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Introduction to Sales Process

The Full introduction to sales process in 2017 including the key steps of starting and closing sales deal by using the best practice

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Introduction to Sales Process

  1. 1. Introduction to Sales Hany Sewilam AbdelHamid | 2017
  2. 2. Unit: Intro to Selling Professional salespeople go through seven steps when helping a customer make a purchase. 1. Approaching the customer 2. Determining needs 3. Presenting the product 4. Overcoming objections 5. Closing the sale 6. Suggestion selling 7. Relationship building In groups ,come up with a poem, rap or a jingle to help you remember these steps!
  3. 3. 3 The Sales Process Professional salespeople go through seven steps when helping a customer make a purchase. Steps of a Sale
  4. 4. 4 The Approach Approaching the Customer The approach is the first face-to-face contact with the customer. The approach sets the mood or atmosphere for the other steps of the sale. It has three purposes: to begin conversation to establish a relationship with the customer to focus on the merchandise Slide 1 of 2 Group 1
  5. 5. 5 The Approach Approaching the Customer When approaching the customer, follow these rules: Slide 2 of 2  Treat the customer as an individual.  Be perceptive about the customer’s buying style.  Be enthusiastic, courteous, and respectful.
  6. 6. 6 The Approach There are three methods you can use in the initial approach to retail customers: the service approach the greeting approach the merchandise approach The Approach in Retail Selling
  7. 7. 7 The Approach In the service approach method, the salesperson asks the customer if he or she needs assistance. This method is acceptable when the customer is obviously in a hurry or if you are an order taker for routine purchases. The Service Approach
  8. 8. 8 The Approach In the greeting approach method, the salesperson simply welcomes the customer to the store. This lets the customer know that the salesperson is available for any questions or assistance. The Greeting Approach
  9. 9. 9 The Approach In the merchandise approach method, the salesperson makes a comment or asks questions about a product in which the customer shows interest. This method can only be used if a customer stops to look at a specific item. The Merchandise Approach
  10. 10. 10 Interactive Activity Retail Approach Methods Service Approach Service Approach Greeting Approach Greeting Approach Merchandise Approach Merchandise Approach Hurried Customer Hurried Customer Routine Purchase Routine Purchase Browsing Customer Browsing Customer Fixated Customer Fixated Customer Group 1
  11. 11. 11 13.1 ASSESSMENT Reviewing Key Terms and Concepts 1. List the seven steps of a sale. 2. What are the purposes of the approach in selling? 3. Name the three approach methods retail salespeople use, and suggest when it is appropriate to use each method.
  12. 12. 12 SECTION 13.2 Determining Needs in Sales Customer needs are directly related to buying motives. Motives can be rational, emotional, or a combination of both. In this step of the sale, your job is to uncover the customer's reasons for wanting to buy. Determining Needs Group 2
  13. 13. 13 SECTION 13.2 Determining Needs in Sales How to Determine Needs Three methods will help you determine customer needs: observing listening questioning
  14. 14. 14 SECTION 13.2 Determining Needs in Sales Observing When you observe a customer, you look for buying motives that are communicated nonverbally. Nonverbal communication is expressing yourself through body language such as facial expressions, hand motions, and eye movement. In B2B selling, nonverbal communication can include the personal belongings in a buyer's office.
  15. 15. 15 SECTION 13.2 Determining Needs in Sales Listening helps you pick up clues to the customer's needs. Remember these five important listening skills when talking to your customers: Maintain good eye contact. Provide verbal and nonverbal feedback. Give customers your undivided attention. Listen with empathy and an open mind. Do not interrupt. Listening
  16. 16. 16 SECTION 13.2 Determining Needs in Sales In order to listen to customers, you must get them talking. One way of engaging a customer in conversation is to ask questions. Build your questions around words like: Questioning who what when where how why Slide 1 of 2
  17. 17. 17 SECTION 13.2 Determining Needs in Sales Do ask open-ended questions—questions that require more than a yes or no answer. Do ask clarifying questions to make sure you understand customers' needs. Don't ask too many questions in a row. Don't ask questions that might embarrass customers or put them on the defensive. Questioning Slide 2 of 2
  18. 18. 18 SECTION 13.2 Determining Needs in Sales Interactive Activity Slide 2 of 2 Group 2
  19. 19. 19 13.2 ASSESSMENT Reviewing Key Terms and Concepts 1. Why is determining needs an essential step in the sales process? 2. When should you begin determining needs in the sales process? 3. At what point in the sales process do you stop determining the customer's needs? 4. Name three methods used to determine customers' needs. Slide 1 of 2
  20. 20. 20 SECTION 14.1 Product Presentation During the product presentation phase of the sale, you show the product and tell about it. The goal of the product presentation is to match the customer's needs with appropriate product features and benefits. Product Presentation Group 3
  21. 21. 21 SECTION 14.1 Product Presentation Needs Show and Tell This is the step of the sale where you have the opportunity to share your expertise with the customer. At this point you must make the following decisions: Which products to show. What price range to offer. How many products to show. What to say.
  22. 22. 22 SECTION 14.1 Product Presentation Needs Make the Presentation Come Alive Planning is necessary for an effective product presentation. You must plan use the following four techniques:  Display and handle the product.  Demonstrate the product.  Use sales aids.  Involve the customer.
  23. 23. 23 SECTION 14.1 Product Presentation Needs Displaying and Handling the Product Creatively displaying the product is the first step in an eye-catching presentation. The way you handle a product presents an image of its quality. Handle it with respect and point out its features.
  24. 24. 24 SECTION 14.1 Product Presentation Needs Demonstrating the product in use helps to build customer confidence. Demonstrating Example: To prove that a fabric is water resistant, you can pour water on the garment.
  25. 25. 25 SECTION 14.1 Product Presentation Needs When it is impractical to demonstrate the actual product or when you want to emphasize certain selling points, you can use sales aids such as samples, audiovisual aids, models, photographs, drawings, charts, specification sheets, customer testimonials, and warranty information. Using Sales Aids
  26. 26. 26 SECTION 14.1 Product Presentation Needs Get the customer physically involved with the product as soon as possible in the sales presentation. Involving the Customer  Example: Have a customer hold and swing golf clubs. Involve the customer verbally by confirming selling points. When you involve a customer in the sale, you help the person make intelligent buying decisions.
  27. 27. 27 SECTION 14.1 Product Presentation Needs Interactive Activity Group 3
  28. 28. 28 14.1 ASSESSMENT Reviewing Key Terms and Concepts 1. What is the goal of the product presentation? 2. Which products and how many of them should be selected for the presentation? 3. Give some guidelines for what to say during the product presentation. 4. Describe four techniques that will make the product presentation lively and effective.
  29. 29. 29 SECTION 14.2 Handling Customer Objections Key Terms objections excuses paraphrase boomerang method superior point method third party method
  30. 30. 30 SECTION 14.2 Handling Customer Objections Objections are concerns, hesitations, doubts, or other honest reasons a customer has for not making a purchase. Objections give you an opportunity to present more information to the customer. Excuses are insincere reasons for not buying or not seeing the salesperson. Understanding Objections Group 4
  31. 31. 31 SECTION 14.2 Handling Customer Objections Welcome and Plan for Objections Objections can guide you in the sales process by helping you redefine the customer's needs and determine when the customer wants more information. Prepare yourself for most objections by completing an objection analysis sheet, which lists common objections and possible responses to them.
  32. 32. 32 SECTION 14.2 Handling Customer Objections Common Objections Most objections are based on key decisions the customer must make before buying: need product source price time Slide 1 of 3
  33. 33. 33 SECTION 14.2 Handling Customer Objections Common Objections Need The customer does not have an immediate need for the item or wants the item but does not truly need it. Product The customer is concerned about such things as construction, ease of use, quality, color, size, or style. Slide 2 of 3
  34. 34. 34 SECTION 14.2 Handling Customer Objections Source The customer has had negative past experiences with the firm or brand. Price The customer does not want to spend so much money. Time The customer is hesitant to buy immediately (sometimes an excuse). Common Objections Slide 3 of 3
  35. 35. 35 SECTION 14.2 Handling Customer Objections Successful salespeople have learned to use a very basic, four-step strategy when answering all objections: Four-Step Process for Handling Objections Slide 1 of 4 Listen Carefully Listen Carefully Acknowledge the Customer's Objections Acknowledge the Customer's Objections Restate the Objections Restate the Objections Answer the Objections Answer the Objections
  36. 36. 36 SECTION 14.2 Handling Customer Objections Listen Carefully To demonstrate sincere concern for your customer's objections, be attentive, maintain eye contact, and let the customer talk. Four-Step Process for Handling Objections Slide 2 of 4
  37. 37. 37 SECTION 14.2 Handling Customer Objections Acknowledge the Customer's Objections Acknowledging objections demonstrates that you understand and care about the customer's concerns. This makes a customer feel that his or her objections are understandable, valid, and worthy of further discussion. Four-Step Process for Handling Objections Slide 3 of 4
  38. 38. 38 SECTION 14.2 Handling Customer Objections Restate the Objections To be sure you understand the customer, paraphrase the objections (restate them in a different way), but don't change the meaning of the customer's objection. Answer the Objections Answer each objection tactfully. Think of yourself as a consultant, using the objections to further define or redefine the customer's needs. Four-Step Process for Handling Objections Slide 4 of 4
  39. 39. 39 SECTION 14.2 Handling Customer Objections There are six specialized methods for handling objections:  boomerang  question  superior point  denial  demonstration  third party Specialized Methods of Handling Objections
  40. 40. 40 SECTION 14.2 Handling Customer Objections Superior Point Admit disadvantages in certain products but then present superior points to offset or compensate for them. This technique puts the customer in a position to decide between the different features and see additional reasons for buying. Specialized Methods of Handling Objections
  41. 41. 41 SECTION 14.2 Handling Customer Objections Denial When a customer's objection is based on misinformation, provide proof and accurate information to answer the objection. Demonstration Demonstrate a product's features (but make sure they work before using them in a sales situation). Third Party Use a testimonial from a previous customer or another neutral person. Specialized Methods of Handling Objections
  42. 42. 42 SECTION 14.2 Handling Customer Objections Boomerang Use a friendly, helpful tone to explain how the objection is really a selling point. Question Question the customer—but never in an abrupt manner—to learn more about the objections. Specialized Methods of Handling Objections
  43. 43. 43 SECTION 14.2 Handling Customer Objections Interactive Activity Group 4
  44. 44. 44 14.2 ASSESSMENT Reviewing Key Terms and Concepts 1. Distinguish between objections and excuses. 2. Why should you welcome objections in the sales process? 3. Name the five buying decisions upon which common objections are based. 4. List the four steps involved in the process for handling customer objections. 5. Name six specific methods of handling objections.
  45. 45. 45 SECTION 15.1 Customer Buying Signals Key Terms closing the sale buying signals trial close which close standing-room-only close direct close service close
  46. 46. 46 SECTION 15.1 Customer Buying Signals Closing the sale is obtaining positive agreement from the customer to buy. All your efforts up to this step of the sale have involved helping your customer make buying decisions. Closing the Sale Group 5
  47. 47. 47 SECTION 15.1 Customer Buying Signals Timing the Close Close the sale when your customer is ready to buy. Some customers are ready to buy sooner than others, therefore you must be flexible.
  48. 48. 48 SECTION 15.1 Customer Buying Signals Buying Signals Look for buying signals, the things a customer does that indicate a readiness to buy, such as facial expressions, actions, and comments.  Example: A customer is holding merchandise and smiling, or making comments that imply ownership.
  49. 49. 49 SECTION 15.1 Customer Buying Signals Trial Close A trial close is an initial effort to close a sale. Attempt a trial close to test the readiness of the customer and your interpretation of a positive buying signal.
  50. 50. 50 SECTION 15.1 Customer Buying Signals You will find it easier to attempt trial closes and to close more sales if you follow a few simple guidelines:  Recognize opportunities.  Help customers make a decision.  Create an ownership mentality.  Don't talk too much.  Don't rush a customer. General Rules for Closing the Sale Slide 1 of 3
  51. 51. 51 SECTION 15.1 Customer Buying Signals Recognize Closing Opportunities Use major objections that have been resolved to close the sale. Take advantage of high customer interest after a dramatic presentation. Help Customers Make a Decision When a customer is having difficulty making a buying decision, stop showing additional merchandise and remove those things that are no longer of interest. General Rules for Closing the Sale Slide 2 of 3
  52. 52. 52 SECTION 15.1 Customer Buying Signals Create an Ownership Mentality Use words that indicate ownership, such as you and your. Look for minor agreements from the customer on selling points. Don’t Talk Too Much If you think the customer is ready to make a buying decision, stop talking about the product. Don’t Rush a Customer Be patient, courteous, polite, and helpful. General Rules for Closing the Sale Slide 3 of 3
  53. 53. 53 SECTION 15.1 Customer Buying Signals Certain selling situations warrant the use of specialized methods:  which close  standing-room-only close  direct close  service close Specialized Methods for Closing the Sale Slide 1 of 3
  54. 54. 54 SECTION 15.1 Customer Buying Signals Which Close Encourage a customer to make a decision between two items. Standing-Room-Only close Use this when a product is in short supply or when the price will be going up in the near future. Specialized Methods for Closing the Sale Slide 2 of 3  Example: “This is the last pair of shoes I have in your size.”
  55. 55. 55 SECTION 15.1 Customer Buying Signals Direct Close Ask for the sale with non-threatening questions or statements that get the customer ready for the close. Specialized Methods for Closing the Sale Slide 3 of 3 Service Close Offer services that overcome obstacles or problems: gift-wrapping, a return policy, special sales arrangements, warranties and guarantees, bonuses or premiums, and credit or payment terms.  Example: "Based on what I've shown you, how do you feel about this product?"
  56. 56. 56 SECTION 15.1 Customer Buying Signals Don't despair if your initial attempts to close a sale are unsuccessful. Invite the customer to shop in your store again. Remember that even a customer who does not make a purchase is still a prospect for future business. Failure to Close the Sale
  57. 57. 57 SECTION 15.1 The Close Interactive Activity Group 5 Service Close Standing- Room-Only Close Closing The Sale Closing The Sale Which Close Direct Close
  58. 58. 58 15.1 ASSESSMENT Reviewing Key Terms and Concepts 1. What are customer buying signals? 2. When is the right time to close a sale? 3. Provide examples of the following closing methods: which close, standing-room-only close, direct close, and service close 4. Why is the failure to close not a true failure?
  59. 59. 59 SECTION 15.2 Effective Selling Key Terms suggestion selling relationship marketing
  60. 60. 60 SECTION 15.2 Effective Selling Suggestion selling is selling additional goods or services to the customer, items that will ultimately save time and money or make the original purchase more enjoyable. Suggestion Selling Group 6
  61. 61. 61 SECTION 15.2 Effective Selling Benefits of Suggestion Selling  Suggestion selling benefits salespeople because customers will want to do business with them again.  Suggestion selling benefits customers because they are more pleased with the purchase.  Suggestion selling benefits the company because it saves time and increases profit.
  62. 62. 62 SECTION 15.2 Effective Selling Five Rules of Suggestion Selling 1. Do suggestion selling after the customer has made a commitment to buy, but before payment is made or the order written. 2. Make your recommendation from the customer's point of view and give at least one reason for your suggestion. 3. Make the suggestion definite, rather than asking, “Will that be all?” Slide 1 of 2
  63. 63. 63 SECTION 15.2 Effective Selling Rules of Suggestion Selling 4. Show the item you are suggesting. Don’t just talk about it. 5. Make the suggestion positive. “This scarf will complement your coat beautifully.” Slide 2 of 2
  64. 64. 64 SECTION 15.2 Effective Selling There are three methods used in suggestion selling:  offering related merchandise  recommending larger quantities  calling attention to special sales opportunities Suggestion Selling Methods Slide 1 of 4
  65. 65. 65 SECTION 15.2 Effective Selling Offering Related Merchandise Related merchandise can increase the use or enjoyment of the customer’s original purchase. Introducing related merchandise is probably the easiest and most effective suggestion selling method. Suggestion Selling Methods Slide 2 of 4
  66. 66. 66 SECTION 15.2 Effective Selling Recommending Larger Quantities This usually works in retail settings when selling inexpensive items or when money, time, and/or convenience will be saved. In business-to-business sales, purchasing larger quantities allows customers to take advantage of discounts. Suggestion Selling Methods Slide 3 of 4
  67. 67. 67 SECTION 15.2 Effective Selling Calling Attention to Special Sales Opportunities Salespeople are obligated to communicate special sales opportunities to their customers. Some opportunities include: the arrival of new merchandise special sales holidays Suggestion Selling Methods Slide 4 of 4
  68. 68. 68 SECTION 15.2 Effective Selling Relationship marketing involves the strategies businesses use to stay close to their customers. Think of after-sale activities as part of an ongoing dialogue with customers in preparation for future sales. Relationship Marketing  Example: Harley Davidson’s club for motorcycle owners offers insurance and travel assistance.
  69. 69. 69 SECTION 15.2 Effective Selling Take payment or the order with courtesy. Work quickly to complete the paperwork. Avoid saying or doing anything to irritate your customer at this stage of the sale. Taking Payment/Taking the Order
  70. 70. 70 SECTION 15.2 Effective Selling Before the customer departs or before you leave your client's office:  Reassure the person of their wise buying choices.  Take the time to educate your customer about any special care or specific instructions for their purchase.  Thank the customer, even if they don’t buy. Departure
  71. 71. 71 SECTION 15.2 Suggestion Selling Interactive Activity Group 6
  72. 72. 72 15.2 ASSESSMENT Reviewing Key Terms and Concepts 1. What is suggestion selling, and why is it important? 2. Suggest two rules for suggestion selling. 3. Identify three methods used for suggestion selling. 4. What is relationship marketing and how is it related to the sales process? 5. Why are after-sale activities (such as departure, follow-up, and evaluation) important?

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