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Jisc GDPR conference

by David Reeve

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Jisc GDPR conference

  1. 1. Jisc GDPR Conference04/01/2018 1
  2. 2. Getting to grips with GDPR David Reeve, Head of information strategy, Jisc 04/01/2018 2Getting to grips with GDPR
  3. 3. 04/01/2018 3 Global spend estimated at $300 to $500 billion combating the bug Getting to grips with GDPR
  4. 4. GDPR coverage in the newspapers 04/01/2018 4 “Banks could be stung for €5bn under GDPR, screams latest report on industry readiness” “Fears data protection rules could close small firms”“Last year’s ICO would be 79 times higher under GDPR: TalkTalk’s £400,000 penalty was big – how about £59 MILLION?” “Worldwide climate of fear over GDPR data compliance claims veritas study” “Cyber insurance ‘unlikely to cover massive GDPR fines’ ” “Last year’s ICO fines would soar to £69 million post – GDPR”” Getting to grips with GDPR
  5. 5. 04/01/2018 5Getting to grips with GDPR
  6. 6. The dangers of running projects based on FEAR 04/01/2018 6 “I am a GDPR expert offering consultancy” There is no case law or enforcement actions to offer compliance guidance. We don’t know yet what the final GDPR will look like so how can you be an expert…be sceptical!! ££££££££££ “You can buy our GDPR solutions now” “Our product will make you compliant” There are some solutions that can help with auditing but there is no miraculous product that will make you compliant simply by purchasing and installing it. ££££££££££ “After Brexit the GDPR won’t apply to the UK” Recent survey revealed 44% of firms think the regulation will not apply to UK business after Brexit UK bring this into law by 25 May 2018 and a new bill is going through Parliament for post Brexit. £££££££££ Information Commissioner’s Office: Don’t focus on fines regime “focus on risk, transparency, control and accountability” There is no silver bullet technology solution. GDPR is still an unknown so claims of compliance is premature. ££££££££ Getting to grips with GDPR
  7. 7. Implementing GDPR 04/01/2018 7 Jan 2017 May 2018 Not applicable to Jisc 11. Children (ICO Step 8) 12. International (ICO Step 12 Dec 2017 Getting to grips with GDPR
  8. 8. Where to go for help » Information Commissioner’s Office: (https://ico.org.uk/) » Article 29Working Group: (https://edps.europa.eu/) » Legal changes: Number of free sites including: Bird and Bird guide to the GDPR (http://ji.sc/two-birds- data-protection) » Sector guidance and advice: (jisc.ac.uk/gdpr) 04/01/2018 8Getting to grips with GDPR
  9. 9. Links to Jisc blogs Step 1: Awareness GDPR: Alumni Process (http://ji.sc/regulatory-developments-alumni) Data Protection Bill and Public Authorities (http://ji.sc/gdprdata-protection) Step 2: Information we hold GDPR: Information Lifecycle Registers (http://ji.sc/gdpr-moving-information) Service Categories (http://ji.sc/gdpr-service-categories) Step 4: Individual rights Portability Rights and Data Protection Challenges (http://ji.sc/portability-right-data-protection) GDPR: Backups, Archives and the Right to Erasure (http://ji.sc/gdpr-backups-archives) 04/01/2018 9Getting to grips with GDPR
  10. 10. Links to Jisc blogs Step 6: Legal basis for processing personal data What'sYour Justification? (http://ji.sc/gdpr-whats-your-justification) Web forms and consent (http://ji.sc/gdpr-web-forms-and-consent) GDPR: Student Unions (http://ji.sc/gdpr-student-unions) Service categories (http://ji.sc/gdpr-service-categories) Step 7: Consent GDPR: A New Kind of Consent (http://ji.sc/gdpr-new-kind-of-consent) Step 9: Data breaches Incident Response and GDPR (http://ji.sc/incident-response-and-gdpr) 04/01/2018 10Getting to grips with GDPR
  11. 11. What you should be doing now – top 10 tips 1. Get support …put together a GDPR implementation task force 2. Conduct an audit of what personal data the organisation holds, how it is being used, to whom it is being disclosed and to where it is being transferred 3. TheGDPR advocates taking a risk based approach; through the audit identify your systems and services that present most risk and focus on mitigating these 4. Start reviewing data protection clauses used (both for templates and live negotiations) in supplier agreements to include the mandatoryGDPR clauses 5. Review breach notification and management systems and procedures, including draft notification forms for both notifications to the supervisory authority and affected individuals 6. Review IT systems and internal processes to ensure that an individual's data can be captured both for the purpose of data portability (ie passing a copy to the data subject or another controller), but also to enable such data to be deleted easily when no longer needed 7. Review and update student and staff privacy notices to reflect the new transparency requirements of theGDPR 8. Develop a template DPIA to be used in any high risk projects with a checklist of when to apply 9. Review existing processes and procedures for subject access requests, including the development of template response forms and assessing whether the one-month response deadline could be met 10. Start putting together training materials to raise staff awareness of the new rules under the GDPR 04/01/2018 11Getting to grips with GDPR
  12. 12. Final thought “Don’t forget that 25th May 2018 is…… 04/01/2018 12 Day one” Getting to grips with GDPR
  13. 13. jisc.ac.uk David Reeve Head of information strategy 04/01/2018 13Getting to grips with GDPR
  14. 14. Practical applications of GDPR for FE JoeYeadon, GodalmingCollege, jxy@godalming.ac.uk 04/01/2018 14Practical applications of GDPR for FE
  15. 15. Practical applications of GDPR for FE About Godalming College: »Sixth Form College in SW Surrey »2100 full-time 16-19 students »<50 14-16 from local schools »Turnover c £9m, 250 staff »In-house MIS, online systems »Planning conversion to Sixth FormAcademy 04/01/2018 15Practical applications of GDPR for FE
  16. 16. Practical applications of GDPR for FE About me: »Worked in FE since 2001 »Responsible for IT and MIS at Godalming College › ILR, SQL Reporting, Software, etc »Data Protection Officer »Dealt with DP Breach in 2011 »No formal DP qualifications! 04/01/2018 16 JoeYeadon Practical applications of GDPR for FE
  17. 17. Where to start? »Look at the “12 Steps”, JISC website and ICO guidance – it’s free! »Work out where you are – it might be better than you think! »Read the Data Protection Bill (and EU Reg 2016/679) »Work out where you need to be »Have a data security breach (or just panic – whichever you prefer) “I’m in FE – where do I start with this GDPR-fangled thing?” 04/01/2018 17Practical applications of GDPR for FE
  18. 18. Where to start? 04/01/2018 18 1. Awareness – make sure the College boss knows about GDPR 2. Document – what Personal Information have you got and where is it? 3. Communication – how do your staff/students etc know? 4. Rights – Retention policy, erasure procedure etc 5. SAR – procedures/policy – need a mechanism 6. Lawful basis – statutory duty (Education & Skills Act etc) 7. Consent – to consent or not consent, that is the question 8. Children – what age are the Data Subjects? 9. Breaches – have a procedure 10. Design – ‘Data Protection by Design’ 11. Data Protection Officer – you need one! 12. International - (EU – identify the lead authority etc) 12Stepsto GDPR Practical applications of GDPR for FE
  19. 19. Good News for FE »Most College activity is covered by Statutory Duty – contract rather than consent »Very little automated processing (if any) »UK implementation of GDPR gives lower age limit for consent »Most data is only collected for a specific purpose »Generally, the same sorts of things which make Colleges work well involve centralisation of data »Generally, there’s already expertise »Generally, there’s no cross-border transfer of Personal Information 04/01/2018 19Practical applications of GDPR for FE
  20. 20. Where did we start? »DPO in place already – reporting to Principal, will report to Governors. Experience of Breach management »Good Data Protection Policy already, revamped forGDPR (draft) »In-house MIS › Logs of communication, scanned documents, no student files › Staff, Student and Parent Portals »Reasonable culture of contract and consent › We can’t perform our legal duty without Personal Information, but we already seek consent for publicity purposes 04/01/2018 20 Godalming College’s approach (1/2) Practical applications of GDPR for FE
  21. 21. Where did we start? »Use networks › S7 Group of Sixth Form College › Principals’ group, MIS managers, new Data Protection Group › JISC, ICO webinars »Use common-sense › Read the Directive, read the Bill, look around the College »Get the ‘management’ on-board »Write the policy – get some momentum in the right direction 04/01/2018 21 Godalming College’s approach (2/2) Practical applications of GDPR for FE
  22. 22. Where to start? »Lack of experience with GDPR › Nobody has been tested yet! »Hype – consultants want it to sound difficult »Unclear guidance on data retention »Possibly need new systems to deal with Subject Access? »Silo mentality – ‘department spreadsheet’, mark-books, separate systems for teaching & learning … “OK – that sounds easy, what’s the catch?” 04/01/2018 22Practical applications of GDPR for FE
  23. 23. Where are we? “So what’s the problem?” 04/01/2018 23 »Hype –worrying the boss »Safeguarding – guidance is confusing (age 25, indefinitely?) »What about UCAS references 10 years-on, COSHH 40 years..? »Do emails referencing personal information stored elsewhere form part of the record? (Confusing advice) »Is CCTV Personal Information? »Information stored/backed-up in the Cloud, paper and tape »Perception about ‘right to erasure’, education exemptions Practical applications of GDPR for FE
  24. 24. Where are we? Godalming College – progress to date 04/01/2018 24 »Read the documentation, drafted the policy, revised the NFP »Network – S7 Data Protection group, consulted JISC › Worked out who the real experts are in the network »Senior ManagementTeam meetings – clarifying and refining »Identified need to clarify how data is deleted »Identified need to develop a one-stop-SAR-shop »Inset activities planned Practical applications of GDPR for FE
  25. 25. »GDPR in FE isn’t necessarily difficult »We are all travelling in the right direction »There’s still some confusion of the detail »Engage with Senior Managers – appoint a DPO if you haven’t already »Review, refresh DP statements and policies – and communicate 04/01/2018 25 In summary… Summary Practical applications of GDPR for FE
  26. 26. jisc.ac.uk JoeYeadon Head of ILT services Godalming College jxy@godalming.ac.uk 04/01/2018 26Practical applications of GDPR for FE
  27. 27. Break 04/01/2018 27
  28. 28. Developing an information asset register from scratch Rachael Maguire, Records Manager, London School of Economics 04/01/2018 28Developing an information asset register from scratch
  29. 29. Developing an information asset register »Why develop an information asset register? › Why not before now? –Not covered by Crown Copyright › GDPR Article 30 requirements › Internal requirements –Data Licences agreements –Secure destruction –Better records management 04/01/2018 29Developing an information asset register from scratch
  30. 30. Developing an information asset register »Article 30 requires: » Each controller and, where applicable, the controller’s representative, shall maintain a record of processing activities under its responsibility.That record shall contain all of the following information: › the name and contact details of the controller and, where applicable, the joint controller, the controller’s representative and the data protection officer; › the purposes of the processing; › a description of the categories of data subjects and of the categories of personal data; › the categories of recipients to whom the personal data have been or will be disclosed including recipients in third countries or international organisations; › where applicable, transfers of personal data to a third country or an international organisation, including the identification of that third country or international organisation and, in the case of transfers referred to in the second subparagraph of Article 49(1), the documentation of suitable safeguards; › where possible, the envisaged time limits for erasure of the different categories of data; › where possible, a general description of the technical and organisational security measures referred to in Article 32(1). 04/01/2018 30Developing an information asset register from scratch
  31. 31. Developing an information asset register How did we go about creating the IAR? »CheckedTNA guidance »Looked at other examples. What was useful to us?What was worth borrowing? »Developing the specification »Refining what the fields should be called »Getting sign off through the committees 04/01/2018 31Developing an information asset register from scratch
  32. 32. Developing an information asset register Our IAR includes: » Core fields – name, owner, description, retention » Information Security fields – access, classification, security measures » Business continuity fields – risks to asset, support contacts, backup » Data protection fields – what sort of personal data, lawful basis, data processor » Publication fields – is the asset published and if so where » Data licence agreements – restrictions of use, renewal date » Systems/unstructured collections 04/01/2018 32Developing an information asset register from scratch
  33. 33. Developing an information asset register Asset Type Asset Name Asset Description No. of Records Retention Retention Trigger Location Asset Platform Owner Business Area Data Collection Activity Physical, Electronic, Database, Office PC, Mobile Device What is the asset called. Sometimes this will be a database name e.g. SITS, sometimes it will be a description of a collection e.g. personnel files. Short description of what information the asset contains How many records are held within the asset? This may be shelf metres, number of records in a database, size in KB/GB/TB, etc How long should the information asset be kept - NOTE Permanent should only be used on guidance of LSE Archivist What causes the disposal/archiving of the information asset Where is the information asset? In general, we would want a specific room number or drive or cloud storage name. What software manages the information asset e.g. Oracle, proprietary system and/or the format e.g. Word. Excel Who is responsible for managing the information asset Department/ Division/ Centre and sub team if necessary E.g. ongoing, ceased Electronic Data Protection request case files The case files for DP requests, organised by DP number 26.2MB 7 years Last action on case file P Drive Mainly Word, some Excel, pdf and email Rachael Maguire Secretary's Division, Legal Team Ongoing 04/01/2018 33Developing an information asset register from scratch
  34. 34. Developing an Information Asset Register Getting the IAR filled out »We have started! »An Excel template, two examples »Already filled out by a couple of units at the School, only 140 to go »Aiming for finishing this by end of January 2018 04/01/2018 34Developing an information asset register from scratch
  35. 35. Developing an information asset register Next steps »Where are we keeping the data gathered? »Spreadsheet, SharePoint or database? »How will we keep it updated? 04/01/2018 35Developing an information asset register from scratch
  36. 36. jisc.ac.uk Rachael Maguire Records Manager London School of Economics r.e.maguire@lse.ac.uk 04/01/2018 36Developing an information asset register from scratch
  37. 37. Simplifying GDPR Andrew Cormack, Chief regulatory adviser, (@Janet_LegReg) 04/01/2018 37Simplifying GDPR
  38. 38. The challenge… 04/01/2018 Smileys © Chris/Chrkl https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/SMirC >80 pages of law >120 Jisc services <150 days to go 38Simplifying GDPR
  39. 39. Need to simplify 04/01/2018 39 Where to start? What’s needed? How to explain it? How to incorporate late guidance? Simplifying GDPR
  40. 40. Where to start? 04/01/2018 40Simplifying GDPR
  41. 41. Scary services 04/01/2018 41 We may not be able to contact all data subjects They’re complicated They probably need individual treatment Simplifying GDPR
  42. 42. Service categories Risk level Relationship Example 1 Service provider has direct interaction with user helpdesk Risk-based guide to prioritisation/resource 04/01/2018 42Simplifying GDPR
  43. 43. Service categories Risk level Relationship Example 1 Service provider has direct interaction with user helpdesk 2 Service provider has direct long-term relationship with user eduroam site contact Risk-based guide to prioritisation/resource 04/01/2018 43Simplifying GDPR
  44. 44. Service categories Risk level Relationship Example 1 Service provider has direct interaction with user helpdesk 2 Service provider has direct long-term relationship with user eduroam site contact 3 User has relationship with third party eduroam user Risk-based guide to prioritisation/resource 04/01/2018 44Simplifying GDPR
  45. 45. Service categories Risk level Relationship Example 1 Service provider has direct interaction with user helpdesk 2 Service provider has direct long-term relationship with user eduroam site contact 3 User has relationship with third party eduroam user 4 User may be unaware of service’s existence incident response Risk-based guide to prioritisation/resource 04/01/2018 45Simplifying GDPR
  46. 46. Bundles Groups of services likely to use same approach 04/01/2018 46 Type 1 (direct interaction): enquiry/response/done Helpdesk-like Type 2 (direct relationship): join/nominate/use SiteLicence-like Type 2 (as above) for site contact Type 3 (indirect relationship) for users FedAuth-like More…? Simplifying GDPR
  47. 47. What’s needed? 04/01/2018 47Simplifying GDPR
  48. 48. GDPR instruments Sources of assurance to provider and user… 04/01/2018 48 • Explain key points to data subjects User-friendly privacy notice • Assign legal responsibilities among partners Contractual terms and conditions • Understand/document non-obvious legal bases Legal analysis • Analyse risks (to individuals) and mitigations of processing Data Protection Impact Assessment Simplifying GDPR
  49. 49. Service categories Risk-based guide to prioritisation/resource 04/01/2018 50 Risk level Relationship Example Privacy notice? Contract? Legal basis test? DPIA? 1 Service provider has direct interaction with user helpdesk 2 Service provider has direct long-term relationship with user eduroam site contact 3 User has relationship with third party eduroam user 4 User may be unaware of service’s existence incident response Simplifying GDPR
  50. 50. Service categories Risk-based guide to prioritisation/resource 04/01/2018 51 Risk level Relationship Example Privacy notice? Contract? Legal basis test? DPIA? 1 Service provider has direct interaction with user helpdesk  X X X 2 Service provider has direct long-term relationship with user eduroam site contact 3 User has relationship with third party eduroam user 4 User may be unaware of service’s existence incident response Simplifying GDPR
  51. 51. Service categories Risk level Relationship Example Privacy notice? Contract? Legal basis test? DPIA? 1 Service provider has direct interaction with user helpdesk  X X X 2 Service provider has direct long-term relationship with user eduroam site contact  ?  X 3 User has relationship with third party eduroam user 4 User may be unaware of service’s existence incident response Risk-based guide to prioritisation/resource 04/01/2018 52Simplifying GDPR
  52. 52. Service categories Risk level Relationship Example Privacy notice? Contract? Legal basis test? DPIA? 1 Service provider has direct interaction with user helpdesk  X X X 2 Service provider has direct long-term relationship with user eduroam site contact  ?  X 3 User has relationship with third party eduroam user    ? 4 User may be unaware of service’s existence incident response Risk-based guide to prioritisation/resource 04/01/2018 53Simplifying GDPR
  53. 53. Service categories Risk level Relationship Example Privacy notice? Contract? Legal basis test? DPIA? 1 Service provider has direct interaction with user helpdesk  X X X 2 Service provider has direct long-term relationship with user eduroam site contact  ?  X 3 User has relationship with third party eduroam user    ? 4 User may be unaware of service’s existence incident response  ?   Risk-based guide to prioritisation/resource 04/01/2018 54Simplifying GDPR
  54. 54. How to explain? 04/01/2018 55Simplifying GDPR
  55. 55. Privacy notices Master Notice » Retention, transfers, exports, security, exercising rights »For each of › “service you’ve requested” › “identify problems or improvements” › “you asked us to” › “operating service for 3rd party” Jisc service approach, pending regulator guidance 04/01/2018 56 Per-service notice (at point of collection) » Purpose(s), link to master » [Recipients/countries, directories, ISO27001, DPIA, other options] »For each of › Transaction-based (eg helpdesk) › Relationship-based (eg subscription) › Consent-based (eg survey) jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice Simplifying GDPR
  56. 56. Initial thoughts on employee data 04/01/2018 57Simplifying GDPR
  57. 57. Possible employment activity categories Same relationship with all, so now based on data type 04/01/2018 58 Risk level Type of data Example Privacy notice? Contract? Legal basis test? DPIA? 1 Optional Social chatter  X X X 3 Mandatory, non-sensitive data IT, HR    ? 4 Sensitive data (inc.financial) Payroll, medical  ?   Simplifying GDPR
  58. 58. Possible employee privacy notices Work-in-progress… 04/01/2018 59 Master Notice » Retention, transfers, exports, security, exercising rights »For each of › “purposes of employment” › “law requires us to” › Vital interests › “identify problems or improvements” › “you asked us to” Per-service notice (at point of collection) » Purpose(s), link to master » [Other options] »Not (only) at point of collection › That could be many years ago › Probably a role for context-awareness › eg reminders on communications? jisc.ac.uk/website/privacy-notice Simplifying GDPR
  59. 59. References Regulators: » https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/data-protection-reform/ (UK) » http://ec.europa.eu/newsroom/just/item-detail.cfm?item_id=50083 (EU) Regulation (2016/679/EU): »http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32016R0679 Me: » https://community.jisc.ac.uk/blogs/regulatory-developments/article/gdpr- service-categories » https://community.jisc.ac.uk/blogs/regulatory-developments/article/gdpr- privacy-notices 04/01/2018 60Simplifying GDPR
  60. 60. jisc.ac.uk Thanks Andrew Cormack Chief regulatory adviser, Jisc technologies Andrew.Cormack@jisc.ac.uk http://ji.sc/data-protection- regulationblog 04/01/2018 61Simplifying GDPR
  61. 61. Lunch 04/01/2018 62
  62. 62. Student data and GDPR: what are their rights? Paul Duller, IM consultancy director, services and solutions,Tribal 04/01/2018 63
  63. 63. Student Data and the GDPR: What are their rights? Dr Paul Duller IM Consultancy Director Tribal Group plc 6th December, 2017 Tribal Group plc
  64. 64. Tribal and the GDPR TRIBAL provides services and technology to the education sector. Many of our customers, rely on TRIBAL to manage, host and process their student and staff data. As such, data protection is at the heart of everything we do. We are committed to ensuring that our systems, services and staff fully comply with the GDPR (and that our clients do too!). We are also delighted to be the sole sponsor today’s conference. Tribal Group plc 65
  65. 65. Agenda 1. Overview 2. The Principles 3. Students Rights 4. The Guide for Students Tribal Group plc 66
  66. 66. 1. Overview Tribal Group plc 67
  67. 67. The GDPR is the biggest change to Data Protection Law in 20 years …..
  68. 68. GDPR FINES: Up to €20M or 4% of global turnover Tribal Group plc 69
  69. 69. The Timeframe Effects personal data of all EU citizens Fines for Non complianc e NEW Appointment Data Protection Officer Starting point: Review, audit & report Plan & provision for resources and time Appoint a GDPR Champion Most activity is compliance-led Discussion focused on what you and your team needs to know, but not necessarily what your students need to know. Tribal Group plc 70 This paper presents a more student-centric view of the GDPR, and forms the basis of a student-friendly pocket book on GDPR, available in Jan 2018.
  70. 70. 1. The Principles Tribal Group plc 71
  71. 71. General Data Protection Regulation •Replaces the UK Data Protection Act •Effects any EU based organisation processing personal data, and •Effects any organisation processing personal data or trading with individuals within the EU. 2018 GDPR comes into force on the 25th May 2018 Tribal Group plc 72
  72. 72. What is Personal Data? (Article 4(1)) Tribal Group plc 73 Personal data is any data relating to a living individual who is or can be identified directly or indirectly from the data. • The GDPR applies to both automated personal data and to manual filing systems. • Personal data that have been pseudonymised are within the scope of the GDPR, however anonymised data is not. • Personal data relating to criminal convictions & offences are not covered by GDPR (Article 10)
  73. 73. What is Processing? (Article 4(2)) Tribal Group plc 74 Processing is almost every act relating to personal data. “Processing means any operation or set of operations which is performed on personal data or on sets of personal data, whether or not by automated means, such as collection, recording, organization, structuring, storage, adaptation or alteration, retrieval, consultation, use, disclosure by transmission, dissemination or otherwise making available, alignment or combination, restriction, erasure or destruction.” Collection Storage Use Transfer Retention & Destruction Personal data lifecycle The GDPR applies to both electronic personal data processing and to manual filing systems.
  74. 74. Where is my data processed? Tribal Group plc 75 It no longer matters if the data processing takes place within the European Union or not, as long as data of natural persons in the Union are processed. This is an important advance for the privacy of individuals. In the past, major internet giants like Google and Amazon could escape European privacy laws as they had a headquarters in Silicon Valley. Now the GDPR will also apply to them as soon as they process personal data of European residents.
  75. 75. The GDPR Principles (Article 5(1))  A key objective of the GDPR is to protect and strengthen the rights of data subjects.  In general, the GDPR builds on existing data protection principles and adds tighter obligations and restrictions on businesses.  The GDPR does not have principles relating to individuals’ rights or the overseas transfer of personal data. These are addressed in separate sections of the GDPR legislation.  The GDPR features new accountability and documentation duty (comply and be able to demonstrate compliance)
  76. 76. 1. Processed lawfully, fairly and in a transparent manner 2. Collected for specified, explicit and legitimate purposes 3. Adequate, relevant and limited to what is necessary 4. Accurate and, where necessary, kept up to date 5. Retained in an identifiable form for no longer than necessary 6. Processed in an appropriate manner to maintain security Accountability(Article5(2)) The GDPR Principles (Article 5(1))
  77. 77. Lawfulness of Processing (Article 6 and 7) All data processing must have a lawful basis to be legal under the GDPR.  The majority of personal data processing undertaken by universities and colleges is carried out under a contract between the student and the establishment, not by consent.  When reliant on consent to process data, the student will generally have stronger rights, e.g. to have their data deleted, than if any other lawful basis apply.  Requests for consent must be given in an intelligible and easily accessible form using clear and plain language, together with the purpose for data processing.  Consent must be a freely given, specific, informed and unambiguous. It must involve some form of positive opt-in, and cannot be inferred from silence, pre-ticked boxes or inactivity. 04 January 2018 Tribal Group plc 78
  78. 78. Identifying Data Subjects (Article 12(2),12(6); Recital 57, 64)  The GDPR explicitly enables controllers to require data subjects to provide proof of identity before giving effect to their rights.  If there are reasonable doubts regarding the identity of the data subject, the controller may request the provision of additional information to confirm the identity of the data subject, but is not required to do so. 04 January 2018 Tribal Group plc 79
  79. 79. Time Limits (Article 12(3), 12(4); Recital 59)  You will have less time to comply with a subject access request under the GDPR.  Information must be provided without delay and at the latest within one month of receipt.  If you fail to meet this deadline, the data subject may complain to the ICO and may seek a judicial remedy.  If the controller receives large numbers of requests, or especially complex requests, the time limit may be extended by a maximum of two further months.  If this is the case, however, you must inform the individual within one month of the receipt of the request and explain why the extension is necessary. 04 January 2018 Tribal Group plc 80
  80. 80. Fees for Access Requests (Article 12(5), 15(3), 15(4); Recital 59).  The rights of access, rectification, erasure and the right to object, must be provided free of charge.  The controller may charge a reasonable fee for "repetitive requests", "manifestly unfounded or excessive requests" or "further copies".  This may have a significant effect on organisations who receive large numbers of requests and may result in an increase in administrative costs.  At present there is insufficient guidance on what is meant by “manifestly unfounded or excessive”, so approach this with some caution. 04 January 2018 Tribal Group plc 81
  81. 81. 2. Students Rights Tribal Group plc 82
  82. 82. 1. Right to basic information 2. Right of access 3. Right to rectification 4. Right to erasure (new) 5. Right to restrict processing 6. Right to data portability (new) 7. Right to object 8. Rights related to automated decision making and profiling 9. Right to breach notification 10. Right to lodge a complaint 11. Right to compensation 04 January 2018 Tribal Group plc 83 Students Rights
  83. 83.  Under the GDPR data subjects (the “students”) have the right to confirmation as to whether their personal data is being processed, and the to receive a minimum set of information regarding the purposes for processing.  This includes the identity of the controller, the reasons for processing their personal data and other relevant information necessary to ensure the fair and transparent processing. (This is usually documented in a Privacy Notice). Tribal Group plc 84 1 Right to basic information (Article 13-14; Recital 58, 60)
  84. 84. Content of a Privacy Notice  Identity and contact details of the controller and the data protection officer (DPO)  Purpose of the data processing  Lawful basis for the processing  Legitimate interests of the controller/third party  Categories of personal data processed  The recipient or categories of recipients of the personal data  Details of transfers to third country and safeguards  Retention period or criteria used to determine the retention period  The right to withdraw consent at any time, where relevant  The right to lodge a complaint to the ICO  Whether the provision of personal data is part of a statutory or contractual requirement or obligation  The possible consequences of failing to provide the personal data  The existence of automated decision making, including profiling and information about how decisions are made, the significance and the consequences. 04 January 2018 Tribal Group plc 85 Information must be provided in a concise, transparent, intelligible and easily accessible form, using clear and plain language. The information given to the data subject should not consist of privacy policies that are excessively lengthy or difficult to understand.
  85. 85. 2 Data Subjects are also entitled to access the following information:  the reasons why their data is being processed;  the description of the personal data concerning them;  Details of who has received or will receive their personal data; and  details of the origin of their data if it was not collected from them. Tribal Group plc 86 Right of Access (Article 15; Recital 63)
  86. 86. 2  If a student wishes to exercise their subject access right and receive a copy of their personal data, a subject access request (SAR)must be made in writing.  This request does not have to include the words “Subject Access” or refer to the GDPR for it to constitute a SAR.  Subject Access Requests may be made electronically. If they are, the information should also be provided in a commonly-used electronic format, unless otherwise requested. Tribal Group plc 87 Right of Access (Article 15; Recital 63)
  87. 87. 3  Data Subjects are entitled to have data rectified if it is inaccurate or incomplete.  If the data in question has been disclosed to third parties, you must inform the third parties of the rectification, and the Data Subject about the third parties involved.  The controller must respond within one month. This can be extended by two months where the request for rectification is complex.  If you decide to take no action in response to a request for rectification, then you must explain why, informing the Data Subject of their right to complain to the supervisory authority and to a judicial remedy. Tribal Group plc 88 Right to Rectification (Article 5(1)(d), 16; Recital 39, 59, 65, 73)
  88. 88. 4  Otherwise known as “the right to be forgotten”, this right entitles the data subject to require an organisation that holds their personal data to delete those data, cease further distribution of the data, and have third parties halt processing of the data where the retention is not GDPR compliant.  The right, however, is not an absolute right. In most cases, provided that an organisation has a lawful basis for processing personal data, it will not be significantly affected by the right to be forgotten. Tribal Group plc 89 Right to Erasure (Article 17; Recital 65-66, 68)
  89. 89. 5  Under the DPA, individuals have a right to ‘block’ or suppress processing of personal data. The restriction of processing under the GDPR is similar.  When processing is restricted, you are permitted to store the personal data, but not process it further. You can retain just enough information about the individual to ensure that the restriction is respected in future.  If you have disclosed the personal data in question to third parties, you must inform them about the restriction on the processing of the personal data, unless it is impossible or involves a disproportionate effort to do so. Tribal Group plc 90 Right to Restrict Processing (Article 18, 19; Recital 67)
  90. 90. 6  The right to data portability allows individuals to obtain and reuse a digital copy of their personal data in a safe and secure manner.  Data covered by a portability request includes: ‘personal data’ that the data subject has provided and ‘observed data’ (i.e. anything observed or measured, such as Marks/Grades or Attendance records)  Data excluded includes: ‘derived data’ (e.g. data calculated using other values, for example ranking data) and ‘Inferred data’ (e.g. data created using predictive analytics, such as a student risk/intervention record). Tribal Group plc 91 Right to Data Portability (Article 20; Recital 68, 73; WP29)
  91. 91. 7  Data subjects have the right to object to the processing of their personal data, where the basis for that processing is either public interest; or legitimate interests of the controller.  The burden of proof is now with the controller who must cease such processing unless it can demonstrate compelling legitimate grounds for the processing which override the interests, rights and freedoms of the data subject; or requires the data in order to establish, exercise or defend legal rights. This is unlikely to impact universities or colleges as they rely upon a different legal basis for processing. Tribal Group plc 92 Right to Object to Processing (Article 21; Recital 50, 59, 69-70, 73)
  92. 92. 8  Data subjects have the right not to be subject to a decision based solely on automated processing of their personal data which significantly impacts them (including profiling) without human intervention.  Processing is permitted where it is necessary for entering into or performing a contract with the data subject provided that appropriate safeguards are in place; it is authorised by law; or explicit consent has been obtained. Tribal Group plc 93 Rights related to automated decision making (Article 22; Recital 71, 75)
  93. 93. 9  Breach notifications to the ICO are mandatory where they are likely to “result in a risk for the rights and freedoms of individuals”.  Notification must occur within 72 hours of the breach. Data processors will also be required to notify their customers, the controllers, “without undue delay” of any data breach.  Where a breach is likely to result in a “high risk” to the rights and freedoms of individuals, those concerned must be notified directly “without undue delay,” and be provide with specific information about the steps they should take to protect themselves. Tribal Group plc 94 Right to Breach Notification (Article 34, A29 WP)
  94. 94. 1 0  Any data subject has the right to lodge a complaint with a supervisory authority (in the UK this is the ICO) if they consider that the processing of personal data relating to him or her infringes the GDPR.  Upon investigation, the supervisory authority shall inform the complainant on the progress and the outcome of the complaint.  The data subject has the right to an effective judicial remedy where the supervisory authority does not handle a complaint or does not inform the data subject within three months on the progress or outcome of the complaint. Tribal Group plc 95 Right to Lodge a Complaint (Article 77-79; Recital 141, 143, 145)
  95. 95. 1 1  Any data subject has the right to compensation for material, or non- material damage resulting from a GDPR infringement.  Compensation can be sought from the controller and processor. Tribal Group plc 96 Right to Compensation (Article 82)
  96. 96. Key Takeaways…..  FEES: In most cases, the GDPR does not permit fees to be charge. There is a risk that individuals will attempt to exercise their rights merely because they can, or as a cheap but effective means of protest. This may result in an increase in administrative costs on your organisation. There is no limit on the cost of a SAR. Recent Court of Appeal cap at £120k.  MANDATORY INFORMATION: The GDPR expands the mandatory categories of information which must be supplied in connection with a subject access request. Such requests will place an even greater burden on your DPO’s than currently experienced.  TIME LIMITS: The introduction of specified time limits under the GDPR results in more onerous compliance obligations for controllers.  SUBJECT ACCESS REQUESTS: SAR’s do not have to include the words “Subject Access” or refer to the GDPR to constitute a valid SAR. Just because a SAR ends up sitting in the wrong in- tray, it does not make it any less valid. It’s therefore essential to ensure all staff can recognise a SAR, and know exactly who to pass them on to. 04 January 2018 Tribal Group plc 97
  97. 97. A free pocket book, based on a summary of this presentation will be available in Jan 2018. To obtain your copy of this pocket book and today’s presentation, just register your interest on our stand or email me at: 98Tribal Group plc Paul.duller@tribalgroup.com
  98. 98. Contact: EMAIL PHON E WWW.TRIBALGROUP.COM @TRIBALGROUP Paul.duller@tribalgroup.com +44 771 3189384 I hope you found this useful! Tribal Group plc 99
  99. 99. Required contract provisions for data protection Anjeli Bajaj, Director of information and data compliance, University ofWarwick 04/01/2018 100
  100. 100. Anjeli Bajaj - Information and Data Director,University of Warwick Data ProtectionOfficer Overview Required Contract Provisions: GDPR
  101. 101. Required Contract Provisions: Data Protection Anjeli Bajaj - Information and Data Director, University of Warwick. Data Protection Officer 102 Focus – procuring services of a data processor CommercialTerms run parallel Data Compliance Schedule - Data Protection terms - PIA ( SIA) Article 25 - Security Measures - 2% of GTO Article 83
  102. 102. Required Contract Provisions: Data Protection Supplier of Services as Data Processor » The GDPR enhances the responsibilities and liabilities of Data Processors it is still important to be clear as to the parties respective roles breach reporting . » Relevant legislative provision › See S1(1) DPA, and Article 4(7) GDPR for the definitions of Data Controller and Data Processor. Anjeli Bajaj - Information and Data Director, University of Warwick. Data Protection Officer 103
  103. 103. Required Contract Provisions: Data Protection The Contract between the DP and DC »Should set out the subject matter, duration, nature, and purpose of the processing, the type of personal data that is processed, the categories of data subjects and the duties and rights of the DC. »Relevant legislative provision - Article 28 (3) Anjeli Bajaj - Information and Data Director, University of Warwick. Data Protection Officer 104
  104. 104. Supplier’s ObligationsTo Act on Instructions » The DP must only act upon receipt of the Data Controller's documented instructions (evidence – expecting demonstration of compliance ). » So as to limit the University’s exposure for non-compliant processing of personal data it is important for the University control the way in which the Supplier processes personal data. » It is important therefore that in any accompanying commercial agreement the scope of the Service(s) to be provided by the Supplier is very clearly specified and that very clear instructions are given to the Supplier so that they can understand what their instructions are. » Relevant legislative provision › Article 28 GDPR - Paragraphs 11 and 12 of Schedule 1 part II DPA. Anjeli Bajaj - Information and Data Director, University of Warwick. Data Protection Officer 105 Required Contract Provisions: Data Protection
  105. 105. Third Parties - Engaging Another Processor » The use by the Supplier of third parties needs to be strictly regulated and expressly approved by the University. » Only if, the DP has the DC's authorisation, » the nomination is in a written contract or other legal act, » has the same duties arranged with the DC, » specifies the data protection obligations & the initial DP remains liable » Relevant legislative provision › Article 28 (4) Anjeli Bajaj - Information and Data Director, University of Warwick. Data Protection Officer 106 Required Contract Provisions: Data Protection
  106. 106. Confidentiality » Stipulate:Guarantee Confidentiality » The DP shall ensure that all its staff processing the personal data are committed to confidentiality duties or other appropriate statutory obligation of confidentiality. » Relevant legislative provision › Article 28 (3b) . Anjeli Bajaj - Information and Data Director, University of Warwick. Data Protection Officer 107 Required Contract Provisions: Data Protection
  107. 107. Duty of Assistance to the DC DP must assist to respond the data subject's requests, security processing, the duties in case of a data breach, data protection impact assessment and prior consultation. Anjeli Bajaj - Information and Data Director, University of Warwick. Data Protection Officer 108 Required Contract Provisions: Data Protection
  108. 108. Security Measures » It is a legal requirement for the University to ensure that the Supplier has in place appropriate technical and organisational measures to ensure a level of security appropriate to the risk. » A security measures appendix to your Data Compliance Schedule will stipulate the Security measures the Supplier will be required to put in place as a minimum. » Not an exhaustive list . Anjeli Bajaj - Information and Data Director, University of Warwick. Data Protection Officer 109 Required Contract Provisions: Data Protection
  109. 109. Security Measures – continued » Contractual provision to ensure that it is the Supplier’s responsibility to ensure that the measures it puts in place are sufficient to comply the Data Protection Legislation. » Relevant legislative provision › Article 32 GDPR & article 28 (3c) . Anjeli Bajaj - Information and Data Director, University of Warwick. Data Protection Officer 110 Required Contract Provisions: Data Protection
  110. 110. Data Breach » The University is required to notify the Information Commissioner of any personal data breach within 72 hours of becoming aware of it, unless that breach is unlikely to result in a risk to the rights and freedoms of natural persons. » This is an assessment which the Information and Data Compliance team will need to make. Given the time frames involved it is imperative that Data Compliance Schedule includes provisions for data breaches . » Relevant legislative provision › Article 33 GDPR. Anjeli Bajaj - Information and Data Director, University of Warwick. Data Protection Officer 111 Required Contract Provisions: Data Protection
  111. 111. Requests from Data Subjects » The legislation sets out clearly the steps which the University must take if a data subject requests a copy of his/her personal data. In order to ensure compliance with the legislation it is important that such requests are passed as quickly as possible to the Information and Data Compliance team. » Relevant legislative provision › Articles 13-20 GDPR. Anjeli Bajaj - Information and Data Director, University of Warwick. Data Protection Officer 112 Required Contract Provisions: Data Protection
  112. 112. Audit Demonstrate Compliance The DP should make available to the DC all the necessary information to demonstrate compliance.Allow carrying out audits, inspections, by the DC or auditor that the DC has mandated, and contribute to these checks. Relevant legislative provision › Article 28 (3h)GDPR. Anjeli Bajaj - Information and Data Director, University of Warwick. Data Protection Officer 113 Required Contract Provisions: Data Protection
  113. 113. Register ofTreatments Demonstrate Compliance Unless exempted in line with Art. 30 (5) GDPR, the DP should maintain a register that lists all clients and describes the treatments that its perform on their account.The content is set out in Art. 30 (2) GDPR. Relevant legislative provision › Article 28 (3h)GDPR – Recital 82 Anjeli Bajaj - Information and Data Director, University of Warwick. Data Protection Officer 114 Required Contract Provisions: Data Protection
  114. 114. Warning and Advice The DP must inform the DC without undue delay if, under its opinion, a DC's instruction infringes the GDPR or other Union or Member State data protection law. Relevant legislative provision Article 28 (3h) Anjeli Bajaj - Information and Data Director, University of Warwick. Data Protection Officer 115 Required Contract Provisions: Data Protection
  115. 115. DataTransfers » The rules governing the transfer of personal data outside the EEA are strict and complex. Generally such transfers should be avoided if at all possible although it is recognised that occasionally they may need to take place. Where there is to be any transfer of data outside of the EEA an assessment needs to be made as to the legal basis for that transfer, the adequacy of the data protection legislation in that country and what other safeguards need to be put in place.Accordingly, clause 5’s initial starting point is that transfers outside the EEA are not permitted but where express approval for these is given those transfers have to be restricted and carefully monitored. » Relevant legislative provision › Articles 13-20 GDPR /Model Contracts Anjeli Bajaj - Information and Data Director, University of Warwick. Data Protection Officer 116 Required Contract Provisions: Data Protection
  116. 116. DataTreatment on termination » Return of data. » Secure Deletion » Relevant legislative provision › Article 28 GDPR. Anjeli Bajaj - Information and Data Director, University of Warwick. Data Protection Officer 117 Required Contract Provisions: Data Protection
  117. 117. Indemnity » The Data Compliance Schedule needs to include comprehensive indemnity from the Supplier and a requirement for the Supplier to put in place adequate insurance to cover it if the indemnity is called upon. » It is recognised that often commercial agreements include limitations on liability and more restrictive indemnities. In the circumstances, breach of the Data Compliance Schedule should be expressly carved out of any limitation on liability and this should be borne in mind when discussing the indemnities in any commercial agreement. Anjeli Bajaj - Information and Data Director, University of Warwick. Data Protection Officer 118 Required Contract Provisions: Data Protection
  118. 118. Indemnity – continued » Whilst it is recognised that on occasion suppliers may seek to resist the indemnity in the Data Compliance Schedule however no variation to this should be agreed without the Information and Data Compliance team’s prior agreement. » Relevant legislative provision › Articles 83 GDPR. Anjeli Bajaj - Information and Data Director, University of Warwick. Data Protection Officer 119 Required Contract Provisions: Data Protection
  119. 119. Training » Training is a key component of security and privacy by design and default. » Relevant legislative provision › Article 5, › Article 28, › Article 32, › Article 35. Anjeli Bajaj - Information and Data Director, University of Warwick. Data Protection Officer 120 Required Contract Provisions: Data Protection
  120. 120. Anjeli Bajaj - Information and Data Director, University of Warwick. Data Protection Officer 121 Type of contract/agreement Relationship Requirement T e m p l a t e Data sharing agreement Controller to controller Data sharing agreement Controller to processor Draft data sharing agreement and attach data compliance schedule Institutional agreement where IDC are asked to insert a DP schedule Controller to controller Data sharing agreement Controller to processor Insert data compliance schedule and where required a data sharing agreement Supplier legal contract Check if any DP provisions and review. Separate data sharing agreement and data compliance schedule required. Clause in supplier legal contract to be inserted referring to these documents. Controller to processor Negotiating point begins with our data compliance schedule Accreditation bodies Controller to controller Data Sharing Agreement Auditors speaking to students Informed consent required Controller to processor External auditing data provision agreement Auditors Controller to controller Data Sharing Controller to processor External auditing data provision agreement Required Contract Provisions: Data Protection
  121. 121. Break 04/01/2018 122
  122. 122. Geek-DPR: how you still need ICT Tim Rodgers, Compliance and information governance manager, Imperial College London 04/01/2018 123
  123. 123. GDPR implications for research Andrew Charlesworth, Reader in IT and the law, University of Bristol 04/01/2018 124
  124. 124. The GDPR and Research Andrew Charlesworth Centre for IT & Law University of Bristol Law School
  125. 125. I must recognise … that the [Data Protection] Act [1998] is of notorious obscurity…” Lindsay J. in Douglas v. Hello! Ltd (No.7) (2004) “Hold our beer…” The GDPR & UK Data Protection Bill
  126. 126. Background • Cross-disciplinary post in Law & Computer Science (2001-2016) • Author, Jisc DP Code of Practice for FE and HE (2001 & 2007) • Empirical Researcher in a Social Sciences Faculty (2001–) • Member/Chair, Law School Research Ethics Committee (2006-) • Author, Jisc Data Protection and Research Data (2014-15) • Member/Chair, University Research Data Access Committee (2015- )
  127. 127. The GDPR: Issues I • Anonymity & Pseudonymisation – R.26, 28 & 29 + Art.4(5) • Further processing – R.50 + Art.5(1)(b) (+ Art.89(1) + R.156 + Art.9) • Storage – Art.5(1)(e) (+ Art.89) • Lawfulness of processing - Art.6(1) • Consent - Art.6(1)(a) BUT Art.9(2)(j) • Public interest - Art 6(1)(e) + R.45 • Legitimate interests Art.6(1)(f) + R.47 (are Universities ‘public authorities’?) • Consent – R.33 + Art.7 • Special categories of personal data – Art.9 inc. Art.9(2)(j) (+Art.89) • Also Art. 9(2)(g) - further alternatives in the substantial public interest
  128. 128. The GDPR: Issues II • DSR: Information provided to data subject • Where obtained from data subject - Art.13 • Where not obtained from data subject - Art.14(5)(b) (+ Art.89) • DSR: Right to erasure – Art.17(3)(d) (+ Art 89) • DSR: Right to object – Art.21(6) (+ Art.89) • Freedom of expression and information – Art.85 • Processing for historical, statistical and scientific research purposes – Art.89 + R.156.
  129. 129. The GDPR: Issues III • Art.89(1) + R156 - requires safeguards for the processing of personal data for research. If provided these derogations/special provisions are enabled: • Art.5(1)(b) and (e) - further processing and storage • Art.9(2)(j) - processing of special categories of data • Art.14(5)(b) - information requirements- • Art.17(3)(d) - right to erasure • Art.21(6) - right to object • Technical and organisational approaches must ensure the processing of personal data is limited to the minimum needed • Anonymous data should be used instead of personal data where possible
  130. 130. The GDPR: Issues IV • Art.89(2) - Union or Member States can legislate further derogations from the following data subject rights, inc: • Art.15 - right to subject access • Art. 16 - right to rectification • Art. 17a - right to restriction of processing • Art. 19 - right to object • + others in R.156 • IF the conditions of A.89(1) are met; AND applying the right would seriously compromise the purpose; AND the derogations are necessary for the purpose to be achieved.
  131. 131. Data Protection Bill • Currently Sch.2 Pt.6 s.25 & 26 – derogations under Art.86(2) GDPR • Art. 15(1) to (3) (confirmation of processing, access to data and safeguards for third country transfers); • Art. 16 (right to rectification); • Art. 18(1) (restriction of processing); • Art. 21(1) (objections to processing). • IF data is processed in accordance with Art. 89(1) AND for Arts. 15(1)-(3), the results of the research or any resulting statistics are not made available in a form which identifies a data subject
  132. 132. Pragmatics I • The EU is keenly aware of the potential impact of the GDPR on research, both public & private. • The existing framework for UK research compliance will remain broadly the same. • BUT there is scope for divergence in exemptions and derogations between EU Member States, with implications for cross-border research collaborations. • As a social sciences researcher and REC member, my key issues are: • Education of researchers; • Accountability and research governance; • Addressing consent as both a legal and ethical requirement, and the alternatives to consent.
  133. 133. Pragmatics II • Different academic disciplines face varying challenges to existing practices - avoid ‘one-size-fits-all’ solutions and ‘quick fixes’. • RECs already address DP (to varying degrees) – they can identify discipline- specific risks, good practice and problems with suggested ‘solutions’ • As RECs have varying expertise in DP, it is important that they are not simply used as ‘gatekeepers’, but rather trained/developed as ‘facilitators’. • Research training, research data management plans, workflow • ‘privacy by design’ and ‘privacy impact assessment’ elements • Accountability • We do forms and training, but do we really do accountability?
  134. 134. Q & A session 04/01/2018 135
  135. 135. Jisc GDPR Conference04/01/2018 136

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