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Building muscles to improve innovation networks pugh skifstad may 2020 final (1)

In this session we talk about the imperative to use networks and collaboration for innovation. We provide four tools for doing this:
1. Network effectiveness framework (for designing the network for innovation outcomes)
2. Four Discussion Disciplines (for improving the day to day interactions for innovation)
3. Innovation Network levers (for systematically infusing network and conversation practices into the innovation levers)
4. Open Innovation model (for discerning who's participating, and how, as innovation opens up to include outside brains, ideas, and funds).

This presentation features research and practice, and we hope to collaborate with others working in innovation to improve our shared innovation network models. .

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Building muscles to improve innovation networks pugh skifstad may 2020 final (1)

  1. 1. Building muscles to improve innovation networks Katrina Pugh, Columbia University and AlignConsulting Sheryl Skifstad, Procter & Gamble May 19, 2020
  2. 2. Why innovation? Prosperity has always driven by innovation. • With today’s economic woes, to evolve to the new normal, more innovation and creativity are needed than we have seen in our lifetime. • We must get our organizations beyond our current thinking, designing and organizing. • We will share how you can take your current networks and working groups to the next level. 2
  3. 3. Driving to innovate better for 30 years 3 1990s Organizational Learning and Open Source 2000s Networked Knowledge, Open Innovation intro‘d 2010s Social Graph, Cowdsourcing and Incubators Rob Cross, Darden/Babson. Henry Chesbrough, Berkeley Haas Collab thought- leaders: John Whitehurst, Red Hat 2020s Open Structures and Open Innovation expanded Yahoo Knowledge Graph COVID-19 Datasets Peter Senge, MIT Sloan Multi-layer Open Innovation (M13 [2016]) Crowdworking (Catalant [2013]) Incubators (Y Combinator [2005]) Open Source (Linux [1991] Open Innovation (Innocentive [2001] Innova- tion NW Models:
  4. 4. Agenda 1. Introduction 2. Why networks and why now? 3. 4 Discussion Disciplines 4. Planning exercise a. Debrief 5. Open Innovation a. Group Planning exercise 6. Conclusion 4
  5. 5. Hello, from Cincinnati and Boston! 5 Sheryl Skifstad M.S., M.B.A, PMP Ms. Katrina Pugh M.S./M.B.A. Procter & Gamble, OH Program Management Columbia University, NY Collaboration Science
  6. 6. Our Research: Work of the Future 6 Conversation Practices 1. Columbia University pilot of 4 discussion disciplines (4DDs) 2. Quantification of 4DDs with Motorola Solutions Open Innovation 1. P&G study/Practice of open innovation 2. Columbia Networked Work course - Understanding Open innovation players Knowledge Networks 1. Motorola U CoP study 2. Gates study on networks for spreading public health insights 3. PMI sponsored (Columbia-Monash) study on KNs for PM competencies
  7. 7. What is Innovation? A combination of ideas, models, data and applications that solves a new or existing problem in a novel way. ► To move from concept into action requires intention (surface ideas, make connections) ► This is collaboration 7
  8. 8. Innovation thought leaders Vijay Govindarajan, Dartmouth, Tuck's Center for Global Leadership Andy Hargadon, University of California Davis Entrepreneurship Bridging Defining the “what” Social Integration Leveraging the “we” 8
  9. 9. Why networks, and why for innovation? 9
  10. 10. A “knowledge network” is a practical and intentional collection of individuals and/or teams who come together across organizational or disciplinary boundaries to share, transfer or create knowledge products, or leverage their scale. 10
  11. 11. How networks work...when they work! 11 Goal Mechanism Innovation Result ● Achieving alignment in a complex system of actors Shared belonging De-centralizes power Federates decision-making Sustainable structure for iteration, learning fast ● Improvising / evolving quickly in response to evidence and feedback Leverages ties of members Leverages sector diversity Network’s collective learning (Network self-aware) ● Integrating operational know- how into each context Leverages cognitive diversity Members’ / member organizations’ learning
  12. 12. KN Effectiveness Framework 12 Design Dynamics Behavior What are the impacts? What tone and behaviors do we see? What dynamics come into play? What levers do we pull? Impacts More leverage Pugh and Prusak, 'Designing Effective Knowledge Networks' Sloan Mgt Review, 2013
  13. 13. Four Types of KN Impacts/Goals 13 2. Member Support 3. Translation, Local Adaptation 4. Horizontal Coordination 1. Learning/Innovation (E.g., of new practices) Pugh and Prusak, 'Designing Effective Knowledge Networks' Sloan Mgt Review, 2013
  14. 14. . 8 KN Design Dimensions Strategic 1. Leaders’ Shared Theory of Change 2. Objectives/Outcomes/Purpose 3. Expert-Learner balance (psych. safety) 4. Inclusion/Participation Structural 5. Operating Model 6. Convening Structures and Activities 7. Facilitation and Social Norm Development Tactical 8. Measurement, Feedback, and Incentives Pugh and Prusak, 'Designing Effective Knowledge Networks' Sloan Mgt Review, 2013 14
  15. 15. Conversation at the heart of innovation 15
  16. 16. Discussions impact the quality of innovation What can go right? Focus Honesty Diversity of ideas Sense-making Commitment What can go wrong? Distraction Avoidance Misunderstanding Group-think Resentment https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/digital-fray-dont-just-converse-collaborate-katrina-kate-pugh 16
  17. 17. Four Discussion Disciplines 17 Inclusion Translation Integrity Courtesy
  18. 18. Integrity – What are examples of Integrity? Integrity • Ask questions that propel • Use your true voice • Research views Anti-Integrity • Parrot others • Make vague statements • Don’t ask questions, but make statements disguised as questions Four Discussion Disciplines 18 Integrity
  19. 19. Courtesy – What are examples of Courtesy? Courtesy • Respect others, with appreciation, gratitude (“thank you!”) • Respect the forum. Keep the discussion in the forum Anti-Courtesy • Let a nice deed (e.g., shared knowledge) go un-thanked. • Take the conversation “offline,” e.g., into email. Four Discussion Disciplines 19 Courtesy
  20. 20. Inclusion – What are examples of Inclusion? Inclusion • Explain terms, and don’t use acronyms • Call others in (“@Jimmy, your view?”) • Broaden the perspective (“This could also be called X.”) Anti-Inclusion • Be exclusive • Use jargon Four Discussion Disciplines 20 Inclusion
  21. 21. Translation – What are examples of Translation? Translation • Summarize/use insights generated (“We started here and ended there.”) • Help others with summarizations. Anti-Translation • Leave the forum when you “get the answer,” without recap. • Comment without acknowledging what you are responding to. Four Discussion Disciplines 21 Translation
  22. 22. 4 Discussion Disciplines (4DDs) For 405 posts, 4DDs improved closure and innovation empirically Skifstad and Pugh, “Beyond netiquette: Discussion discipline drives innovation” (In Smarter Innovation, Ark Group, 2014). Discussion discipline Description 1. Integrity Use true voice, research views, Ask questions that propel. 2. Courtesy Respect others and forum. 3. Inclusion Broaden the perspective. Explain terms, call others in. 4. Translation Summarize/use insights generated, and help others with summarizations. 22 22 Benefit to Collaboration Primarily tonal; builds community and social capital. Primarily content- related; drives innovation.
  23. 23. Four Discussion Disciplines: 23 Inclusion Translation Integrity Courtesy Which ones do you need to work on?
  24. 24. Conversation in your network: Planning Exercise 24
  25. 25. Pick a network that matters to you... 1. Which of the KN Design Dimensions could strengthen your network 1. Which 4 Discussion Disciplines does your network lack? 1. What awareness/tools can you put in place to improve these disciplines, and catch and avoid the “anti” behaviors? 1. Where might you pilot and how will you measure success? 25
  26. 26. 26
  27. 27. Your Networks as Innovation Levers 27
  28. 28. #1. Bridging: Translating an idea from one context to the next context 4DDs: Translation, Inclusion Digital: idea-generation and sorting using whiteboards, OneNote, (future: Cortex) Pugh, Smarter Innovation, Ark Group, 2014 28
  29. 29. #2. Social integration: Road test (with people who are different) 4DDs: Courtesy, Inclusion Digital: Voting using polls, routing, social media Pugh, Smarter Innovation, Ark Group, 2014 29
  30. 30. #3. Capabilities Assessment: Asking, “Can we do this?” “Who can do this in our ecosystem?” 4DDs: Integrity, Inclusion Digital: Expert finder, NLP, Forms to cull existing capabilities, (future: Cortex) Pugh, Smarter Innovation, Ark Group, 2014 30
  31. 31. #4. Market and industry exploration: Asking, “Is there a market?” 4DDs: Integrity, Inclusion, Translation Digital: Standing Google search, customer data platforms (CDPs) Pugh, Smarter Innovation, Ark Group, 2014 31
  32. 32. #5. Commercialization: Positioning, campaigning 4DDs: Inclusion, Integrity, Translation Ex: Using MS Planner, Trello, Crimson Hexagon to get the campaign going, do social listening Pugh, Smarter Innovation, Ark Group, 2014 32
  33. 33. Open Innovation Open innovation is “the use of purposive inflows and outflows of knowledge to accelerate internal innovation, and expand the markets for external use of innovation, respectively.” One [facet] is the “outside in” aspect, where external ideas and technologies are brought into the firm’s own innovation process... The other, less commonly recognized aspect is the “inside out” part, where un- and under-utilized ideas and technologies in the firm are allowed to go outside to be incorporated into others’ innovation processes. 33Henry Chesbrough Blog, 3/21/2011 https://www.forbes.com/sites/henrychesbrough/2011/03/21/everything-you-need-to-know-about-open-innovation/#4aa53bf775f4
  34. 34. Open Innovation options 34 Intellectual property/invention Does this come from the start-up, themselves, or the partner (convener) or is it crowd-sourced? Human, process, social capital Does this come from the start-up, themselves, or the partner (convener) or is it crowd-sourced? Financial capital Does this come from the start-up, themselves, or the partner (convener) or is it crowd-sourced?“A pair of Founders”
  35. 35. Rationale of the open innovation models 35 Convener “crowd sources” or otherwise sources new IP ● Convener provides access to expert network to generate IP ● Convener could also provide its own IP ● Convener quickly gets IP developed, patented, while also standing up or crowdsourcing human, process, or social capital ● Funding could be from inside or outside IP is from the Start-up ● Convener provides incubator-based training, networking, coaching, community ● Convener provides access to dollar funding ● Convener stands up specific human, process or social capital quickly ● Convener provides access to in-kind and dollar funding Startup brings team Convener convenes “open” resources or acquires staff for the start-up Staffing of the Start-up Team Source of the innovation
  36. 36. Map of some open innovation players 36 Convener “crowd sources” or otherwise sources new IP IP is from the Start-up Startup brings team Convener convenes “open” resources or acquires staff for the start-up Staffing of the Start-up Team Source of the innovation Quirky M13 M13 BCG Digital Ventures GLG, Alphasights OnFrontiers, Guidepoint Y Combinator Founders’ institute Innocentive
  37. 37. 4 Discussion Disciplines Knowledge networks Open Innovation Objective Digital ideation; Foundation of psychologically safe and productive communication Sustainable ideation, vetting Foundation for process Ideas brought in, ideas sent out Leverage outside capabilities, capacity Headline Discussions start with people. 4DDs help people to get more out of their interactions Multiple potential outcomes: Design for impact, but don’t assume you can be “everything to everybody.” Opening highly effective networks can bring in key perspectives for faster innovation Outcome Examples 1. Solve group interaction problems 2. Get focused, get answers 3. Build individual confidence 1. Learning/innovation 2. Member support 3. Translation/ Local Adaptation 4. Horizontal Coordination 1. Assess market faster 2. Iterate, pivot, incubate faster 3. Get capacity, capital, IP Strengths Improve ideation Improve involvement Team/group growth Reach and scale Diversity, experimentation, bridging Individual growth Expanded reach and scale Multiplied diversity, experimentation, bridging; Ecosystem growth Weaknesses Easily counteracted by strong personalities Facilitation and sponsorship are often overlooked requirements Legal and relationship management can be costly From Interaction to Network to Ecosystem 37
  38. 38. Future of Work: Planning Exercise 38
  39. 39. So, you are regrouping from Covid…… Think of the most challenging area of your business or your community that will need innovation. How can you use Open innovation to solve your business challenges?: What levers can you pull to improve your innovation network? - Build on your last exercise, but now use the 5 innovation levers and the open innovation framework (2 x 2) Future of work planning exercise 39
  40. 40. 40 What levers can you pull to improve your innovation network? - Build on your last exercise, but now use the 5 innovation levers and the open innovation framework (2 x 2)
  41. 41. 4 Discussion Disciplines Knowledge networks Open Innovation Objective Digital ideation; Foundation of psychologically safe and productive communication Sustainable ideation, vetting Foundation for process Ideas brought in, ideas sent out Leverage outside capabilities, capacity Headline Discussions start with people. 4DDs help people to get more out of their interactions Multiple potential outcomes: Design for impact, but don’t assume you can be “everything to everybody.” Opening highly effective networks can bring in key perspectives for faster innovation Outcome Examples 1. Solve group interaction problems 2. Get focused, get answers 3. Build individual confidence 1. Learning/innovation 2. Member support 3. Translation/ Local Adaptation 4. Horizontal Coordination 1. Assess market faster 2. Iterate, pivot, incubate faster 3. Get capacity, capital, IP Strengths Improve ideation Improve involvement Team/group growth Reach and scale Diversity, experimentation, bridging Individual growth Expanded reach and scale Multiplied diversity, experimentation, bridging; Ecosystem growth Weaknesses Easily counteracted by strong personalities Facilitation and sponsorship are often overlooked requirements Legal and relationship management can be costly From Interaction to Network to Ecosystem 41 Discussions start with people. 4DDs help people to get more out of their interactions. Multiple potential outcomes: Design for impact, but don’t assume you can be “everything to everybody.” Opening highly effective networks can bring in key perspectives for faster innovation.
  42. 42. THANK YOU Katrinabpugh@gmail.com Sheryl.skifstad@gmail.com 42
  43. 43. Presenters and Resources 43
  44. 44. Katrina PUGH, M.S./M.B.A. 44 Adjunct Faculty, Columbia University, President, AlignConsulting, New York and Boston USA Katrina Pugh is an Adjunct Faculty member and the former Academic Director of Columbia University’s Information and Knowledge Strategy (IKNS) Master of Science program. She specializes in business strategy, collaboration, social network analysis, and knowledge-driven transformation. Kate is general editor and co-author of Smarter Innovation: How Interactive Processes Drive Better Business Results (Ark Group, 2014), author of Sharing Hidden Know-How: How Managers Solve Thorny Problems with the Knowledge Jam (Jossey-Bass/Wiley, April 2011), and has published in the Harvard Business Review, Sloan Management Review, and Review of Economics and Statistics. Kate has over twenty years of consulting and industry experience in the financial services, health sciences, energy, information technology, and international development sectors.
  45. 45. Sheryl Skifstad, M.S., M.B.A., PMP 45 Program Manager in IT for Procter & Gamble, Member of P&G IT Expert Hall of Fame Since joining P&G 2.5 years ago, she has delivered multiple ebusiness projects supporting revolutionary new products for P&G. She has recently join the team as the CTO, working on a new acquisition of an environmentally friendly diaper start up. Prior to joining P&G, Sheryl had a long and varied career a Motorola including working on Communities of Practice with the opportunity to sponsor projects with the Columbia University’s Information and Knowledge Strategy (IKNS) Master of Science program. Other highlights from Motorola include leading a Project Management Organization and designing equipment for the Space Shuttle. She is also a co-author of Beyond netiquette: Discussion discipline drives innovation in Smarter Innovation: How Interactive Processes Drive Better Business Results (Ark Group, 2014)
  46. 46. Selected References • Algeo, Linger, Pugh PMI Report (2019), “ Building Project Management Capabilities with Knowledge Networks,” Project Management Institute Report, with Chivonne Algeo and Henry Linger, October, 2019. https://www.pmi.org/learning/library/knowledge-networks-cop-11798 • Dahlander, Linus and Siobhan O’Mahony, “A Study Shows How to Find New Ideas Inside and Outside the Company” (HBR Blog, July 18, 2017) https://hbr.org/2017/07/a-study-shows-how-to-find-new-ideas-inside-and-outside-the-company • Huston, Larry, VP for Innovation and Knowledge and NAbil Sakai, SVP for Corporate R&D (2006) “Connect and Develop Inside Procter and Gamble’s new model for Innovation” https://hbr.org/2006/03/connect-and-develop-inside-procter-gambles-new-model-for- innovation?referral=03759&cm_vc=rr_item_page.bottom • Kimberly A. Whitler (2019), “Big Firms Can't Innovate: How P&G Ventures Is Dispelling The Myth” Forbes, 4/13/2019 Kimberly A. Whitler is Senior Contributor CMO Network https://www.forbes.com/sites/kimberlywhitler/2019/04/13/how-pg-ventures-is-dispelling-the-big-company-myth/#630bf23f6f66 • Pugh, Katrina (2019), “Midwest KM Symposium Conversation AI and AI for Conversation: Our role as KM’ers?”, https://www.slideshare.net/Katepugh/midwest-km-pugh-conversational-ai-and-ai-for-conversation-190809 • Pugh, K., & Prusak, L. (2013). Designing Effective Knowledge Networks. MIT Sloan Management Review, 55(1), 79- 99.http://sloanreview.mit.edu/article/designing-effective-knowledg • Pugh, Katrina (2020), “In the Digital Fray, Don’t just Converse. Collaborate!” Article in Linked In 3/30/20 https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/digital-fray-dont- just-converse-collaborate-katrina-kate-pugh • Pugh, Katrina (2017), “SIKM Leaders Collaboration and four discussion disciplines” https://www.slideshare.net/Katepugh/pugh-collaboration-and-four- discussion-disciplines-for-sikm-171017 • Pugh, Katrina (2016), “Four Discussion Disciplines Drive Effective Online Collaboration,” https://sps.columbia.edu/news/four-discussion-disciplines-drive- effective-online-collaboration , Columbia School of Professional Services, 2016. • RedHat (2016), Open Source Way https://opensource.com/open-source-way • Skifstad, Sheryl and Katrina Pugh (2014), “Beyond Netiquette,” In Smarter Innovation, 2014. https://www.amazon.com/Smarter-Innovation-Interactive- Processes-Business/dp/1783581395 • Takahashi, M., Indulska, M., & Steen, J. (2018). Collaborative Research Project Networks: Knowledge Transfer at the Fuzzy Front End of Innovation. Project Management Journal, 49(4), 36-52. • Whitehurst, Jim (2016) CEO of Red Hat, wrote book by this name. https://www.amazon.com/Open-Organization-Igniting-Passion- Performance/dp/1511392460 46
  47. 47. Scope and design KN using KN Effectiveness Framework KN Behavior, Dynamics (illustrative) 8DDs (+ #1,2,8) (illustrative)000 KN Outcomes Are we trying to create an artifact that can scale? Or, is the goal the network potential itself Product Think: scalability Members Think: social capital Learning/ Innovation (e.g., SOPs) Coordination (e.g., food co-op) Capturing best practices on how reading impacts economic growth, equity Each member feels safe to raise concerns about their adequacy to stand up to 'Big tech.' Translation/ Local Adaptation (e.g., peer assist) Member/ Member Support (e.g., mentoring) CoP/KN members share their concerns around local political capital and develop own local library funding policies 5 Operating Model 6 Convening structures 7 Facilitation/ Social Norm Library buying cooperative purchase together and coordinate open source activity for eBooks One network member calls upon a fellow member to help prepare for a meeting. 4 Inclusion/ Participation 3 Expert-learner balance Broad impact/ outcome? 47
  48. 48. Where do we compete? How do we win? How do we Sustain competitive advantage? 1. Bridging 2. Social integration 3. Capability Assessment 4. Market and industry exploration 6. Innovation ecology 5. Commer- cialization Pugh, Smarter Innovation, Ark Group, 2014 Smarter Innovation: 6 dimensions 48

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In this session we talk about the imperative to use networks and collaboration for innovation. We provide four tools for doing this: 1. Network effectiveness framework (for designing the network for innovation outcomes) 2. Four Discussion Disciplines (for improving the day to day interactions for innovation) 3. Innovation Network levers (for systematically infusing network and conversation practices into the innovation levers) 4. Open Innovation model (for discerning who's participating, and how, as innovation opens up to include outside brains, ideas, and funds). This presentation features research and practice, and we hope to collaborate with others working in innovation to improve our shared innovation network models. .

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