nerve • Action of interossei • Palmar ADduct – Dorsal Abduct (PAD & DAB) • Testing: – Palmar interossei: adducting the fingers against a piece of paper – Dorsal interossei: Resisted abduction of fingers. • Action of interossei and lumbricals: – Flexion of metacarpo- phalangeal joints and Extension of inter- phalangeal joints. – Act through the extensor expansion. Testing palmar interossei Testing dorsal interossei
  8. 8. Dr.AkramJaffar Ulnar nerve injury • Common sites of injury • At the elbow – Cubital tunnel syndrome: repetitive minor trauma of the ulnar nerve behind the medial epicondyle. – Treatment: anterior transposition of the ulnar nerve.
  9. 9. Dr.AkramJaffar Ulnar nerve injury • Common sites of injury • At the elbow – Fracture or dislocation – Improper positioning of the arm on the operating table • At the wrist – Stab wound Medial epicondyle fracture Dislocation of the elbow
  10. 10. Dr.AkramJaffar Ulnar nerve injury • Common sites of injury • Guyon's canal syndrome • Entrapment of the ulnar nerve as it passes through a tunnel in the wrist between the pisiform and hamate and the ligament that connects them (Guyon's canal). • Similar to carpal tunnel syndrome but involves the ulnar nerve. • Fracture of the hook of the hamate.
  11. 11. Dr.AkramJaffar Ulnar nerve injury • Claw hand • Paralysis of the interosseous muscles  extension of the metacarpophalangeal joints and flexion of the interphalangeal joints which is most prominent in the fifth and fourth fingers whose lumbricals are also supplied by the ulnar nerve. • Atrophy of the interossei.

×