Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Mind the Gap - What can Passive House Design teach us about closing the building performance gap?

758 views

Published on

Buildings often use 200% more energy than predicted, emit more CO2 than they should and are uncomfortable to occupy. Even 'sustainable' buildings. This is known as the Building Performance Gap. Passive House design has effectively eliminated the gap - so what can we learn from Passive House Design?

Published in: Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Mind the Gap - What can Passive House Design teach us about closing the building performance gap?

  1. 1. Mind the Gap What can Passive House design teach us about closing the building performance gap?
  2. 2. Elrond Burrell UK Registered Architect Certified Passive House Designer VIA-architecture.net
  3. 3. If you don't measure results, you can't tell success from failure David Osborne and Ted Gaebler
  4. 4. Let’s talk about: 1. What is the building performance gap? 2. Why does it matter? 3. Reasons for the gap 4. Passive House design 5. Results
  5. 5. 1. What is ‘the gap’? When building performance in use doesn’t match design predictions 1. Energy Consumption 2. CO2 emissions 3. Health and wellbeing • Comfort • Hygiene • Indoor Air Quality
  6. 6. What is the gap? When building performance in use doesn’t match design predictions 1. Energy Consumption 2. CO2 emissions 3. Health and wellbeing • Comfort • Hygiene • Indoor Air Quality
  7. 7. Health and Wellbeing Comfort • Air temperature, surface temperatures, temperature asymmetry, draught-free, relative humidity Hygiene • Condensation, mould Indoor Air Quality • Fresh air, odours, CO2 levels, moisture
  8. 8. 2. Why does ‘the gap’ matter? People see sustainable design as: • Woolly • Well intentioned, but . . . • Expensive / luxury • An add-on extra • Pointless They are right . . . . . . while there is a performance gap.
  9. 9. Climate Change Is sustainable design mitigating climate change?
  10. 10. Not (much) while there is a performance gap
  11. 11. Close ‘the gap’ and . . . Sustainable design is • Not woolly: clearly defined outcomes • Not just good intentions: delivers on promises • Not luxury: what educated clients demand • Not an add-on: integral to design • Not pointless: relevant AND genuinely helps mitigate climate change
  12. 12. 3. Reasons for ‘the gap’ 1. Design 2. Construction 3. Commissioning 4. Occupation
  13. 13. Design • Designers don’t know the impact of decisions • No modelling • Wrong / unknown modelling assumptions • Wrong assumptions about how people behave • Designs unbuildable
  14. 14. Construction • Drawings / documentation not followed • Changes made during construction • Lack of quality control
  15. 15. Commissioning • Not done • Incomplete • Wrong
  16. 16. Occupation • Complex systems that people don’t know how to use • Not educated in using a building efficiently • Don’t care?
  17. 17. 4. Passive House design • Clear performance requirements • Rigorous non-prescriptive design methodology • Modelling integral to the design process • Design QA • Construction QA • Rigorous 3rd-party verification process • Accountability
  18. 18. A focus on what matters 1. Insulation 2. Airtightness 3. Heat Recovery Ventilation 4. Thermal Bridges 5. Windows & Doors
  19. 19. How Airtight? 4.5Xplus 0.6 ach 5.0 ach
  20. 20. HRV vs Windows 3Xplus Window ventilation only82% efficient HRV
  21. 21. Why is PHPP so accurate? • A design tool • Instant • Transparent • Parametric • Useful • Simplified • Steady state • Only what’s needed • Detailed • Verified • Dynamic simulation • Real world results • Constant improvement
  22. 22. How detailed? U = 0.86 W/(m²K) U = 0.84 W/(m²K) U = 1.22 W/(m²K) From the Pwassivhaus Institut
  23. 23. Examples www.passivhausprojekte.de
  24. 24. 5. Results Energy Consumption / CO2 Emissions • Heating • Energy Health and Wellbeing • CO2 levels • User comfort / satisfaction
  25. 25. Heat Loss • 12 PHEverythingelse Co-heating test results Centre for the Built Environment, Leeds Metropolitan University
  26. 26. Heat Consumption • 12 Measured heat consumption from four housing estates http://passipedia.org/
  27. 27. Wilkinson Primary School Architype (UK)
  28. 28. Energy Consumption kWh/sqm/year 0 50 100 150 200 250 2013 2014 2013 2014 2013 2014 2013 2014 2013 2014 CIBSE CIBSE TM46 BREEAM2Very2Good BREEAM2Excellent Passivhaus Passivhaus Passivhaus Typical Good2 pracGce Median Willows St2Lukes Oakmeadow Bushbury Wilkinson 70+%reduction
  29. 29. CO2 levels
  30. 30. Camden Passive House bere:architects (UK)
  31. 31. Comfort / Satisfaction
  32. 32. Wimbish Social Housing Parsons + Whittley (UK)
  33. 33. Comfort / Satisfaction
  34. 34. Takeaways: to close the gap • Clear measurable targets • Model accurately and often to measure design • Measure completed buildings and learn • Accountability throughout the process
  35. 35. VIA-architecture.net

×