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How have forests changed? Results from FRA 2015

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FAO has been monitoring the world's forests at 5 to 10 year intervals since 1946. The Global Forest Resources Assessments (FRA) are now produced every five years in an attempt to provide a consistent approach to describing the world's forests and how they are changing. The Assessment is based on two primary sources of data: Country Reports prepared by National Correspondents and remote sensing that is conducted by FAO together with national focal points and regional partners. The scope of the FRA has changed regularly since the first assessment published in 1948. These assessments make an interesting history of global forest interests, both in terms of their substantive content, but also in their changing scope. This presentation provides a summary of the FRA 2015 edition.
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How have forests changed? Results from FRA 2015

  1. 1. How have forests changed? Results from FRA 2015 K. MacDicken, FAO Forestry
  2. 2. 286national correspondents 6,000+forest inventory Resource partners
  3. 3. The Collaborative Forest Resources Questionnaire: Making Joint Data Collection Work
  4. 4. How have forests changed?
  5. 5. But first, how have we changed in the past 25 years?
  6. 6. 40% 2.5x 37% 3.2%
  7. 7. 200 million m3 Annual wood removal 893 187 High income countries Industrial Woodfuel (million m3) 28 431 Low income countries Industrial Woodfuel (million m3)
  8. 8. Net emissions from forests 1.5 Gt CO2 per year CO2 129 million ha Land conversion
  9. 9. Natural forest 239 million ha 110 million ha Planted forest 200 million ha Protected area 150 million ha Biodiversity conservation
  10. 10. …and we changed the extent of global forest area
  11. 11. Forest area loss has been cut in half and is now less than one-tenth the rate of human population growth 1
  12. 12. Percentage of land area
  13. 13. … and in forest area per capita
  14. 14. Lost or burned: which is more important? Nearly 7 million ha of natural forest lost per year from 2010-2015. An average of over 50 million ha of forest land burned every year. compared to
  15. 15. Forest area continues to expand in the temperate and boreal zones and contract in the tropics 2
  16. 16. Forest area gains and losses
  17. 17. Tropical forest loss 7.2 million ha per year 6.6 million ha per year Agricultural expansion in the tropics Tropics: 2000-2010
  18. 18. The bulk of the world’s forest is natural forest. But the share of planted forest is increasing. Year Natural forest (%) Planted forest (%) 1990 96 4 2005 94 6 2015 93 7
  19. 19. Natural forest change (1990-2015)
  20. 20. Natural forest change (2010-2015)
  21. 21. Planted forest change (1990-2015)
  22. 22. Planted forest change (2010-2015)
  23. 23. Our capacity to manage forests for the long-term has never been stronger. 3
  24. 24. More than half of all forest is permanent forest 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Forest area Not permanent Private State-owned
  25. 25. UP SFM supportive policies and legislation UP Management Planning UP Forest monitoring through inventories UP Forest management certification
  26. 26. More measurements, monitoring, and reporting
  27. 27. Forest area certified as sustainably managed increased everywhere More forest area is under management plans
  28. 28. The Future
  29. 29. What do countries think will happen to their forest area by 2030? • Some countries expect it will decrease (27%) • 21 countries expect a decrease of 65 million ha or 6% of their forest area • Some think it will increase (73%) • 52 countries expect a total increase of 144 million ha or 10% of their forest area
  30. 30. Three important take-aways 1 Forest area loss has been cut in half and is now less than one-tenth the rate of human population growth 2 Forest area continues to expand in the temperate and boreal zones and contract in the tropics 3 Our capacity to manage forests for the long-term has never been stronger.
  31. 31. Explore these resources: –How are forests changing? –Special Issue of Forest Ecology and Management –Desk Reference –Country Reports –Forest Land Use Data Explorer www.fao.org/forestry/fra
  32. 32. Forest resource information without investment and action is just interesting history… Let us put this information to use for present and future generations…
  33. 33. Thank you.
  34. 34. Please see us at the FRA booth in the FAO Pavilion! Don’t miss the session: Forest resources and how they are changing, TUESDAY 1245-1415h in Hall 5/6 www.fao.org/forestry/fra

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