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Designing for real world participation and social interaction

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Andrew Barrie's presentation on designing multi-user experiences for UX Australia 2016.

Published in: Design
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Designing for real world participation and social interaction

  1. 1. DESIGNING FOR REAL- WORLD PARTICIPATION AND SOCIAL INTERACTION Image courtesy of Simon and Tom Bloor
  2. 2. ANDREW BARRIE INTERACTION DESIGN LEAD - FJORD @_andrewbarrie
  3. 3. WHAT DO WE MEAN BY REAL-WORLD PARTICIPATION AND SOCIAL INTERACTION?
  4. 4. DESIGN THAT FACILITATES COLLABORATION BETWEEN PEOPLE IN PHYSICAL SPACE VIA DIGITAL MEANS.
  5. 5. TECHNOLOGIES THAT ENABLE MULTI-USER EXPERIENCES. Image courtesy of Lightwell
  6. 6. INTERFACES THAT ENCOURAGE SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT AND PLAY. Image courtesy of Philip Worthington
  7. 7. WHY IS IT USEFUL TO TALK ABOUT THIS NOW?
  8. 8. CURRENT BLURRING OF DIGITAL AND PHYSICAL BOUNDARIES. Image courtesy of screenrant.com
  9. 9. ZERO UI AND UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING
  10. 10. SO, WHAT DO I KNOW?
  11. 11. AMP SPARK CONCEPT STORE - WHAT IF? WALL
  12. 12. Image courtesy of UDKU/AMP
  13. 13. WHAT DOES IT DO? • Simple tool for selecting and prioritising life goals. • Designed to help facilitate conversation between customers and financial advisors. • Full IR-based multitouch interface. Supports multiple users/touches at the same. • 5 x 2.5m wall mounted installation
  14. 14. WHAT DID I LEARN? • Be contextually aware. Don’t assume that people want their inputs and from one context shared in another. • Test performance anxieties carefully, especially with males! • Default or dwell states are the best opportunity for educating your user.
  15. 15. SCIENCEWORKS - SUPER FUTURE YOU
  16. 16. WHAT DOES IT DO? • AR-based interactive designed to give a visitors a fun introduction to hypothetical body augmentations. • Uses a Kinect camera to track the users position and geometry. • 3D models are superimposed on the visitor in real-time. • Generates a GIF on-the-fly that visitors can email post the experience.
  17. 17. WHAT DID I LEARN? • Kids are brutal. This makes them fantastic usability testers. • If you are designing a social experience, test it as a social experience (with realistic proportions of potential users). • Designers need to sweat the system performance, especially when there are multiple touch-points distributed across the same network.
  18. 18. WHAT ELSE CAN WE LEARN FROM THIS TYPE OF WORK?
  19. 19. PAPER PROTOTYPES CAN BE A RISKY ABSTRACTION. START DESIGNING IN CODE.
  20. 20. Image courtesy of UDKU/AMP
  21. 21. IF YOU WANT PEOPLE TO PARTICIPATE, DESIGN FOR THE SPECTATOR. Image courtesy of Yoshi Omori
  22. 22. THE 90-9-1 RULE 1% HEAVY CONTRIBUTORS 9% INTERMITTENT CONTRIBUTORS 90% LURKERS (Neilson Norman Group, 2006)
  23. 23. THE 60-30-10 RULE 10% ACTIVE PARTICIPANTS 30% ACTIVE SPECTATORS 60% LURKERS (My educated guess, 2016)
  24. 24. WE NEED TO KEEP LEARNING FROM OTHER DESIGN DISCIPLINES.
  25. 25. Diagram courtesy of Diller, Scofidio and Renfro
  26. 26. EXPERIMENTAL AND R&D TODAY, INDUSTRIALISED TOMORROW. Image courtesy of NASA
  27. 27. THANKS… ANY QUESTIONS?

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