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Employee engagement

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A study on Employee Engagement with special reference to SRF Limited Chennai

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Employee engagement

  1. 1. 1 A STUDY ON EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO SRF LIMITED CHENNAI A project submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the award of The degree of Master of Business Administration Submitted By GUNASEKARAN.M Registration Number: 14MB1786 Under the Guidance of PROF. SRINIDHI K PARTHASARADHI Of Master of Business Administration University of Mysore Bangalore- 560078
  2. 2. 2 CERTIFICATE This is to certify that the project work entitled A STUDY ON EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT WITH SPECIAL REEFERENCE TO SRF LIMITED CHENNAI submitted to University of Mysore in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the award of the degree of Master of Business Administration in 2015-2016 is a record of the original work done by GUNASEKARAN.M (14MB1786) under my supervision and guidance and this project work has not formed the basis for the award of Degree or similar title to any candidate of any University. Signature of Director Signature of the Guide Prof.Srinidhi k Parthasarathi Prof.Srinidhi k Parthasarathi
  3. 3. 3 DECLARATION I GUNASEKARAN M, student of National School of Business, University of Mysore, and Bangalore hereby declare that I have completed project on “A STUDY ON EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT” with special reference to SRF LIMITED CHENNAI in the academic year 2015-16. The information submitted is true and original to the best of my knowledge. Place: Bangalore Signature of the Candidate Name: Gunasekaran.M
  4. 4. 4 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT First and foremost I thank THE ALMIGHTY for showering his blessings constantly throughout my life. I express my sincere gratitude to PROF. SRIDHAR MURTHY S R president of National school of business for admitting me in this college to pursue this course. My sincere profound thanks to PROF. SRINIDHI K PARTHASARATHI Director of National school of business who provided me this wonderful opportunity to carry out this project work. It is my duty to convey my very special thanks to PROF. SRINIDHI K PARTHASARATHI Director of National school of business for his guidance and tireless efforts throughout the project without which his work would have not been possible. At this juncture I extend my gratitude to my respondents who answered to my questions and helped me to complete my project in a successful way and I would also like to thank my parents and my friends who supported me to finish this project. Signature of candidate (GUNASEKARAN.M)
  5. 5. 5 Executive summary: Employee engagement is associated with many desirable outcomes, such as job satisfactions, intentions to stay and job performance. Companies with a greater number of engaged employees typically have lower operating costs, higher customer satisfaction and higher profits. There is a tangible monetary benefit to companies’ investing time and resources in fostering higher engagement within their employees. The task of precisely in defining employee engagement is still ongoing, but it is most often defined in terms of behaviours exhibited in the workplace. Engaged employees are prepared to go the extra mile in pursuit of workplace excellence. They are ambassadors for their organizations, who will speak highly of the company and its people, even when they are not in a work setting. An engaged employee is identifiable by workplace behaviours such as losing track of time as they are so absorbed in the test at hand. This is distinct from excessive overtime in order to give the impression of ‘hard work’. Both look the same, but one is productive for the employer-employee relationship and one is not. Academics would say that not enough is understood about what drives employee engagement as most research in the area has tended to focus on business has been positive and has been linked with higher profitability, practice has raced ahead of the underpinning research in pursuit of creating a more engaged and hence profitable workforce. I took research to aid understanding of the area by investing the relationship between employee engagement and retention level. At the same time I looked at the interplay between individual difference and engagement levels of the organizations. I
  6. 6. 6 hoped to discover best practices of the organizations and the individual’s expectation from such strategies. CONTENTS Particulars Page No. Introduction Employee engagement 1 Objective of the Research 2 Research Methodology 2 Significance of the Study 3 Limitation of the Study 3 Company profile 4 Chapter 1: The Literature Review 1.1 what is Employee Engagement 28 1.2 Definition of Employee Engagement 30 13 Historical Background of Employee Engagement 32 1.4 Employee Engagement in India 33 1.5 Employee Retention 34 1.6 Hierarchy of Engagement 37 Chapter-2 2.1 Findings( Analysis and Graphical representation for Employees) 42 Chapter- 3 3.1 Findings ( Analysis and Graphical representation for HR Managers ) 55 3.2 Statistical analysis 69 Chapter-4 4.1 Summary of Findings 71
  7. 7. 7 Chapter-5 5.1 Conclusion 74 5.2 Suggestions 76 Bibliography 77 Questionnaire 78 List of Tables & Figures List of Tables Page No 1.Analysis and Graphical Representation for Employees 42-54 2. Analysis and Graphical Representation for HR Manager 55-68 3. Statistical Analysis 69 List of Figures 1.Analysis and Graphical Representation for Employees 42-54 2. Analysis and Graphical Representation for Employees 55-68
  8. 8. 8 INTRODUCTION
  9. 9. 9 INTRODUCTION: “Ultimately, engagement is a two-way street. And there are no shortcuts. But the journey can be as critical to Overall business performance as any other Sphere of corporate activity’’ Employee Engagement “A positive attitude held by the employee Towards the organization and its values. An engaged employee is aware of business Context, and works with colleagues to improve Performance within the job for the benefit of the Organization.’’
  10. 10. 10 Objective of the research: 1. To find out the employee engagement strategies in organizations 2. To study the correlation between the employee engagement practices carried out in the company and retention levels 3. To benchmark the employee engagement practices adopted in their organizations 4. To identifying the involvement of employee engagement activities Research methodology: Types of research: Primary data: Data collection method through questionnaire method was used and employee responses on that were tabulated and represented in percentage from, which then were analyzed and interpreted. This was followed by findings and recommendations. The questionnaire consisted of both open ended as well as multiple choice questions based on 6 factors as listed below: 1. Attachment to the job 2. Agreeableness 3. Emotional stability 4. Openness to experience 5. Achievement orientation 6. Self-efficacy The above factors are interdependent factors and retention of employees is dependent on it.
  11. 11. 11 Secondary data: It was through a list of websites, books, journals, and newspaper and news magazines articles as given at the end of this project references, web logography and bibliography. Hypothesis: The retention of employees is dependent on the independent factors. Significance of the study: People often lie in exit interviews about why they are leaving. Managers should, of course, know in advance who is leaving and why. A comprehensive list like this is of little value unless used as a guide to gather information as to how to engage the employees so that to retain the talents in the organizations. Limitations of the study: 1. Due to their work commitments, some of the respondents might have answered without fully comprehending the questions while some of them could have given biased answers which might affect the findings of the study. 2. Due to time constraint, the study was conducted only among too few employed and therefore the findings of the study may but be applicable to the entire organization. 3. The study was conducted during the period October to November 2015. Since opinions and perceptions are subject to change, the findings of the study may not be applicable in the future.
  12. 12. 12 COMPANY PROFILE: SRF LIMITED About us: SRF with a turnover of $725 million (Rs. 4500 crore) is a multi-business entity engaged in the manufacture of chemical based industrial intermediates. Its business portfolio covers Technical Textiles, Fluorochemicals, Specialty Chemicals, Packaging Films and Engineering Plastics. As a manufacturer of a wide range of products that make people's daily lives safer and more comfortable, SRF claims to touch everyone's life every day in more ways than one. With headquarters in Gurgaon, India, the 6500-strong global workforce company has operations in two more countries, Thailand and South Africa. SRF is the market leaders in most of its businesses in India and also enjoys significant global presence in some of its businesses. The company, equipped with state-of-the-art R&D facilities, boasts of its Chemical Technology Group that is actively involved in process innovations and product development. A winner of the prestigious Deming Prize for two of its businesses, tyre cord business in 2004 and Chemicals Business in 2012, SRF adopts TQM as a management way. The company through its social wing, SRF Foundation, remains committed to continue to contribute towards the cause of education, vocational skills, health, natural resource management and affirmative action. Global operation The multi-business corporate group SRF with headquarters in Gurgaon, India has over the years expanded its footprints beyond the national boundaries. Today it enjoys the status of a global entity with operations in three countries; nine manufacturing plant locations in India and two each in Thailand and South Africa. The market leader in most
  13. 13. 13 of its businesses in India, SRF is the world's 2nd largest manufacturer of Nylon 6 tyre cord and belting fabrics. South Africa Industex Technical Textiles (Pty) Limited, South Africa: Industex Technical Textiles (Pty) Limited, a South African company is the manufacturer of the belting fabrics with an annual production capacity of approximately 3,500 tonnes. SRF acquired this plant in 2008 which was then known as Industex Technical Textiles (Pty) Limited. Post acquisition, the entity will be known as SRF Industex Belting (Pty) Limited. The acquisition of this unit gave SRF an opportunity to enter Africa, a continent of the future. SRF endeavours to leverage the growing presence of the mining industry in South Africa, which is the largest consuming sector for the belting fabrics business. SRF FLEXIPAK South Africa (Pty) Ltd With over two decades of rich experience in producing quality films worldwide, SRF's Packaging Films Business is one of the largest manufacturers of a spectrum of standard and specialty Bi-axially Oriented Polyethylene Terephthalate (BOPET) and Bi- axially Oriented Polypropylene (BOPP) films. SRF made its foray in a new substrate, polypropylene, by setting up a BOPP Film Plant in Durban (South Africa) in November 2013. With an annual capacity of 25,500 MT, the plant has the latest 8.7 meter 5-layer co-extrusion technology for efficient BOPP film production from Bruckner Group GmbH (Germany). The line is capable of film production between 10 and 80 microns, suitable for a wide range of applications. It is also supplemented by a 2.8 meter vacuum-metallization plant. Manufacturing Plant Durban, South Africa
  14. 14. 14  SRF diversified its portfolio and set up its first BOPP facility. SRF has installed the latest 5-layer co-extrusion technology for efficient BOPP film production. The line is capable of film production between 10 and 80 microns suitable for wide range of end applications. It is complimented by a 2.8 meter vacuum metallization plant. SRF Industries (Thailand) Ltd SRF Industries (Thailand) Ltd is a wholly owned subsidiary of SRF Global BV, which is incorporated in Thailand. The company is engaged in the manufacture and distribution of nylon tyre cord fabrics and BOPET (polyester) films. Nylon Tyre Cord Plant The Thai-based unit has an annual production capacity of approximately 12,000 tonnes of dipped nylon tyre cord fabric. Established in 1995 in collaboration with Zimmer, Saurer Allma & Utica, the plant was originally known as Thai Baroda Industries Limited (TBIL). The plant, however, came to be known as SRF Technical Textiles after its acquisition by SRF in September 2008. Located in Map ta Phut Industrial Area, Rayong, the unit spreads over 99 Rai i.e 39 acres. Awards & Recognition The company's Nylon Cord Plant in Thailand has been certified for its quality and management practices. Our certifications include: BOPET (Polyester) Film Plant SRF's polyester film plant at Thailand is SRF's first overseas packaging film plant. Set up as a green field project the plant commenced operations from 31st May 2013. The successful start-up of the PFB plant at Thailand has not only enhanced SRF's capacity but has also positioned the company firmly on the global map. Manufacturing Plant
  15. 15. 15  Name of the plant: SRF Industries (Thailand) Ltd  Year of Establishment: 2013  Key Production Facilities:  This is SRF's first overseas packaging film plant. The state-of-the art BOPET facility has 8.7 meter-wide film line that can produce films with a range of 8-125 microns. It is supplemented by a 2.8 meter vacuum - metallization plant.  Installed Capacities: BOPET Film Lines â€" 28,500 TPA MET PET Film Lines - 7200 TPA  Technology Providers: BOPET Film Lines - Lindauer DORNIER GmbH (Germany) MET PET Film Lines - Applied Materials Inc (Germany)  Products: BOPET Films (PETLAR) Research & development With our state-of-the-art R&D facilities and an ingenious team of scientists and technologists we are making tomorrow happen today. We at SRF, make efforts to develop products, which not only meets the specifications, but also are economical and ecological. R&D Centers for Specialty Chemicals The Chemicals Technology Group (CTG), created specifically to focus on developing new processes and technologies for specialty chemicals, has been the silent performer behind the success of Flurochemicals and Specialty Chemicals Business of SRF. The team of scientists working in the Chemicals Technology Group continues to develop products to cater needs of agrochemical, pharmaceuticals and other niche customers through two R&D centres, one at Bhiwadi in Rajasthan and the second one at Manali near Chennai in Tamil Nadu. Equipped with state-of- the-art facilities, the R&D centres under CTG, employ the best of talent from some of the most reputed educational institutions in the country. The R&D teams work on synthesis of new halogenated organic compounds as well as
  16. 16. 16 development of analytical methods for them. The R&D labs are equipped with cutting edge in-process and product testing facilities like LC, LC/MS, GC,GC/MS, FT-IR, Spectrophotometer etc. SRF provides an integrated service from research (process development) to kilo scale synthesis to commercial scale supply, supported by its in-house process development and engineering expertise. SRF has a rich experience and successful track record of development & commercialization of various complex organic molecules, while maintaining high standards of EHS. At SRF, the focus is on providing highest value to its customers, while supporting them throughout the life cycle of their products with a high level of professionalism, ensuring confidentiality and transparency to them. R&D Centre for Technical Textiles Business The Technical Textiles Research & Development Center located in Manali (Tamil Nadu) is a premier institution, leading the industry through continuous improvements in technology and processes for futuristic products. With an amalgamation of dedicated scientists and engineers from prestigious academic institutes and experienced in-house talent, the research centre is equipped with world-class infrastructure and pilot facility for polymerisation, spinning, twisting, dipping and coating for new product and process developments. The centre also offers joint product and process development with customers, providing them with customized products to suit their specific requirements. R&D Centre for Engineering Plastics Business SRF's Engineering Plastics Business has been leveraging its R&D capabilities to expand successfully in new products and also new polymers for its target segment (auto and electrical). The products have been successfully launched in the global markets. Legacy: Committed to nation building since 1889
  17. 17. 17 SRF boasts of a lineage which is a century old. The company remains committed to creating wealth for its stakeholders in business while holding fast to the rigid standards of ethics and morality of its founders. The company continues to cherish and defend the values of serving the needs of its community. SRF is also keeping the traditions of its founders alive through promoting arts, culture, music and sports. Building on the legacy of its founding group that established some of the premiere academic institutes of the country, SRF continues to strive to advocate the cause of quality education in India. History: SRF began as Shri Ram Fibres in 1970 when its parent company DCM decided to set up a separate entity to manufacture nylon tyre cord fibres. Its formation was a result of the foresight that nylon was the future material for tyre cord fibres. The company established its first plant in Manali near Chennai in 1973. With an initial annual capacity of 2000 tonnes of nylon cords, the plant started operations in 1974. Shri Ram Fibres thus became one of the first companies in India to start manufacturing nylon tyre cords. Over the years, the company expanded its product line in technical textiles and also diversified into other businesses like Chemicals, Packaging Films and Engineering Plastics. The company was no longer manufacturing fibres alone, a fact that necessitated the change in the name of the company. Shri Ram Fibres thus became SRF in 1990 In between, the company made a tryst with unrelated business diversifications as well. It entered into a Joint Venture with Denso of Japan, a supplier of auto components to Toyota. The commercial production at SRF Nippondenso started in 1986. The same year, SRF also started a new venture SRF Finance. In 1995, the company entered into health care segment by setting up a Vision Care project to manufacture plastic lenses at Bangalore. All the three units were eventually divested, pursuant to a decision by the board to concentrate on its core businesses only. Heritage:
  18. 18. 18 SRF prides itself in inheriting a legacy of its founders whose contributions to Indian industry are legendary. It is a matter of pride for all in SRF that Sir Shri Ram, who founded the Shri Ram Group of companies more than a century ago and Dr. Bharat Ram, the founder Chairman of SRF, are still remembered and ranked among one of the country's leading business visionaries of all times. At SRF, their ideals and principles continue to inspire all to aspire for higher standards of ethics in business. Shri Ram Group Founder  Was the founder of DCM, one of India's largest business houses  Built an industrial empire manufacturing a vast variety of goods like textiles, sugar, chemicals, fans, electric motors, sewing machines, crockery, etc.  Was the Founder Chairman of the Industrial Finance Corporation.  Elected Chairman of Sindri Fertilizers, the first national venture in the public sector in free India.  Was intrumental in setting up several prestigious institutions of higher learning and arts in India such as the Lady Shri Ram College, Shriram College of Commerce and Delhi School of Economics  Was knighted by the British Government in 1941 SRF Founder Chairman A winner of one of the most prestigious civilian distinguished awards in India, Padma Bhusan, in 1972, Dr. Bharat Ram was considered the voice and conscience of Indian business  Elected President of FICCI in 1965  Appointed as the Chairman of Indian Airlines in 1967
  19. 19. 19  Elected as the first Asian President of the International Chamber of Commerce in 1969 Our values SRF VALUES. OUR LEGACY OUR HERITAGE AND NOW, OUR FUTURE. At SRF, values are not just strong words. Not just a theory. It's a way of life. It's a collection of habits that should be reflected in our day-to-day behaviour. We believe in the concept of RINEW which in SRF stands for R - Respect I - Integrity N - Non Discrimination E - Excellence W - Well Being Respect  We believe in building and nurturing relationships with all by treating them with respect and dignity  We will stand by our commitments  We will ensure that transacting business with us is easy  We will treat each individual with respect & dignity  We will encourage people to express their opinions frankly  We will promote a culture of accessibility at all levels and positions  We believe in the innate potential of each employee  We will listen and respond to the voice of our shareholders and investors, and will strive to deliver sustained results that will satisfy them
  20. 20. 20  We will set high standards in corporate governance Integrity  We will not compromise on our ethical and moral standards  We will not indulge in any action that brings the organization into disrepute  We will not indulge in any financial malpractice  We will never misuse the resources of the company  As employees, we will be open in our dealings with each other Non-discrimination  We will provide equal opportunities to all  We will not discriminate on account of gender, caste, religion, region, nationality, language and physical disabilities, subject to appropriateness of the role  We will not tolerate behavior or beliefs that promote discrimination and/ or damage the social fabric of the organization  We will encourage meritocracy Excellence  We will pursue excellence in all that we do  We will encourage contribution through team work  We will use the SRF management way as a means to achieving excellence  We will encourage creativity and innovation by individuals and teams  We will continuously invest in our resources, systems and processes so that our long term organizational capability is not compromised  We encourage employees to display initiative and passion in all that they do
  21. 21. 21  We believe that people should put in efforts beyond the 'call of duty' as and when required  We will set challenging targets for ourselves and our teams  We encourage people to seek and provide support to each other Well Being  We believe that happy employees are a key to organizational success SRF WAY At SRF, the employees are continuously improving everyday operations, thus making their function's job better, simpler, cheaper and safer. This guiding principle of 'People satisfying customers efficiently' is a key tenet of SRF's management practices. To know more about our business practices and our approach, select a section. TQM Overview The TQM way emphasises on everyone participating in improvements and working systematically to create value for customers and internal stakeholders. TQM cuts across all aspects of SRF's working, be it product or process designing, or in the management of customer relationships. It is a customer oriented, fact based management practice that uses systematic methods for resolving plant problems to softer issues of people management. The practice combines principles with clear methods, systems and tools as an integrated whole, enabling the processes across the organization to deliver results. This has resulted in improved cycle times, reduced wastes, enhanced operational efficiencies and better people engagement. TQM in SRF
  22. 22. 22 Our chairman, Mr Arun Bharat Ram foresaw the changes that SRF would need to accomplish in the wake of liberalisation. Like most Indian companies at that time, SRF was no different in its approach towards customers or costs. But Mr Arun Bharat Ram dreamt of making SRF a world class organisation and he believed that TQM would be the vehicle for this transformation. He, together with the top management, studied TQM in Japan and in 1993 created what today is the SRF management way. The improvement journey in SRF commenced at its Tyrecord Business in Manali, near Chennai. 5-S was launched with everyone's participation. Product quality improvements were made, management decisions were taken to promote the practice of quality first and customer first. Systems were created for managing not only costs, but also for reducing people complaints, thus boosting their morale. Capabilities were built across the plant. With three new units, two of which were acquired, TQM played an important role in harmonizing not only the best practices across the business, but also integrated the culture across the four plants. Internalization of TQM Over the years, the TQM movement at SRF gathered momentum bringing almost every facet of the organizational activity in all the businesses under its fold: manufacturing, marketing, designing, engineering, projects, HR and others. Linking TQM methods right at the planning cycle enables the company to manage and monitor its businesses through two simultaneous approaches: a. Daily Management for routine activities and Breakthrough Management for achieving larger goals which entail strategic direction change. The annual planning process involves people right at all levels including supervisors, and the plans are deployed to all, thus improving the possibility of success. b. TQM in SRF integrates aspects of TPM (Total Productive Maintenance) as well as TPS (Toyota Production System) or Lean. Recent work includes applications in non-manufacturing areas as well.
  23. 23. 23 Total involvement of employees SRF involves everybody across the organization in improvement activities. This is core to the SRF management way based on the TQM model. Our framework is designed and rests on three basic pillars of people involvement: a. Providing basic 'Education' on TQM through basic enrolment programs b. Building wide 'participation' through improvement vehicles such as 5S, Kaizens and QCC c. Promoting "skill enhancement" through problem solving: unique in house certification programs called "PSP Blue"(with elements of Lean) and "PSP Silver" that deals with more complex areas of new product development and systems design. Nearly 1000 people are enrolled into the program, and about 50% of those certified as problem solvers. SRF is credited with running one of the most successful Kaizen programs in the country. In April 2009, the company achieved a milestone of 2,50, 000 implemented Kaizens. QC circles, which are autonomously run workmen improvement teams abound, routinely bag top honours and recognitions in various national and international conventions. SRF is credited with running one of the most successful Kaizen programs in the country. In April 2009, the company achieved a milestone of 2,50,000 implemented Kaizens. QC circles, which are autonomously run workmen improvement teams abound, routinely bag top honours and recognitions in various national and international conventions.
  24. 24. 24 Besides presenting at in-company conventions, our people get many opportunities to showcase their improvement projects and best practices at external summits, forums, conferences and competitions, thereby improving their abilities as professionals. Way forward A strong foundation of TQM enables breakthrough ideas to emerge and contribute to new opportunities for growth, both organic and inorganic. AWARDS & REECOGNITION  In 2004, SRF became the first tyre cord company in the world to win the prestigious Deming Application Prize for Total Quality Management  SRF's Chemical Business awarded with Responsible Care Logo by Indian Chemical Council (ICC), Mumbai  SRF conferred with the prestigious Greentech Safety Platinum Award 2006-07  SRF conferred with the prestigious Greentech Environment Excellence Platinum Award 2007  SRF developed processes to manufacture HFC 134a, HFC 32 (different varieties of new generation refrigerant gases) through in-house R&D efforts  SRF developed processes to manufacture HFC 134a, HFC 32 (different varieties of new generation refrigerant gases) through in-house R&D efforts  SRF holds a process patent for HFC 32, issued by the United States Patent and Trademark Office  SRF's Chemicals Business received 'Commendation Certificate' under the prestigious CII ITC Sustainability Award for the year 2008 in the Independent Category for 'Strong Commitment' towards sustainable development of the country and again bagged the same award for 'Significant Achievement' for the year 2009
  25. 25. 25  Chairman, Mr. Arun Bharat Ram, conferred with the prestigious Jamshetji Tata Award from the Indian Society for Quality (ISQ) in the year 2006 Technical textile With a wide range of products SRF is not only the largest manufacturer of technical textiles in India but also enjoys a global leadership for most of the products under this business. Apart from India its manufacturing plants for technical textiles are present in Thailand and South Africa. SRF's product basket for technical textiles contains nylon tyre cord fabrics, polyester tyre cord fabrics, belting fabrics, coated fabrics, laminated fabrics, fishnet twines and industrial yarns. The Technical Textiles Research & Development Center located in Manali (Tamil Nadu) Is premier institution, leading the industry through continuous improvements in technology and processes for futuristic products. An amalgamation of dedicated scientists and engineers from prestigious academic institutes and experienced in-house talent, the research centre is equipped with world-class infrastructure and pilot facility for polymerisation, spinning, twisting, dipping and coating for new product and process developments. The centre also offers joint product and process development with customers, providing them with customised products to suit their specific requirements. The technical textiles are high-performance fabrics that are mainly used for non- consumer applications. According to the end use of its products, SRF is said to be present in the following categories of technical textiles: Tyre cord SRF tyre cord fabrics are used as reinforcement for all categories of tyres - be it cycle, passenger car, light commercial vehicles, heavy commercial vehicles, tractor and
  26. 26. 26 off-the-road (OTR) tyres. It has the entire range of textile reinforcement including wicking and non-wicking chafer for heavy-duty tyres and tubeless radial tyres. Today SRF is the second largest Nylon 6 tyre cord fabrics manufacturer in the world. SRF also boasts of India's first and only plant having capacity to produce new generation High Modulus Low Shrinkage (HMLS) yarn used for reinforcement of passenger radial tyres and transmission belts and rubberised hoses. The company has four tyrecord fabric plants in India and one in Thailand. The Indian plants are located at Manali (Tamil Nadu), Malanpur (Madhya Pradesh), Gummidipoondi (Tamil Nadu) and Viralimali (Tamil Nadu). Three of SRF plants have fully integrated facility from polymerization to dipped fabric and one from polymerization to greige fabric. All plants are ISO certified and most conform to ISO 14000 and ISO 18000. Nylon 6 & Nylon 66 Greige & Dipped Fabric Standard Construction type/specification: 840/2, 1260/2, 1260/3, 1680/2, 1890/2, 1890/3, 2520/2 Denier construction Construction & specifications as desired by the customers. Applications: For reinforcement of all categories of tyres from medium and heavy commercial vehicles to two-wheeler tyres. PolyesterTyre Cord Fabric Standard Construction type/specification: 1000/2,1000/3,1500/2, 2000/2 Denier. Specifications as desired by the customers Applications: For reinforcement of passenger and light commercial radial tyres. Cycle Tyre Cord Fabric
  27. 27. 27 SRF has pioneered the introduction of Nylon 6 Tyre Cord Fabrics, in the place of conventional cotton, for the manufacture of bicycle and rickshaw tyres in India. This has been carried out through application development and close coordination between the technical teams of both SRF and bicycle tyre manufacturers. Chafer Fabrics Chafer Fabrics are specialty fabrics used in the manufacture of heavy-duty tyres, especially to protect the side walls of the tyres. The fabric is offered in constructions of either 840/1 or 1260/1 Denier. SRF designs fabrics as per customer requirements. Industrial yarn SRF is the leading manufacturer of Nylon 6 Industrial yarn and Polyester Industrial yarn. SRF had begun its commercial production of Nylon 6 industrial yarn and fishnet twine in 1977. Today SRF is the domestic leader in Fishnet twine and industrial yarn products, with a strong dealer network. With regard to Polyester industrial yarn, commercial production commenced effective May 2009. The manufacturing facility is having state-of-art machines with renowned technology from Toray Industries, Japan. The plant is capable of producing new generation family of High Modulus Low Shrinkage yarn (HMLS), high tenacity regular yarn and low shrinkage yarn of various end user applications such as Tyrecord Fabric, Belting Fabric, Solid Woven Fabric, Caoted Fabric, Transmission belts, Hoses, Narrow Woven Fabric, Ropes, Cordages. All these yarns availbe in both adhesive and activated and non-adhesive activated form. Laminated fabric
  28. 28. 28 Laminated fabric is a combination of a base fabric (polyester in our case) laminated with a film (PVC) on either side or both sides. SRF offers both frontlit and backlit fabrics for billboards, banners, and signages. These laminated fabrics are suitable for high quality screen printing and digital printing. In addition SRF offers products for static and dynamic covering solutions. Manufacturing facilities The production facility for laminated fabrics is located at Kashipur (Uttarakhand) with state-of-art facilities. Laminated fabric is a combination of a base fabric (polyester in our case) laminated with a film (PVC) on either side or both sides. SRF offers both frontlit and backlit fabrics for billboards, banners, and signages. These laminated fabrics are suitable for high quality screen printing and digital printing. In addition SRF offers products for static and dynamic covering solutions. Product specification Laminated products from SRF are mainly used for two segments, flex and static covers. 1. Flex is the fabric which is used in the signage industry for various applications such as banners, hoardings, bill boards. It is referred to as 'media' on which the advertisement is printed SRF has the following variety of products for the flex market: a. Frontlit Flex - Frontlit flex is used in that signage wherein light is cast onto the 'media'. SRF offers two SKUs in frontlit flex based on their weight - 260 gsm & 300 gsm. b. Backlit Flex Backlit flex is used in that signage wherein the light is cast from behind the flex. SRF provides Backlit flex in 520 gsm only. c. Blackback Flex is low weight covers used for applications ranging from pandal covers to grain covers to liners. Static Covers find usage in all those industries where protection is required from rain, sun, dust etc. Though static covers can be made from coated fabrics as well, the lamination provides a more economical and convenient option.
  29. 29. 29 1. Currently SRF offers static covers in a wide variety of sizes in two weight categories - 300 gsm & 350 gsm. 2. Static Covers are low weight covers used for applications ranging from pandal covers to grain covers to liners. Static Covers find usage in all those industries where protection is required from rain, sun, dust etc. 3. Though static covers can be made from coated fabrics as well, the lamination provides a more economical and convenient option. 4. Currently SRF offers static covers in a wide variety of sizes in two weight categories - 300 gsm & 350 gsm. Chemicals With a large portfolio of fluorochemicals and specialty chemicals, SRF supplies chemicals for diverse applications across industries. Starting with the refrigerant production facility in Bhiwadi near New Delhi in 1989, SRF has grown to become a highly backward integrated producer of refrigerants, chlorinated solvents and specialty chemicals. Now the business has manufacturing units at two locations in India, viz. Bhiwadi, Rajasthan and the newly developed Chemical Complex at Dahej, Gujarat. The in-house R&D capability to develop technologies and set up complex chemical plants coupled with the Total Quality approach to Management have allowed us to become a preferred source in chosen product-market segments globally with exports to over 60 countries worldwide. As a proud winner of the 2012 Deming Prize, the Chemicals Business of SRF comprising both the Fluorochemicals and the Specialty Chemicals businesses caters to the exacting quality requirements of the Automobile, Refrigerator, Air-conditioner, Laundry, Pharmaceutical and Agrochemical industries amongst others. Acquisition
  30. 30. 30 SRF signed a binding agreement on 31st December 2014 to purchase the global 134a regulated medical pharmaceutical propellant business from DuPont, a world leader in innovation and science. The acquisition comes into force with immediate effect. Under the transaction, SRF will own the DuPont Dymel® brand and will also receive the technology and know-how for setting up its own 'current Good Manufacturing Practices' (cGMP) facility for manufacturing HFC 134a Pharma grade. As per the agreement DuPont will supply SRF with product until SRF's production facility is approved. For SRF, this transaction provides immediate access to DuPont's technology, brand and customers, thus enabling an instant entry into the niche pharmaceutical segment at a global level. Besides, the transaction would also make SRF one of the world's few suppliers of the pharma grade of HFC 134a, a product with stringent purity and handling parameters. Technology development Building on its in-house R&D capability, SRF has received critical acclaim for developing indigenous technology to manufacture the following products:  Halons (now phased out as per Montreal Protocol)  HFC 134a  Trichloroethylene and  Perchloroethylene Technical Tie Ups & Acquisition In the early part of its journey, SRF collaborated with the some of the leading global chemical technology developers becoming one of the most respected chemical companies in the world. These include:  Allied Signal (now Honeywell) of USA in 1989 for CFCs and HCFC  Atofina (now Arkema) of France in 1995 for Chloromethanes  Dupont in 2015 for HFC 134a Pharma grade
  31. 31. 31 Way Forward With a global distribution network, SRF's Fluorochemicals Business is well positioned to service the market requirements for refrigerants and solvents. Specialty Chemicals With more than 25 years of experience in Halogen Chemistry, SRF's Specialty Chemicals Business enjoys an enviable reputation for its capabilities in developing and manufacturing advanced intermediates. These intermediates are used in the agrochemical and pharmaceutical industries. The business has expertise in Fluorine chemistry and deep knowledge in a variety of platform chemistries that act as a foundation for the enterprise. R&D Driven Driven by two state-of-the-art R&D labs and in-house plant design and project management teams, SRF has commercialized more than 40 molecules, with another 50 molecules at different stages of development and commercialization. More than 250 scientists and engineers are currently engaged in the area of process research, apart from a dedicated project team for timely execution. Business Offering The Business is fully integrated across the value chain. From access to critical starting materials, to in-house process research and development, lab synthesis, pilot production, and finally to setting up dedicated plants for commercial production, the business offers complete support to its highly quality conscious customers globally. The company also engages with customers for Custom Research, Contract Manufacturing and Collaborative Research/ Manufacturing.
  32. 32. 32 Infrastructure Building on its reputation of a quality producer of specialty chemicals, a Greenfield Chemicals Complex at Dahej in Gujarat was set up in 2012 at an investment of around $300mn. This is in addition to the existing production facility at Bhiwadi in Rajasthan. These fully integrated complexes provide a strong competitive advantage to SRF to manage product development from design to dispatch to the customers. These sites have multiple dedicated and flexible manufacturing facilities to suit specific client needs. The production facilities have well-equipped Q&A Labs that are accredited with the National Accreditation Board for Testing and Calibration of Laboratories (NABL) to ensure highest quality parameters for its customers. The labs are equipped with advanced equipment to follow global best practices and bring the best to the table to ensure that quality quotient remains uncompromising and in line with customer’s expectations. Certifications With a strong track record of safety in hazardous processes, the Business has invested substantially in facilities and processes to ensure international standards. These include certifications for process and environment management, occupational health and safety, and social accountability. On a voluntary basis, the Business has become a part of the Responsible Care initiative to drive continuous improvement in health, safety and environmental (HSE) aspects. Trusted partner
  33. 33. 33 With leading global pharmaceutical & agrochemical companies already featuring in its customer list, SRF has established credentials as a trusted and reliable partner to develop upcoming and new age compounds competitively. Consciousness of Intellectual Property Rights and sensitivity to the Environment, Health and Safety considerations are key aspects of this trust. Today, SRF has the capability to manufacture multiple products for multiple customers for a variety of applications. Focus of the Future The Business believes that it is only at the beginning of its journey. Going forward, it aims to master innovative platform chemistries and work with customers in new industries and applications to continue to generate value for its customers and partners. Commercial Manufacturing We have built upon our operational excellence over years and our facilities match international standards. Besides ISO 9001:2000, we have been accredited with ISO 14001 for environmental management standards, OHSAS 18001 for occupational health and safety and SA 8000 for social accountability. These all have been integrated into a single Integrated Management System (IMS). Process equipments included  SS316 reactors  Glass lined reactors  Inconel multi-tubular reactors  Exotic MOC(Inconel,Monel,Hastelloy)reactors  PTFE lined distillation columns  SS316 distillation columns  Glass distillation
  34. 34. 34 Packing films Packaging Films Business has emerged as one of the most preferred and trusted business partners in the flexible packaging arena. It prides itself in creating synergies of quality and innovation between high-performance Bi-axially Oriented Polyethylene Terephthalate (BOPET) and Bi-axially Oriented Polypropylene (BOPP) films. During a short span of ten years, the business has crafted a significant presence in EU, Americas, Middle East, ANZ, Russia and CIS, Africa, West Asia and South Asian regions and continues to expand its list of highly satisfied clientele across the world. Manufacturing facilities Packaging Films Business has been engaged in the manufacturing of BOPET Films (including metallized type) since 1995 and has two operating units in India at Indore and Kashipur. Its first 3.2 meter wide PET production line from Celier (France) started operations at Kashipur (Uttarakhand) in 1995 and has a 7500 MT capacity for producing both thin and thick PET films in the range of 8 - 190 microns. Since then the business has successfully embarked the journey of capacity expansion and added 8.5 and 8.7 meter wide lines (from Dornier, Germany) in Special Economic Zone, Madhya Pradesh in 2004 and 2009, to become the second largest thin PET film manufacturer in India. The SEZ unit is supported by two state of the art metallizers, soft embossing holographic machine and backward integrated PET Resin plant. In line with this expansion, the business is in the process of setting up a metallizing facility in Kashipur plant. In May 2013, the business set up a BOPET Film Plant, a Greenfield investment, in Rayong (Thailand). This unit has an 8.7-metre-wide film line supplied by Dornier (Germany) with an annual capacity of 28,500 MT and can produce films with a range as
  35. 35. 35 diverse as 8 to 125 microns. It is also supplemented by a 2.8 meter vacuum-metallization plant. It also made its foray in a new substrate, polypropylene, by setting up a BOPP Film Plant in Durban (South Africa) in November 2013. With an annual capacity of 25,500 MT, the plant has the latest 8.7 meter 5-layer co-extrusion technology for efficient BOPP film production from Bruckner Group GmbH (Germany). The line is capable of film production between 10 and 80 microns, suitable for a wide range of applications. It is also supplemented by a 2.8 meter vacuum-metallization plant. Engineering plastics Inventing tomorrow's solutions and fully serving the growing needs of our customers are central priorities for all that we work at Engineering Plastics Business (EPB) in SRF. Established in 1979, the Engineering Plastics Business of SRF enjoys the status of being the first company in India to start polymer compounding. Initially focused on manufacturing and compounding of Polyamide 6 resin, today the business offers several engineered compounds under following brands  TUFNYL brand of Polyamide 6 & Polyamide 66 engineering resins  TUFBET brand of Polybutylene Terephthalate (PBT) engineering resins  TUFPC brand of Polycarbonate (PC) engineering resins With over 200 grades serving markets as varied as Automobiles, Electrical & Electronics, Telecom, Railways, Consumer etc, no doubt that SRF's TUFNYL® , TUFBET® and TUFPC® brand of engineering resins are synonymous for quality and performance  We have a dedicated development centre and all grades/products are developed in-house.
  36. 36. 36  We have the largest product range in India, with more than 300 in- house developed grades.  We are the only engineering plastic company in India to have two manufacturing facilities in Chennai and Patnagar. CHAPTER-1 THE REVIEW OF LITERATURE
  37. 37. 37 1.1What is employee engagement? Employee engagement is not the same as employee satisfaction employee satisfaction only indicates how happy or content your employees are. It does address their level of motivation, or emotional commitment. For some employers, being satisfied means collecting a pay check while doing as little work as possible. Measuring employee’s satisfaction and making changes to increase employee satisfaction will not necessarily lead to increased performance. In fact, the conditions that make many employees “satisfied” with their job are likely to frustrate high performing employees. Top performers want to be challenged and to challenge the status quo. They embrace change, seek out ways to improve, and want all employees to be held accountable for delivering results. By contrast, low performing employees often cling to the results. By resist change, and avoid accountability whenever possible. How is employee engagement measured? Employee engagement is typically measured using an employee engagement survey that has been developed specifically for this purpose. Employee engagement survey must be statistically validated and benchmarked against other organisations if they are going to provide useful results. Without these things, it is difficult to know what you are measuring and whether the results are good or bad. Engagement can be accurately measured with short survey that contains just a few questions, but such short survey can only provide an indication of whether employees are engaged. They have a hard time explaining why employees are engaged or disengaged because they lack detail. In order to get a complete picture of employee
  38. 38. 38 engagement, a survey needs to include about few questions that cover a complete range of topic related to employee engagement. Components of employee engagement They are two primary factors that drive employee engagement. These factors are based on statistical analysis and widely supported by industry research. Engagement with the organizations measures how engaged employees are with the organizations as a whole, and by extension, how they feel about senior management. This factor has to do with confidence in organizations leadership as well as trust, fairness, values, and respect –i.e. how people like to be treated by others, both at work and outside of work. Engagement with “Manager” is a more specific measure of how employees feel about their direct supervisors. Topics include feeling valued, being treated fairly, receiving feedback and direction, and generally, having a strong working relationship between employee and manager based on mutual respect. Engagement With The Organization Engagement with the Manager Strategic Alignment Competency Beyond Engagement High Performance
  39. 39. 39 An organization needs more than just engaged employees in order to succeed. There are two additional areas that relate to employee performance and that are closely linked to engagement. Strategic Alignment: Does the organization have a clear strategy and set of goals? Do employees understand the strategy and goals? Do employees understand how the work they do contributes to the organization’s success? Strategic Alignment ensures that employee effort is focused in the right direction. If that effort is not focused in the right direction, it could be wasted. Competency: Do managers have the skills needed to get the job done? Do they display the behaviours needed to motivate employees? Competency is measured as part of the employee survey using our “upward feedback” module, or it can be measured via 360 Degree feedback. 1.2 Definition of Employee Engagement Employee engagement can be defined as an employee putting forth extra discretionary effort, as well as the likelihood of the employee being loyal and remaining with the organization over the long haul. Research shows that engaged employees: perform better, put in extra efforts to help get the job done, show a strong level of commitment to the organization, and are more motivated and optimistic about their
  40. 40. 40 work goals. Employers with engaged employees tend to experience low employee turnover and more impressive business outcomes. Employee engagement is more than just the current HR 'buzzword'; it is essential. In order for organizations to meet and surpass organizational objectives, employees must be engaged. Research has proven that wholly engaged employees exhibit,  Higher self-motivation.  Confidence to express new ideas.  Higher productivity.  Higher levels of customer approval and service quality.  Reliability.  Organizational loyalty; less employee turnover.  Lower absenteeism. The benefits of employee engagement The power of employee engagement is that it is closely connected to business results. When employees work in an environment in which they can focus their attention on their work and have a drive to do their best, organizations experience higher levels of productivity and profitability. Engaged employees look for better ways to do their work, spend less time on wasted activities, and make effective use of resources left to invest in further improvements. Although it is an important consideration, high financial compensation is not the only driver of increased employee retention. As addressed previously, employees decide to stay with organizations for other reasons, such as growth and development opportunity, strong leadership, and meaningful work. Turnover costs organizations millions of dollars each year, end engagement has a proven relationship to employee retention. No one likes going into a store where the
  41. 41. 41 sales clerks are sullen, absent, or uncooperative. It’s easy to see why customers notice engagement employees and are more satisfied and willing to purchase again. 1.3 Historical Background of Employee Engagement Over the past decade, the way in which people are managed and developed at work has come to be recognized as one of the primary factors in achieving improvement in organizational performance. This is reflected by popular idioms such as “people are our most important assents”. Back in the good old days of corporate world, things were pretty simple. Companies put people on career tracks straight out of colleges; they gave employees a job for life and waved them goodbye with a gold watch at retirement. The promise of the stable life as a company employee kept both morale and productivity high. Then things changed competition increased, margins shrank and shareholder got more demanding. Suddenly, company staff was finding the very job security they’d counted on was disappearing, and at speed. This upheaval meant companies had to find new ways to motivate their employees in order to make them more productive since, without stability, employees were looking for something else from their employers. And thus, engagement was born. In itself, engagement isn’t really a new idea; owners and managers have been talking about engagement, in one form or another, for centuries... They just used different words to express it. In former times, engagement focused more on productivity and achieving results through threat of punishment or by means of reward. But common sense – and good communication – eventually won out and, today, organizations everywhere are spending serious money on all forms of
  42. 42. 42 employee engagement. Boiled down, it simply means ‘developing a happy and loyal workforce’. Enlightened managers now realize that any company as a whole will benefit when its employees know what’s going on and they feel part of the team. The tricky part is in defining what makes a workforce happy, and in understanding how good will is translates into company success. In fact many research studies have described human resource management as a means of achieving competitive advantage. Consistent with this it is an equally important issue for the organization to retain their critical employees. Most organizations today continue to struggle with retention because they are relying on salary increase and bonuses to prevent turnover. In light of such critical emphasis being placed on human capital, Paula Ketter has aptly noted, “Engagement is all about creating a culture where people do not feel misused, overused, underused or abused”. At very basic level, employee engagement draws from the tenets of the ‘Hierarchy of needs’ as conceptualized by Maslow, the highest stage of which is self- actualization; the pinnacle of an individual’s fulfilment of talent and potential. This theory of ‘higher order needs’ was largely overlooked in the heydays of scientific ‘assembly line’ manufacturing. 1.4 Employee Engagement In India The recent Work Asia research study by Watson Wyatt Worldwide indicates that India has the highest percentage of highly engaged workers at 78% in Asia as compared to Japan, which has the lowest employee engagement level at 39%. Head to head with China, the engagement level of the Indian worker is 20% more than his Chinese counterpart. These are all encouraging signs – but the challenges and the opportunities ahead are manifold. The challenges faced by organizations in India are around attrition, communication, career development and engagement while trying to keep pace with the explosive growth. Outsourcing outfits have the highest attrition rates losing staff at a
  43. 43. 43 rate of between 100% and 200% a year. It is widely believed that organizations spend an average of 36% of their revenues on their employees but do not have a tangible way to measure its impact. The India study throws up some fascinating directions for HR and internal communication professionals. Employee engagement is no more just about the employee’s intent to leave. The employee’s commitment to the organizations and motivation to contribute to the organization’s success plays a significant role. The top three drivers in India are trust in senior management, how the organization is perceived for customer service and fair pay. Surprisingly, from an Indian context, the least valued factors in the continuum were benefits, compensation and performance management. 1.5 Employee Retention: Employee retention continues to remain a top priority at many organizations and one that companies increasingly view as a driver of business strategy. Business – critical knowledge can walk out the door when an employee leaves the company. While employee retention figures have long been used by companies as a measure of their performance in developing an effective organization, this view of employee retention is not only outdated, but these figures may not be comprehensive enough to truly determine the organization’s effectiveness. The concept of employee retention is more complex than simply evaluating employee turnover from one year to the next. These figures of employees an organization loses, it’s the number of top-performing employees that leave the company that should be of concern. For example, management is one of the key reasons employees decide to stay or leave an organization. If there is high turnover among the management ranks, employees may also feel unstable in this ever- changing environment. Yet, on the other hand, it may not be the best strategy to retain a manager that is disliked by employees. The business strategy of employee retention actually lies with employee engagement; retention is an outcome of engagement. What most organizations fail to realize is that employee engagement is the biggest retention factor they have control over.
  44. 44. 44 Engaged employees not only stay longer with the organization, they are more productive, more conscientious, make fewer errors, and take better care of customers. The business strategy of employee engagement among an organization’s top performers, not necessarily hence tire workforce. The importance of retaining top performers Many organizations ponder the questions, “what should the goal be for retention?” and “what is an appropriate level for employee turnover?” yet, in asking these questions, many organization don’t realize that there no set answers. If, for example, an organization loses five percent of its top performers every year, the results from this turnover could be potentially devastating to the company. On the other hand, if the company is losing 20 percent of its least productive employees, this could actually be very beneficial for the organization and an opportunity to increase the strength of its workforce each year. In other words, it’s not just about retention anymore- it’s about retaining the very best people at each level within the organization. The key to effective retention of top performers is to determine the factors that currently do, and will, keep them engaged. This method of gaining a clear understanding of who the top performers are within organization is called employee segmentation. Once an organization has segmented its workforce, it can then start to measure retention among its highest potential and highest rated, or most productive, employees. By viewing each segment separately, organizations are creating a more appropriate benchmark to measure employee retention, i.e., is the organization retaining or losing a high percentage of its best people. Understanding employee engagement
  45. 45. 45 Employee engagement can be defined as an employee putting forth extra discretionary effort, as well as the likelihood of the employee being loyal and remaining with the organization over the long haul. Research shows that engaged employees: perform better, put in extra efforts to help get the job done. Show a strong level of commitment to the organization, and are more motivated and optimistic about their work goals. Employers with engaged employees tend to experience low employee turnover and more impressive business outcomes Employee engagement is more than just the current HR ‘buzzword’; it is essential. In order for organizations to meet and surpass organizational objectives, employees must be engaged. Research has proven that wholly engaged employees exhibit,  Higher self-motivation  Confidence to express new ideas  Higher productivity  Higher levels of customer approval and services quality  Reliability  Organizational loyalty; less employee turnover  Lower absenteeism Current studies show that organizations are focusing on the meaning of employee engagement and how to make employees more engaged. Employees feel engaged when they find personal meaning and motivation in their work, receive positive interpersonal support, and operate in an efficient work environment. What brought engagement to the forefront and why is everyone interested in it? Most likely, the tight economy has refocused attention on maximizing employee output and making the most of organizational resources. When organizations focus attention on their people, they are making an investment in their most important resources. You can cut all the costs you want, but if you neglect your people, cutting costs won’t make such of a difference. Engagement is all about getting employees to “give it their all”. Some of the most successful organizations are
  46. 46. 46 known for their unique work environment in which employees are motivated to do their very best. These great places to work have been recognized in such lists as Fortune’s 100 best companies to work for. The concept of engagement is a natural evolution of past research on high-involvement, empowerment, job motivation, organizational commitment, and trust. All of these research streams focus on the perceptions and attitudes of employees about the work environment. 1.6 Hierarchy of engagement Employee engagement at each level In addition, employee segmentation is an important method to utilize when evaluating employee engagement at each level. For instance, the factors that engage the most productive employee in an organization may not be the same as the factors
  47. 47. 47 that engage the least productive employees. Those employees who receive the highest rankings on their performance reviews may tend to express higher levels of job satisfaction when they are presented with challenging opportunities that allow them to grow and learn. Those that receive the lowest rankings might be more focused on issues surrounding work/life balance and job security. While some factors, such as good communication, are important among all employees, the attempt to focus on the full spectrum of factors that engage the entire workforce may cause an organization to omit some of the factors that are the most important to the company’s most productive people. Employee satisfaction does not equal engagement While organizations may be aware “through the grapevine” that employees are unsatisfied, it’s the reasons for the dissatisfaction that elude them. While employee satisfaction is important, it’s not the end fame—it is only one piece of employee engagement. Satisfaction is imperative in that, for those individuals who are top performers, satisfaction may be derived from their achievement orientation, their ambition, or their sense of responsibility. On the other hand, the attempt to satisfy an under-performer who will only be content with a lightened workload may not be a worthy cause. Again, the focus is on ensuring that those individuals who have been identified as top performers and high potentials are engaged in the organization. As stated, employee engagement incorporates employee satisfaction, but also includes the essential element of pride, commitment and loyalty in the organization. Engaged employees aren’t concerned with meeting the minimum requirements to complete a task, they are focused on what they can do to better the company. Essentially, they take ownership in the company despite whether or not they actually own a share of stock. Drivers of engagement  A two-way relationship between the employer and employee
  48. 48. 48  The importance of the individual being able to align themselves to the products, services and values of the organization  The ability of the organization to communicate its vision, strategy, objective and values to its staff so that they are clearly understood  Management give staff sufficient “elbow room” and autonomy to let them fulfil their potential  The employer is highly effective at engaging in two-way communication with its staff, in particular encouraging upward communication  Lastly, that management from the top to the bottom of the organization are ‘committed leaders’ and that the key role of the immediate line manager/supervisor is recognised as one of the most important conduits to achieving effective employee engagement. Research shows that committed employees perform better. If we accept that engagement, as many believe, is ‘one step up’ from commitment, it is clearly in the organizations interests to understand the drivers of engagement. Analysis of the NHS case study data indicates that opinions about, and experiences of, many aspects of working life are strongly correlated with engagement levels. However, the strongest driver of all is a sense of feeling valued and involved. This has several key components:  Involvement in decision making  The extent to which employees feel able to voice their ideas, and managers listen to these views, and value employees’ contributions  The opportunity employees have to develop their jobs  The extent to which the organization is concerned for employees’ health and wellbeing The line manager clearly has a very important role in fostering employees’ sense of involvement and value—an observation that is completely consistent with IES’s research in many different areas of HR practice and employment, all of which point to the critical importance of the employee—manager relationship.
  49. 49. 49 IES’s diagnostic tool Source: IES survey The IES engagement model illustrates the strong link between feeling valued and involved and engagement. In addition to the model, IES offers a diagnostic tool
  50. 50. 50 (above), which can be used to derive organization-specific drivers from attitude survey data. Our findings Suggest that many of the drivers of engagement will be common to all organizations, regardless of sector; however, some variability likely, and the relative strength of each driver is also likely to be contingent upon the organization being studied. Personal Impact-Employee feel more engaged when they are able to make a unique contribution, experience empowerment, and have opportunities for personal growth. Past research concurs that issues such as the ability to impact the work environment and making meaningful choices in the workplace are critical components of employee empowerment. Focused work-Employees feel more engaged when they have clear direction, performance accountability, and an efficient work environment. Aside from the personal drive and motivation to make a contribution, employee needs to understand where to focus their efforts. Without a clear strategy and direction from senior leadership, employees will waste their time on the activities that do not make a difference for the organization’s success. Additionally, even when direction is in place, employees must receive feedback to ensure that they are on track and being held accountable for their progress. In particular, employees need to feel that low performance is not acceptable and that there are consequences for poor performance. Finally, employees want to work in an environment that is efficient in terms of its time, resources, and budget. Employees lose faith in the organization when they see excessive waste. Interpersonal Harmony-Employee feel more engaged when they work in a safe and cooperative environment. By safety, we mean that employee trust one another
  51. 51. 51 and quickly resolve conflicts when they arise. Employees want to be able to rely on each other and focus their attention on the tasks that really matter. Conflict wastes time and energy and needs to be dealt with quickly. Some researchers also find that trust and interpersonal harmony is a fundamental underlying principle in the best organizations. Employees also need to cooperate to get the job done. Partnerships across departments and within the workgroup ensure that employees stay informed and get the support they need to do their jobs. CHAPTER-2 FINDINGS [EMPLOYEES]
  52. 52. 52 2.1DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF EMPLOYEES 1. Do you know what is expected of you at work? Table 2.1.1 Respondents Percentage Strongly Agree 17 34% Agree 28 56% Disagree 3 6% Strongly Disagree 0 0 Not Applicable 2 4% Total 50 100%
  53. 53. 53 56% of the sample agreed to the fact that they are aware about the work which they have to perform while 34% are strongly agreed and few of them given negative on this fact. 2 .At work, do you have the opportunity to do what you do best every day? Table 2.1.2 Respondents Percentage Strongly Agree 16 32% Agree 32 64% Disagree 0 0 Strongly Disagree 0 0 Not Applicable 2 4% Total 50 100% 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 strongly agree Agree Disagree strongly disagree Not applicable
  54. 54. 54 Majority (64%) of the employees get the opportunity to do best of their work everyday while 4% of them not applicable on this and 32% of them strongly agreed. 3. In the last three months, have you received recognition or praise for doing good work? Table 2.1.3 Respondents Percentage Strongly Agree 7 14% Agree 35 70% Disagree 3 6% Strongly Disagree 0 0 Not Applicable 5 10% Total 50 100% 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 strongly agree Agree Disagree strongly disagree Not applicable
  55. 55. 55 70% of the employees have received recognition or praise in the last three months for doing good work while 14% of the employees are highly satisfied with recognition in their organization and 10% of them has not received any praise in the last 3 months. 4. Is there someone at work who encourages your development? Table 2.1.4 Respondents Percentage Strongly Agree 12 24% Agree 30 60% Disagree 3 6% Strongly Disagree 5 10 Not Applicable 0 0 Total 50 100% 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 strongly agree Agree Disagree strongly disagree Not applicable
  56. 56. 56 Generally people feel sense of belongingness when someone is their at their workplace to support them and 60% of the employees agreed on this fact while 24% have strongly agreed and the other 6% disagreed and 10% strongly disagreed. 5. At work, do your opinions seem to count? Table 2.1.5 Respondents Percentage Strongly Agree 10 20% Agree 38 76% Disagree 2 4% Strongly Disagree 0 0 Not Applicable 0 0 Total 50 100% 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 strongly agree Agree Disagree strongly disagree Not applicable
  57. 57. 57 Employees participation in decision making is again a criteria of measuring employee engagement. 76% of the employees have agreed that their decision seems to count, 20% strongly agreed to this and only 4% have disagreed. 6. Are your associates (fellow employees) committed to doing quality work? Table 2.1.6 Respondents Percentage Strongly Agree 7 14% Agree 39 78% Disagree 4 8% Strongly Disagree 0 0 Not Applicable 0 0 Total 50 100% 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 strongly agree Agree Disagree strongly disagree Not applicable
  58. 58. 58 78% of the sample agreed that their fellow employees are committed to do quality work while 8% have disagreed on this fact.14% of them have chosen strongly on this and the other 5% has given no comments on this. 7. In the last year, have you had opportunities at work to learn and grow? Table 2.1.7 Respondents Percentage Strongly Agree 12 24% Agree 33 66% Disagree 2 4% Strongly Disagree 0 0 Not Applicable 3 6% Total 50 100% 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 strongly agree Agree Disagree strongly disagree Not applicable
  59. 59. 59 Learning and Development is one of the most important aspect to find out the employee engagement in the organization. 66% have agreed that they get the opportunity to learn and grow in the organization while 24% of them have strongly agreed on it. 6% of the employee have not given any reply and 4% were disagree. 8. Are the pay and benefits in your organization comparable to similar companies? Table 2.1.8 Respondents Percentage Strongly Agree 10 20% Agree 32 64% Disagree 8 16% Strongly Disagree 0 0 Not Applicable 0 0 Total 50 100% 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 strongly agree Agree Disagree strongly disagree Not applicable
  60. 60. 60 64% of the sample is satisfied with pay and packages of their organization while 20% are highly satisfied with it. 16% disagree on the competitive pay and benefit packages. 9. Are job promotions in this organization fair and objective? Table 2.1.9 Respondents Percentage Strongly Agree 15 30% Agree 25 50% Disagree 0 0 Strongly Disagree 0 0 Not Applicable 10 20% Total 50 100% 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 strongly agree Agree Disagree strongly disagree Not applicable
  61. 61. 61 Half the percentage (50%) of the employees believe that the promotions are done objectively, 30% strongly agree to the fairness of the same while 20% doubt the fairness and objectivity of the process. 10. Are organization policies clearly communicated in the organization? Table 2.1.10 Respondents Percentage Strongly Agree 12 24% Agree 32 64% Disagree 0 0 Strongly Disagree 0 0 Not Applicable 6 12% Total 50 100% 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 strongly agree Agree Disagree strongly disagree Not applicable
  62. 62. 62 64% of the sample has agreed to be clear on the policies that prevail in their respective organizations. A good proportion of 24% strongly agreed on the clarity while only 12% reported ambiguity on the policies. 11. Do you see yourself continuing to work for this organization two years from now? Table 2.1.11 Respondents Percentage Strongly Agree 11 22% Agree 35 70% Disagree 4 8% Strongly Disagree 0 0 Not Applicable 0 0 Total 50 100% 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 strongly agree Agree Disagree strongly disagree Not applicable
  63. 63. 63 A majority of 70% has agreed to continue to serve in the same organization for next two years, 22% are very much willing to do the same whereas a stricking 8% of the employees are those who are on the verge to leave the organization since they are not even commiting for next two years. 12. Do you recommend your friends/relatives in your organization? Table 2.1.12 Respondents Percentage Strongly Agree 12 24% Agree 34 68% Disagree 4 8% Strongly Disagree 0 0 Not Applicable 0 0 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 strongly agree Agree Disagree strongly disagree Not applicable
  64. 64. 64 Total 50 100% 24% of the sample surveyed strongly believe in recommending friends and relatives to their organizations, 68% agreed to this while 8% has disregarded the option. 13. Select and rank the following engagement tools applicable in your organization. Please rate the options, from 1- 8 (1 being the lowest and 8 being the highest). a) Stress Management b) Work life balance c) Career development d) Employees Participation in decision making e) Counseling/ Feedback f) Rewards and Recognition Schemes g) Employee Referral Scheme h) Retirement Plans 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 strongly agree Agree Disagree strongly disagree Not applicable
  65. 65. 65 Rewards and recognition schemes to be the most popular engagement tool amongst the employees, next is efforts on Career develoment. Employee participation in decision making and Counseling/ Feedback seem to be equally effective, next in line is Employee referral scheme. Stress management is then regarded as important but Retirement plans and Work life balance surprisingly seem to be of least effective. 3 3.5 3 6 4 5 7 4.5
  66. 66. 66 Chapter-3 Findings [Manager] 3.1 DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF HR MANAGERS: 1. Does your company have a clearly stated and published employment policy? Table 3.1.1 Percentage Yes 94% No 6%
  67. 67. 67 Total 100% Analysis: A whooping majority of 94% of the managers has agreed to the existence of a clearly stated and published employment policy and only 6% has denied it. 2. Does your company communicate its corporate goals to all employees? Table 3.1.2 Percentage Yes 100% No 0 Total 100% Yes 94% No 6%
  68. 68. 68 Analysis: Everyone (100%) has agreed on communicating corporate goals to all the employees. 3. Do you communicate what is expected out of the employee? Table 3.1.3 Percentage Yes 100% No 0 Yes 100% No 0%
  69. 69. 69 Total 100% Analysis: 100% positive response has been received when asked about whether the expectations are communicated to the employees. 4. What are the retention tools which have gained popularity amongst the employees? Please rate the options on a scale of 1 to 8, 1 being the lowest. Analysis: 100% 0% Yes No
  70. 70. 70 Employee participation in decision making to be the most popular engagement tool amongst the managers closely followed by Rewards and recognition schemes, next is efforts on Career develoment. Work life balance seem to be the next priority, next in line is Employee referral scheme. Stress management and Counseling/ Feedback are then regarded as important and Retirement plans surprisingly seem to be the least effective. 5. Are incentives linked to achievement of individual goals? Table 3.1.5 Percentage 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
  71. 71. 71 Yes 78% No 22% Total 100% Analysis: 78% of the managers have agreed to a close association of incentives and individual goals but 22% has denied any such association. 6. What factors of the rewards scheme contribute the most in retaining the employees? Please rate the options on a scale of 1 to 7, 1 being the lowest. a) Compensation and benefit programs b) Stock ownership and profit sharing c) Recognition programs d) Idea collection schemes linked to rewards for idea generation e) Long service and good performance awards f) Competitive compensation packages 78% 22% Yes No
  72. 72. 72 g) Material benefits like trips, food and discount coupons, etc. Analysis:  Compensation & Benefit programs are observed as the most effective rewards scheme closely followed by Competitive compensation packages. Idea collection scheme is the next important tool and Long service & good performance awards follow that.  Next in line is Stock ownership & Profit sharing. Material benefits and Recognition programs have come up as the least effective tools. 7. What are the activities you conduct to build the team-spirit in the organization? a) Small team recreational activities, such as cricket, trips to the cinema b) Social activities, such as family gatherings c) Community outreach activities such as volunteering and fund-raising d) Any other, please specify 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
  73. 73. 73 Analysis: Only two of the options have received some response when asked about the efforts in the areas of team building in the organization. Here Small team recreational activities are the most preferred way and some importance is given to Social activities in the organizations surveyed. 8. How often do you conduct training programs? Table 3.1.8 Percentage As per requirement 11% Monthly 22% Quarterly 56% Yearly 11% 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Small team recreational activities Social activities Community outreach activities Any other All of the above
  74. 74. 74 Total 100% Analysis: 56% of the organizations quarterly conduct training programs in their organization while 22% conduct it monthly and 11% of the sample surveyed conduct the training sessions as and when required. 11% of them also conduct it yearly. 9. At what level of hierarchy in the organization do you conduct these training programs? Table 3.1.9 Percentage Higher level 10% 11% 22% 56% 11% As per requirement Monthly Quaterly Yearly
  75. 75. 75 Middle level 8% Lower level 22% All of the above 60% Total 100% Analysis: 60% of the organizations conduct training session for each and every level of the employees while 8% of the organizations conduct it for Middle level and lower level of the employee’s while22% of the samples conduct it for higher level only. 10. What is the objective of training the employees? Higher level 10% Middle level 8% Lower level 22% All of the above 60%
  76. 76. 76 Analysis: A combination of all the options has scored the highest when asked about the objective of training the employees. Individually, enhancing the current skills as per the organization’s requirement, unleashing the hidden skills/ talent and updating them on the technological advancement have also scored well. 11. Is there a provision of flexibility in terms of working hours? Please tick the appropriate option. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
  77. 77. 77 a) Flex-time b) Telecommuting c) Job Sharing d) Any other Analysis: When questioned about providing flexibility in terms of working hours, maximum managers agreed to provide flex-time. Telecommuting, Job sharing, a combination of all these options and any other, each has scored equally. 12. Do you think the current engagement policies are effective in retaining the employees in the organization? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Flex-time Telecommuting Job sharing Any other All of the above
  78. 78. 78 Table 3.1.13 Percentage Yes 67% No 33% Total 100% Analysis: 67% of the managers agreed that the engagement strategies of their organization help in retaining the employees in the organization while 33% has disagreed on this fact. 13. What percent-decrease range have you observed due to the efforts in retaining employees? 67% 33% Yes No
  79. 79. 79 Half of the organizations observed 5-10% of retention due to the implementation of engagement strategies in the organizations and other half has observed 1-5% of retention due to the strategies followed. 14. In general, how do the employees respond to such engagement tools? 1 – 5 % 40% 5 – 10% 38% 10 & above 22%
  80. 80. 80 Analysis: 76% of the managers have observed positive effect on the employees of the engagement strategies while 16% said it is indifferent for the employees and 8% has responded negatively. 15. Have you come up with any innovative idea for retaining employees? Please mention. Analysis: Majority of the sample survey has not been able to come up with any of the innovative ideas in line with retaining employees 3.2 STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Chi-square test is used for analysis Positively 76% Negativeely 8% Indifferent 16%
  81. 81. 81 Null hypothesis: There is no retention of employees is dependent on the independent factors Alternate hypothesis: There is retention of employees is dependent on the independent factors Level of significance: 5% Degree of freedom=n-1=5-1=4 Total number of respondents = 3+25+6+15+1=50 Expected response (E) = (total number of respondents)/no of options=50/5=10 CHI-SQUARE(x2 ) = ∑*(Oi-Ei)2/Ei] Oi= observed frequency Ei= Expected frequency Value calculation of x2 Option Observed Frequency (Oi) Expected Frequency (Ei) (Oi-Ei) (Oi-Ei)2 (Oi-Ei)2 /E Strongly Agree 13 10 3 9 .9 Agree 25 10 15 225 22.5 Disagree 6 10 4 16 1.6 Strongly Disagree 5 10 -5 25 2.5 Not applicable 1 10 -9 81 8.1 ∑ *(Oi-Ei)2/Ei]=35.6 CHI-SQUARE(x2) =∑ *(Oi-Ei)2/Ei]]=35.6 Expected X2 value is 35.6
  82. 82. 82 So value of X2 is Degree of Freedom 4, at 5% level of significance is 9.49 X2 computed value = 35.6 X2 table value = 9.49 Null hypothesis is rejected so, There is retention of employees is dependent on the independent factors, Managers believed our employees retention dependent on independent factors so mostly employees agree in the Employee Engagement programs and retention strategy.
  83. 83. 83 CHAPTER-4 SUMMARY OF FINDINGS 4.1 SUMMARY OF FINDINGS
  84. 84. 84  Majority of the sample agreed to the fact they are aware about the work which they have to perform while few are strongly agreed and minimum of them given negative of this fact.  Most of the respondents get the opportunity to do best of their work every day while few of them responded not applicable.  Best part of respondents have received recognition or praise in the last three months for doing good work while minimum part of employees highly satisfied with their recognition in their organization last three months.  Generally people feel sense of belongings when someone is there at their workplace to support them and most of employees agreed on this fact while few of them disagreed.  Major percentage of employee’s participation in decision making is again a criterion of measuring employee engagement. More than 50% of respondents agreed their decision making seems to count.  Majority of sample agreed that their fellow employees are committed to do quality work while few of respondents given negatively.  Learning and Development is one of the most important aspects to find out the employee engagement in the organization. Mostly agreed aspect to find out the opportunity to learn and grow in the organization while few of them have given strongly agreed it.  Major part of respondents satisfied with pay and package of their organization while minimum of disagree on the competitive pay and benefit packages.  Greater part of employees believes that the promotions are done objectively, maximum given strongly agreed to the fairness of the same while few doubt the fairness and objectively of the process.  Best part of sample agreed to be clear on the policies that prevail in their respective organizations. A good proportion strongly agreed on the clarity while only minimum of them reported ambiguity on the policies.
  85. 85. 85  A majority of has agreed to continue to same organization for next two years, minimum of very much willing to do same whereas a sticking only few of them not even committing for next two years.  Great part of employees agreed to recommending friends and relatives to their organizations, minimum of them strongly believe while few of them disregarded the option.  Rewards and recognition schemes to be the most popular engagement tool amongst the employees, next is effort on Career development. Employee participation in decision making and Counselling/Feedback seem to be equally effective, next line is employee referral scheme. Stress management is then regarded as important but Retirement plan and work life balance surprisingly seem to be of least effective.  A majority of the managers has agreed to the existence of a clearly stated and published employment policy and only minimum has denied it.  Fully has given on communicating corporate goals to all the employees.  100% positive response has been received when asked about whether the expectations are communicated to the employees.  Majority of the manager have agreed to a close association of incentives and individual goals but few have denied any such association.  Compensation & benefit programs are observed as the most effective rewards scheme closely followed by Competitive compensation packages. Idea collection scheme is the next important tool and long service and good performance awards follow that.  Next in line is stock ownership and profit sharing. Material benefits and Recognition programs have come up as the least effective tools.  Only two of the options have received some response when asked about the efforts in the areas of team building in the organization.  Here small team recreational activities are the most preferred way and some improvement is given to social activities in the organizations surveyed.
  86. 86. 86  Best part of the organization quarterly conduct training programs in their organization while minimum conduct it monthly and few of the sample surveyed conduct the training sessions as and when required.  Majority of responses conducted training session for each and every level of the employees while few of conduct it for middle level and lower level of the employees while maximum of the sample conduct it for higher level only.  A combination of all the options has scored the highest when asked about the objective of training the employees. Individually, enhancing the currents skills as per the organizations requirements, unleashing the hidden skill/talent and updating them on the technological advancement have also scored well.  When questioned about providing flexibility in terms of working hours, mostly agreed to provide flex-time. Telecommuting, Job sharing, a combination of all these options and any others, each has scored equally.  Best part of answered observed 5-10% of retention due to the implementation of engagement strategies in the organizations and other half has observed 1-5% of retention due to the strategies followed.  Best part of the sample survey has not been able to come up with any of the innovative ideas in line with retaining employees.  Why because manager believed handled great strategies of employee engagement activities for employees.
  87. 87. 87 CHAPTER-5 CONCLUSION
  88. 88. 88 5.1 CONCLUSION  Employee engagement is attracting a great deal of interest from employers across numerous sectors. In some respects it is a very old aspiration- the desire by employers to find ways to increase employee motivation and to win more commitment to the job and the organization.  Employee engagement continues to remain a top priority at many organizations and one that companies increasingly view as a driver of business strategy.  Business – critical knowledge can walk out the door when an employee leaves the company. While employee retention figures have been used by companies as a measure of their performance in developing an effective organisation, this view of employee retention is not only outdated, but these figures may not be comprehensive enough to truly determine the organization’s effectiveness.  The concept of employee engagement is much complex than simply evaluating employee turnover from one year to the next.  In these figures of employee engagement can be somewhat misleading – it is not necessarily the number of employees an organization loses, it’s the number of top-performing employees that leave the company that should be of concern.  Management is one of the key reasons employees decide to stay or leave an organization. If there is high turnover among the management ranks, employees may also feel unstable in this ever- changing environment. Yet, on the other hand, it may not be the best business strategy to retain a manager that is disliked by employees.  The business strategy of employee retention actually lies with employee engagement; retention is an outcome of engagement. What most organizations fail to realize is that employee engagement is the biggest retention factor they have control over.  Engaged employees not only stay longer with the organizations, they are more productive, more reliable, make fewer errors, and take better care of customers. The business strategy of employee retention must incorporate methods that achieve a high level of employee engagement among the organizations top performers not necessarily the entire workforce.
  89. 89. 89  If effective engagement practices are in place, the organizations can curb the growing attrition rates especially in IT and banking sector. Thus the research study proves the significance of engagement activities as a part of retention strategy in an organization.  Nowadays it is very difficult to find fully engaged and satisfied employees. They are either stressed because of their personal problems or because of the working conditions. In SRF, the researcher found that the employees were by a large extent engaged about their work.  It must be further said that there must be a study to find out the correlation between their retention level and their productivity.
  90. 90. 90 5.2 SUGGESTIONS:-  As contrary to what managers believe that decision making is the most effective tool, the employees still prefer rewards and recognition. The Managers should focus on the stress management schemes in their organization.  Practically people don’t give much importance engagement activity programs, work life balance and retirement plans so there is scope of improvement this area.  To increase employee engagement, the organizations should:  Provide variety: boring, repetitive task can cause burn out and boredom over time. If the job requires repetitive task, look for ways to introduce variety by rotating duties, areas of responsibly, delivery of services etc.  Conduct periodic meetings with employees to communicate good news, challenges and easy-to-understand company financial information. Manager and supervisors should be comfortable communicating with their staff, and able to give and receive constructive feedback.  Make a fuss of in employee deployment if he feels he is not on the right job. Provide an open communication and environment.  Communicate openly and clearly about what’s expected of employees at every level-your vision, priorities, success measures, etc.  Get to now employees interests, goals, stressors, etc. shown an interest in their well-being and do what it takes enable them to feel more fulfilled and better balanced in work and life.  As we have got a very good response from employee so the companies should have the engagement strategies to retain the employees.
  91. 91. 91 BIBLIOGRAPHY:  the essential guide to employee engagement  Employee-Engagement-Impact-On-Business-Outcomes  Hr survey  what-is-employee-engagement  http://www.contentwriter.in/articles/hr/employee-engagement.htm  http://hromanager.com/blog/hr-metrics-series-i-employee-engagement/  http://www.insightory.com/view/503/employee_engagement__running_on_pe ople_power  http://www.thcu.ca/workplace/sat/pubs/sat_0076_v102.pdf  Srflimited.com  Citehr.com  EBooks/employee engagement
  92. 92. 92 QUESTIONNAIRE:- A STUDY ON EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT ACTIVITIES WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE SRF LIMITED CHENNAI Dear employees, I’m GUNASEKARAN.M doing MBA in national school of business, Bangalore. As a part of my academic curriculum I am doing this project on the above mentioned topic. I would be thankful to you for providing your valuable responses. This survey is purely conducted for academic purpose. The responses to this questionnaire will be kept strictly confidential. QUESTIONNAIRE FOR EMPLOYEES ORGANIZATION NAME DESIGNATION EMAIL ID 1. Do you know what is expected of you at work? a) Strongly Agree b) Agree c) Disagree d) Strongly Disagree e) Not Applicable 2. At work, do you have the opportunity to do what you do best every day? a) Strongly Agree b) Agree c) Disagree d) Strongly Disagree e) Not Applicable 3. In the last three months, have you received recognition or praise for doing good work? a) Strongly Agree b) Agree c) Disagree d) Strongly Disagree e) Not Applicable 4. Is there someone at work who encourages your development? a) Strongly Agree b) Agree c) Disagree d) Strongly Disagree e) Not Applicable 5. At work, do your opinions seem to count?
  93. 93. 93 a) Strongly Agree b) Agree c) Disagree d) Strongly Disagree e) Not Applicable 6. Are your associates (fellow employees) committed to doing quality work? a) Strongly Agree b) Agree c) Disagree d) Strongly Disagree e) Not Applicable 7. In the last year, have you had opportunities at work to learn and grow? a) Strongly Agree b) Agree c) Disagree d) Strongly Disagree e) Not Applicable 8. Are the pay and benefits in your organization comparable to similar companies? a) Strongly Agree b) Agree c) Disagree d) Strongly Disagree e) Not Applicable 9. Are job promotions in this organization fair and objective? a) Strongly Agree b) Agree c) Disagree d) Strongly Disagree e) Not Applicable 10. Are organization policies clearly communicated in the organization? a) Strongly Agree b) Agree c) Disagree d) Strongly Disagree e) Not Applicable 11. Do you see yourself continuing to work for this organization two years from now? a) Strongly Agree b) Agree c) Disagree d) Strongly Disagree e) Not Applicable 12. Do you recommend your friends/relatives in your organization? a) Strongly Agree b) Agree c) Disagree d) Strongly Disagree e) Not Applicable 13. Select and rank the following engagement tools applicable in your organization. Please rate the options, from 1- 8 (1 being the lowest and 8 being the highest). a) Stress Management b) Work life balance c) Career development d) Employees Participation in decision making e) Counseling/ Feedback f)Rewards and Recognition Schemes
  94. 94. 94 g) Employee Referral Scheme h) Retirement Plans QUESTIONNAIRE FOR HR MANAGERS: ORGANIZATION NAME DESIGNATION EMAIL ID 1. Does your company have a clearly stated and published employment policy? a. Yes b. No 2. Does your company communicate its corporate goals to all employees? a. Yes b. No 3. Do you communicate what is expected out of the employee? a. Yes b. No 4. What are the engagement tools which have gained popularity amongst the employees? Please rate the options on a scale of 1 to 8, 1 being the lowest. a. Stress Management b. Work life balance c. Career development d. Employees Participation in decision making e. Counselling/ Feedback f. Rewards and Recognition Schemes g. Employee Referral Scheme h. Retirement Plans 5. Are incentives linked to achievement of individual goals? a. Yes b. No 6. What factors of the rewards scheme contribute the most in engaging the employees? Please rate the options on a scale of 1 to 7, 1 being the lowest.

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