Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

ILP System Engineering Approach to Food Safety

579 views

Published on

  • Login to see the comments

ILP System Engineering Approach to Food Safety

  1. 1. A  System  Engineering  Approach   to  Food  Safety   John  Helferich   PhD  Candidate  IDSS   Prof  John  Carroll,  Advisor   ILP  R&D  Conference  –  Food  Track   11/18/15   Safe Food Lab
  2. 2. Outline   •  Context   –  US  Food  System:  Pressures   –  Food  Safety:  MoOvaOon  to  study   •  System  Engineering:    Can  it  create  new  insights  on  management   of  food  safety?   •  Analysis  of  Food  Safety  Management  System  (FSMS)   –  System  TheoreOc  Accident  Modeling  Process  (STAMP)*   –  Object  Process  Modeling  (OPM)   –  Design  Structure  Matrix  (DSM)   *  My  research  focus   ©  John  Helferich  2015   2  
  3. 3. US  Food  System  Historical  PerspecOve   Local   Regional      to      Na.onal    to  Global   Pre  Civil  War   Today  1970s  ©  John  Helferich  2015   3  
  4. 4. Pressures  on  the  Food  System  Today   Factory,  Global  Farm,  Global   ArOsanal,  Local  Farm,  Local   New  Food  System   TradiOonal  Food  System   ©  John  Helferich  2015   4   Local  to  Global   Farm  to  Factory   Industrial  to  ArOsanal  
  5. 5. Food  System  Issues   •  Food  Safety  -­‐    illness  and  injury  caused  by  micro-­‐organisms,   allergens,  or  foreign  material   •  Food  Security  -­‐    lack  of  nutriOous  food  due  to  affordability  and   availability   •  Food  Defense  –  protecOon  against  intenOonal  contaminaOon   •  Food  Sustainability  –  methods  of  producOon  considering   economics,  environment  and  social  perspecOves   •  Food  JusOce  -­‐    ?????   •  Others  –  Obesity,  GMOs,  …   ©  John  Helferich  2015   5  
  6. 6. Societal  Impacts  of  Food  Safety   •  On  people1   –  3000  deaths  per  year:  ~  20  plane  crashes  per  year   –  300,000  hospitalizaOons   –  48  Million  illnesses:    One  out  of  6  people  in  the  US  annually   •  On  the  Economy2   –  Direct  -­‐  $15  billion   –  Indirect  -­‐  $152  billion   –  Loss  of  confidence  in  food  system   •  On  Firms   –  ReputaOonal  damage:  Chipotle  -­‐>  27%  point  drop  in  consumer  percepOon3   –  Costs:    Kellogg’s  $70mm  charge  from  PCA  Salmonella  in  peanut  buker   –  Jail  Time:    Stewart  Parnell,  PCA,  sentenced  to  28  years     1  CDC,  2011      2  Pew  FoundaOon,  2011        3  YouGov  BrandIndex  Survey,  11/13/15   ©  John  Helferich  2015   6  
  7. 7. System  Engineering   •  Systems  Engineering  is  an  engineering   discipline  whose  responsibility  is  creaOng  and   execuOng  an  interdisciplinary  process  to   ensure  that  the  customer  and  stakeholder's   needs  are  saOsfied  in  a  high  quality,   trustworthy,  cost  efficient  and  schedule   compliant  manner  throughout  a  system's   enOre  life  cycle.     INCOSE  Handbook   ©  John  Helferich  2015   7  
  8. 8. Food  System  High  Level  Requirements   •  Food  shall  be:   –  Safe,   –  Affordable,     –  Available,     –  NutriOous,     –  Palatable,   –  And,  increasingly,  Produced  Sustainably     •  Safe  -­‐  Food  shall  not  contain  pathogens  at  point   of  consump.on   ©  John  Helferich  2015   8  
  9. 9. How  the  food  system  controls  pathogens   Control  the  producOon  environment     Control  bacteria  or  bacterial  growth  by  killing  or  chilling   ©  John  Helferich  2015   9  
  10. 10. US  Food  Safety  Management  System   ©  John  Helferich  2015   10   Good   Agricultural   PracOces   (GAP)   Good   Manufacturing   PracOces   (cGMP)   Good   DistribuOon   and  Retail   PracOces   Good  Food   Service   PracOces   (ServSafe)       Consumer   PracOces   Hazard  Analysis  and  CriOcal  Control   Points   HACCP      à      HARPC   “Prerequisite  Programs”   Farm   Factory   DistribuOon   ConsumpOon   System   Boundary   Control  the  producOon  environment   Control  bacteria  or  bacterial  growth  by  killing  or  chilling  
  11. 11. System  Engineering  Process   ©  John  Helferich  2015   11   Today’s   Focus  
  12. 12. System  Engineering  Models  and  Methods  applied  to   Food  Safety  Management  System   •  FSMS:  A  New  Accident  Model  Approach   –  System  Theore.c  Accident  Modeling  Process  (STAMP)   •  FSMS:  System  Architecture     – Object  Process  Modeling  (OPM)   •  FSMS:  RegulaOon  Analysis   – Design  Structure  Matrix  (DSM)   ©  John  Helferich  2015   12  
  13. 13. System  Approach  to  Safety   Safety  as  a  Control  Problem   ©  John  Helferich  2015   13   Prof  Nancy  Leveson   Course  16   NAE     Safety  as  a  control  problem,  not  a   reliability  problem     IniOal  Problem   •  How  to  ensure  souware  is  safe     Now  expanded  to  many  other  domains   •  AviaOon   •  Space   •  Auto   •  Nuclear   •  Cybersecurity   •  Food  
  14. 14. Historical  Approaches  to  Accident   CausaOon   ©  John  Helferich  2015   14   Domino  Model   Heinrich  1920’s   Swiss  Cheese  Model   Reason  1990  
  15. 15. Architectures  of  Safety  Systems   Defense  in  Depth   High  Component  Reliability   ©  John  Helferich  2015   15  
  16. 16. But  what  about  component  interacOons?   (i.e.  complex  or  emergent  behavior)   Both  components  are  highly  reliable,  but  in  an  unsafe  state   ©  John  Helferich  2015   16  
  17. 17. Senior Manager Operators Prevention of Ingress of Pathogens Food Safety Leader Operations Manager Regulator (Public and Private) Food Firm Owner Mental Model Decision Rules Food Hazard Control Structure Feedback Resource Requests Pathogen Control Results Procedures Resources Policies Standards Resources Results Recommendations Senior Manager Operators Prevention of Ingress of Pathogens Food Safety Leader Operations Manager Regulator (Public and Private) Food Firm Owner Mental Model Decision Rules Food Hazard Control Structure Feedback Resource Requests Pathogen Control Results Procedures Resources Policies Standards Resources Results Recommendations How  can  we  strengthen  system  control  to  prevent  driu  into  unsafe  state?   STAMP   ©  John  Helferich  2015   17  
  18. 18. STAMP:  How  the  high  level  safety  requirement  is  controlled   ©  John  Helferich  2015   18   Senior Manager Operators Prevention of Ingress of Pathogens Food Safety Leader Operations Manager Mental Model Decision Rules Senior Manager Control Loop External Input
  19. 19. Senior Manager Operators Prevention of Ingress of Pathogens Food Safety Leader Operations Manager Regulator (Public and Private) Food Firm Owner Mental Model Decision Rules Food Hazard Control Structure Feedback Resource Requests Pathogen Control Results Procedures Resources Policies Standards Resources Results Recommendations ©  John  Helferich  2015   19   My  Research  
  20. 20. Senior Manager Operators Prevention of Ingress of Pathogens Food Safety Leader Operations Manager Mental Model Decision Rules Senior Manager Control Loop External Input ©  John  Helferich  2015   20   My  Research  
  21. 21. My  Research  QuesOons   1.  How  do  food  safety  decisions  get  made  under  the  real  condiOons   of  low  frequency-­‐high  consequences  in  a  listeria  prone   environment?    (Study  1)   1.  Food  Safety  Subject  Maker  Expert  (FS  SME)  PerspecOve   2.  Decision  Maker  (DM)  PerspecOve   2.  Based  on  Study  1,  do  we  see  evidence  of  “behavioral”  decision   making?  What  are  the  decision  making  styles  of  DM?   3.  Can  we  “nudge”  the  decision-­‐making  process  to  improve   incidence  of  good  food  safety  decision  making  by  inducing   regulatory  fit  between  SME  proposal  style  and  the  decision   making  style  of  the  DM?  (Study  2)  
  22. 22. Research  Plan   •  Study  1   –  Interviews  of  pairs  of  Decision  Makers/Food  Safety   SME   –  How  are  Food  Safety  Decisions  made?   –  Looking  for  several  more  firms  for  interviews   •  Study  2   –  Can  we  “nudge”  managers  to  make  beker  decisions?   –  Priming  PrevenOon  vs  PromoOon  OrientaOon   ©  John  Helferich  2015   22  
  23. 23. Subjects (FS DM) Promotion Primed Prevention Primed Random Assignment Promotion Fit Proposal Prevention Fit Proposal Promotion Fit Proposal Prevention Fit Proposal A Likelihood of Approval B Likelihood of Approval C Likelihood of Approval D Likelihood of Approval Random Assignment Random Assignment Check for Regulatory Fit Check for Regulatory Fit Check for Regulatory Fit Check for Regulatory Fit Predictions 1. Likelihood: A,D > B,C 2. Likelihood: D>A 3. Regulatory Fit: A,D > B,C Study 2: “Nudging” through inducing regulatory fit Looking  for  Decision  Makers  to  par.cipate,  short  survey  
  24. 24. System  Engineering  Models  and  Methods  applied  to   Food  Safety  Management  System   •  FSMS:  A  New  Accident  Model  Approach   –  System  TheoreOc  Accident  Modeling  Process  (STAMP)   •  FSMS:  System  Architecture     – Object  Process  Modeling  (OPM)   •  FSMS:  RegulaOon  Analysis   – Design  Structure  Matrix  (DSM)   ©  John  Helferich  2015   24  
  25. 25. System  Architecture   ©  John  Helferich  2015   25   Dr  Bruce  Cameron   Director,  System  Architecture  Lab   Lecturer  in  Engineering  Systems     Prof  Edward  Crawley   Course  16,  MIT   President,  Skolkovo  InsOtute  of   Science  and  Technology,  Moscow     Defining  and  Analyzing  System   Architecture  leading  to  beker   designs  
  26. 26. System  Architecture   The  embodiment  of  concept,  and  the  allocaOon  of  funcOon  to  elements  of  form,   and  defini.on  of  rela.onships  among  the  elements  and  with  the  surrounding   context.       ©  John  Helferich  2015   26  
  27. 27. Architecture  of  Safety  Systems   Air  Traffic  Control  ©  John  Helferich  2015   27  
  28. 28. Modeling  System  Architectures   Object  Process  Modeling  Language*   Food   SterilizaOon   (Canning)   Architectures  of  food  preservaOon   Food   Freezing   Object   Process   28  *  Prof  Dov  Dori,  Technion  -­‐  Israel  InsOtute  of  Technology  
  29. 29. To prevent presence of pathogens in food by controlling pathogen ingress using validated control processes Preventing Ingress Pathogen Out In Maintaining Certifying Training Building Envelope Closed Open Raw Materials Tested Not tested Personnel Trained Not Trained Controlling Presence Sanitizing Plant Environment Clean Not Clean Equipment Clean Not Clean Pathogen Out In Food (Microbiology) Stable Not Stable Stabilization Heating Chilling Freezing Irradiation Level  1   Level  2   Level  3   OPD  of  Food  Safety  Control  System   ©  John  Helferich  2015   29  
  30. 30. System  Engineering  Models  and  Methods  applied  to   Food  Safety  Management  System   •  FSMS:  A  New  Accident  Model  Approach   –  System  TheoreOc  Accident  Modeling  Process  (STAMP)   •  FSMS:  System  Architecture     – Object  Process  Modeling  (OPM)   •  FSMS:  Regula.on  Analysis   – Design  Structure  Matrix  (DSM)   ©  John  Helferich  2015   30  
  31. 31. Design  Structure  Matrix   ©  John  Helferich  2015   31   Prof  Steven  Eppinger,  Sloan     Wide  applicaOons  to  many  systems     •  Products   •  OrganizaOons   •  Projects     •  RegulaOons  
  32. 32. Design  Structure  Matrix   •  Requirements   •  Food  shall  be  …   1.  Safe   2.  Affordable   3.  Available   4.  NutriOous   5.  Palatable   6.  Sustainable   1   2   3   4   5   6   1   -­‐   X   X   X   2   -­‐   X   X   3   X   X   -­‐   4   -­‐   X   5   X   X   -­‐   6   X   X   -­‐   NxN  Matrix   Connected  Requirements   DSM   ©  John  Helferich  2015   32  
  33. 33. FSMA  GMP  Rules:  21  CFR  117   ©  John  Helferich  2015   33   1   117.10  Personnel.   2   The management of the establishment must take reasonable measures and precautions to ensure the following:   3   (a) Disease control. Any person who, by medical examination or supervisory observation, is shown to have, or appears to have, an illness, open lesion, including boils, sores, or infected wounds, or any other abnormal source of microbial contamination by which there is a reasonable possibility of food, food-contact surfaces, or food-packaging materials becoming contaminated, must be excluded from any operations which may be expected to result in such contamination until the condition is corrected, unless conditions such as open lesions, boils, and infected wounds are adequately covered (e.g.,by an impermeable cover). Personnel must be instructed to report such health conditions to their supervisors.   4   (b) Cleanliness. All persons working in direct contact with food, food-contact surfaces, and food-packaging materials must conform to hygienic practices while on duty to the extent necessary to protect against allergen cross-contact and against contamination of food. The methods for maintaining cleanliness include:   5   117.20  Plant  and  grounds.   6   (a) Grounds. The grounds about a food plant under the control of the operator must be kept in a condition that will protect against the contamination of food. The methods for adequate maintenance of grounds must include:   7   (b) Plant construction and design. The plant must be suitable in size, construction, and design to facilitate maintenance and sanitary operations for food-production purposes (i.e., manufacturing, processing, packing, and holding). The plant must:   8   117.35  Sanitary  operaOons.   9   (a)  General  maintenance.  Buildings,  fixtures,  and  other  physical  faciliOes  of  the  plant  must  be  maintained  in  a  clean  and  sanitary   condiOon  and  must  be  kept  in  repair  adequate  to  prevent  food  from  becoming  adulterated.  Cleaning  and  saniOzing  of  utensils  and   equipment  must  be  conducted  in  a  manner  that  protects  against  allergen  cross-­‐contact  and  against  contaminaOon  of  food,  food-­‐ contact  surfaces,  or  food-­‐packaging  materials.   10   (b)  Substances  used  in  cleaning  and  saniOzing;  storage  of  toxic  materials.     11   (c)  Pest  control.  Pests  must  not  be  allowed  in  any  area  of  a  food  plant.Guard,  guide,  or  pest-­‐detecOng  dogs  may  be  allowed  in  some   areas  of  a  plant  if  the  presence  of  the  dogs  is  unlikely  to  result  in  contaminaOon  of  food,  food-­‐contact  surfaces,  or  food-­‐packaging   materials.  EffecOve  measures  must  be  taken  to  exclude  pests  from  the  manufacturing,  processing,  packing,  and  holding  areas  and  to   protect  against  the  contaminaOon  of  food  on  the  premises  by  pests.  The  use  of  pesOcides  to  control  pests  in  the  plant  is  permiked   only  under  precauOons  and  restricOons  that  will  protect  against  the  contaminaOon  of  food,  food-­‐contact  surfaces,  and  food-­‐ packaging  materials.   High  Level  Requirements  
  34. 34. FSMA  Requirements  Ideal  DSM   Planning   Opera.ng   Monitoring   Documen.ng   Re-­‐planning        1                2   3              4   5              6   7                8   9          10   Planning   •  1   •  2   OperaOng   •  3   •  4   Monitoring   •  5   •  6   DocumenOng   •  7   •  8   Re-­‐planning   •  9   •  10   ©  John  Helferich  2015   34  
  35. 35. Food  Safety  ModernizaOon  Act:  GMP  Requirements  DSM   35       1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   1                                                                                                                                                   2                                                                                                                                                   3                                                                                   1                                                               4                                                                                                                                                   5                                                                                       1                                                           6                                                                                                                                                   7                       1                                           1   1   1   1   1   1                                                           8                                                                                                                                                   9                                                                       1   1   1       1                                                           10                                                                                       1                                                       1   11                       1   1                                                                       1   1           1   1                           12                           1       1   1                                                                               1                           13                           1           1                                                                               1                           14                           1           1   1                                                                                                       15                                                                                                                                                   16                                   1                                                                                                               17                                                                   1                                                                               18                                                                   1                                                                               19               1           1                                       1                                                                               20               1                                                   1       1                                                                       21                       1   1               1                                                                                                       22                                                                                                                                               1   23                                                                                                                                                   24                                   1           1       1                                                                                           25                                               1   1                                                                                               26                                   1               1                                                                                               27                                                                                                                                                   28                                                                                                                                               1   29                                   1                                                                                                               30                                                                                                                                                   31                                                                                                                                                   32                                                                                                                                                   33                                                                                                                                                   34                                                                                                                                                   35                                                                                                                                                   36                           1       1       1                                                                                                      
  36. 36. ParOOoned  DSM   32       3   5   16   24   28   14   25   26   29   21   12   13   11   7   9   17   18   19   20   10   22   36   4   6   30   3       1       5       1       16       1       24       1   1   1       28       1       14                               1   1   1       25           1   1           26           1       1       29               1       21           1   1   1       12           1   1   1   1   13           1   1   1   11       1   1   1       1   1   1   7                   1                       1   1   1   1       1       1       9           1   1   1   1           17                   18       1               19   1   1           1       20       1   1           1       10           1   1       22           1       36   1   1   1                                   4           6           30                                                                                                       Equipment   and  Facility   Design   Sanita.on   Capabili.es   Plant  Design   Maintenance  
  37. 37. Summary   •  System  Engineering  Methods   – STAMP   – Object  Process  Modeling   – Design  Structure  Matrix   •  More  Info?    Interested  in  parOcipaOng  in   research?   – helferic@mit.edu   ©  John  Helferich  2015   37  

×