Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

of

NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 1 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 2 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 3 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 4 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 5 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 6 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 7 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 8 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 9 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 10 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 11 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 12 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 13 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 14 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 15 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 16 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 17 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 18 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 19 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 20 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 21 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 22 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 23 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 24 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 25 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 26 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 27 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 28 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 29 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 30 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 31 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 32 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 33 NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES  Slide 34
Upcoming SlideShare
What to Upload to SlideShare
Next
Download to read offline and view in fullscreen.

27 Likes

Share

Download to read offline

NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES

Download to read offline

NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES BY. MR. DINABANDHU BARAD

Related Books

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES

  1. 1. NEWBORN REFLEXES BY: Mr. Dinabandhu Barad MSC TUTOR, SNC,SOA,DTU
  2. 2. WHAT IS A REFLEX ? • A reflex is an involuntary, or automatic, action that the body does in response to stimulation, without awareness. • Neonatal reflexes or primitive reflexes are the inborn behavioral patterns that develop during uterinelife. • They should be fully present at birth and are gradually inhibited by higher centers in the brain during postnatallife.
  3. 3. TYPES OF REFLEXES
  4. 4. TYPES OF REFLEXES 1. GENERAL BODY REFLEX 2. FACIAL REFLEX 3. ORAL REFLEX
  5. 5.  Moro reflex/Startle reflex  Palmar/grasp reflex  Plantar graspreflex  Walking/stepping reflex  Asymmetric tonic neck reflex  Symmetric tonic neck reflex  Babinski’s reflex GENERAL BODY REFLEXES  Babkin reflex  Parachute reflex  Gallant’s reflex
  6. 6.  Blink reflex  Doll’s eye reflex  Auditory orienting reflex FACIAL REFLEXES
  7. 7.  Rooting reflex  Sucking reflex  Swallowing reflex  Gag reflex  Cry reflex ORAL REFLEXES
  8. 8. MORO REFLEX  Begins at 28weeks of gestation  Initiated by any sudden movementof the neck  Elicited by -- pulling the baby halfway to sitting position from supine & suddenly let the head fall back  Consists of rapid abduction & extension of arms with the opening of hands, tensing of the back muscles, flexion of the legs and crying
  9. 9. Clinical significance Its nature gives an indication of muscle tone Failure of the arms to move freely or the hands toopen fully indicates hypotonia. It fades rapidly and is not normally elicited after 6 months of age. MORO REFLEX
  10. 10. PALMAR/GRASP REFLEX  Begins at 32weeks ofgestation  Light touch of the palmproduces reflex flexion of the fingers  Most effective way -- slide the stimulating object, such as afinger or pencil, across the palm fromthe lateral border  Disappears at 3-4months  Replaced by voluntary grasp at45 months
  11. 11. Clinical significance Exceptionally strong grasp reflex -- spastic form of cerebral palsy & Kernicterus May be asymmetrical in hemiplagia & in cases of cerebral damage Persistence beyond 3-4 months indicate spastic form of palsy PALMAR/GRASP REFLEX
  12. 12. PLANTAR/GRASP REFLEX  Placing object or finger beneath the toes causes curling of toes around the object Present at 32weeks ofgestation Disappears at 9-12 months • Clinical significance : This reflex is referred to as the "readiness tester". Integrates at the same time that independent gait first becomes possible.
  13. 13. WALKING/STEPPING REFLEX When sole of foot is pressed against the couch, baby tries to walk Legs prance up & down as if baby is walking or dancing Present at birth, disappearsat approx 2-4 months With daily practice of reflex, infants may walk alone at 10 months CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE Premature infants will tend to walk in a toe-heel fashion while more mature infants will walk in a heel-toe pattern.
  14. 14. ASYMMETRIC TONIC NECK REFLEX Most evident between 2-3months ofage • Clinical significance The reflex fades rapidly and is not normally seen after 6 months of age. Persistence is the most frequently observed abnormality of the infantile reflexes in infants with neurological lesions Greatly disrupts development
  15. 15. SYMMETRIC TONIC NECK REFLEX  Extension of the head causes extension of the fore limbs and flexion of the hind limbs Evident between 2-3months ofage Clinical significance Not normally easily seen or elicitedin normal infants  May be seen in an exaggerated form in many children with cerebral palsy.
  16. 16. BABINSKI’S REFLEX  Stimulus consists of a firm painful stroke along the lateral border of the sole from heel to toe Response consists of movement (flexion or extension) of the big toe and sometimes movement (fanning) of the othertoes Present at birth, disappears at approx9- 10 months Presence of reflex later may indicate disease
  17. 17. BABKIN REFLEX Deep pressure applied simultaneously to the palms of both hands while the infant is in supine position Stimulus is followed by flexion or forward bowing of the head, opening of the mouth and closing of the eyes Fades rapidly and normally cannot be elicited after 4 months of age.
  18. 18. • Clinical significance Reflex can be demonstrated in the newborn, thus showing a hand- mouth neurological link, even at that early stage BABKIN REFLEX
  19. 19. PARACHUTE REFLEX Reflex appears at about 6-9 months & persists thereafter Elicited by holding the child in ventral suspension & suddenly lowering him to the couch Arms extend as a defensivereaction • Clinical significance Absent or abnormal in childrenwith cerebral palsy Would be asymmetrical in spastic hemiplagia
  20. 20. GALLANT’S REFLEX  Firm sharp stimulation along sides of the spine with the fingernails or a pin produces contraction of the underlying muscles and curving of the back. Response is easily seen when the infant is held upright and the trunk movement is unrestricted Best seen in the neonatal period and thereafter gradually fades.
  21. 21. FACIAL REFLEXES
  22. 22. BLINK REFLEX  A bright light suddenly shown into the eyes, a puff ofair upon the sensitive cornea or a sudden loud noise will produce immediate blinking of the eyes Purpose – to protect the eyes from foreign bodies &bright light May be associated tensing of the neck muscles, turning of the head away from the stimulus, frowning and crying  Reflexes are easily seen in the neonate and continue to be present throughout life
  23. 23. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE Examination is a part of some neurological exams, particularly when evaluatingcoma Satisfactory demonstration of these reflexes indicate–  No cerebral depression  Contraction of appropriate muscles in response BLINK REFLEX
  24. 24. DOLL’S EYE REFLEX (OCULOCEPHALIC REFLEX) Passive turning of the head of the newborn leaves the eye “behind” A distinct time lag occurs before the eyes move to a new position in keeping with the head position Disappears at within a weekor two of birth Failure of this reflex to appear indicates a cerebral lesion
  25. 25. AUDITORY ORIENTING REFLEX  A sudden loud and unpleasant noise :  May produce the blink reflex  Infant may remain still and show increased alertness Quieter sounds usually cause reflex eye and head turning tothe side of the sound, as if to locate it Seen first at about 4 months of age Thereafter, head turning towards sound stimuli occurs and the accuracy of localization increases rapidly by 9-10 months
  26. 26. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE  Reflex responses are made use of in tests of infants for hearing loss  Pattern of the localization responses indicates the level of neurological maturity AUDITORY ORIENTING REFLEX
  27. 27. ORAL REFLEXES
  28. 28. Baby’s cheek is stroked :  They respond by turning their head towards the stimulus  They start sucking, thus allowing for breast feeding  When corner of mouth is touched, lower lip is lowered, tongue moves towards the point stimulated  When finger slides away, head turns to follow it  When center of lip is stimulated, lip elevates ROOTING REFLEX
  29. 29. Onset -- 28weeks IU Well established – 32-34weeks IU Disappears – 3-4 months Clinical significance Persistence can interfere with sucking Absence of this is seen in neurologically impaired infants. ROOTING REFLEX
  30. 30. SUCKING / SWALLOWING REFLEX Touching lips or placing something in baby’s mouth causes baby to draw liquid into mouth by creating vacuum with lips, cheeks & tongue Onset – 28weeks IU Well established – 32-34weeks IU Disappears around 12 months
  31. 31. GAG REFLEX (PHARYNGEAL REFLEX) Seen in 19weeks of IU life Reflex contraction of the back of the throat Evoked by touching the roof of the mouth, the back of the tongue, the area around the tonsils and the back of the throat
  32. 32. Functional significance  It, along with reflexive pharyngeal swallowing, prevents something from entering the throat except as part of normal swallowing and helps prevent choking Clinical significance  Absence of the gag reflex -- symptom of a number of severe medical conditions :  Damage to the glossopharyngeal nerve, the vagus nerve,  Brain death. GAG REFLEX (PHARYNGEAL REFLEX)
  33. 33. CRY REFLEX  Non conditioned reflex which accounts for its lack of its individual character  Sporadic in nature  Starts as early as 21-29weeks of IU life
  • SudhaChavali1

    Oct. 29, 2021
  • DrPrateekshaPandey

    Oct. 5, 2021
  • AjayKumar4139

    Sep. 24, 2021
  • HopeCullen2

    Sep. 13, 2021
  • AartiPanchal4

    Jul. 8, 2021
  • PrachiMhaske1

    Jun. 24, 2021
  • Dougdec

    Jun. 2, 2021
  • omParkash74

    May. 28, 2021
  • anujagv2015

    Apr. 4, 2021
  • BhargaviAsetti

    Feb. 2, 2021
  • CincinsokoMenegbe

    Jan. 26, 2021
  • SethHenry6

    Jan. 22, 2021
  • ThasleenaShamin

    Jan. 15, 2021
  • stephanieinahan

    Jan. 15, 2021
  • caseychebet

    Jan. 11, 2021
  • SankeshKumar2

    Jan. 1, 2021
  • TubmanSnawolo

    Nov. 25, 2020
  • irinjohny

    Nov. 19, 2020
  • gopikrishna622

    Nov. 16, 2020
  • NaandaMuyawa

    Nov. 3, 2020

NEWBORN REFLEXES/ PRIMITIVE REFLEXES BY. MR. DINABANDHU BARAD

Views

Total views

587

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

0

Actions

Downloads

35

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

27

×