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Km world 2020 diversity and gender in communities 201119 final

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What can we do to make our networks more inclusive and generative? This presentation by Kate Pugh, Nancy Dixon and April Allen illustrates learnings from the SIKM Gender and Diversity study and new blueprint, and other networks.

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Km world 2020 diversity and gender in communities 201119 final

  1. 1. Cognitive and Gender Diversity in Communities Aprill Allen, Knowledge Bird (aprill@knowledgebird.com) Nancy Dixon, Common Knowledge (nancydixon@commonknowledge.org) Katrina Pugh, Columbia University/AlignConsulting (kp2462@columbia.edu) KM World, November 19, 2020
  2. 2. Key messages • CoPs are an indispensable contribution to any organization’s KM program. They can also cause hurt feelings and distress. • It is important for CoP leaders to be aware of the differences and biases that diverse participants bring to CoP discussions. • SIKM Leaders, CompanyCommand, Intel Enterprise Architects, and The Australian Centre for Social Innovation are communities seeking to work with diversity. • Refining what moderators choose to measure is one way to to address ongoing biases.
  3. 3. Cognitive diversity Cognitive diversity is differences in heuristics, perspectives, interpretations and mental models. Though it can be correlated with identity diversity (because of our upbringing), it is not always. Sometimes cognitive diversity is called “ways of knowing.” Do you remember or organize info with: • A list? • A process? • An “if-then” statement? • A feedback loop? • An org chart or social network map? Engineers have a different problem solving strategy than do physicians, musicians or attorneys.They approach problems in a different way.
  4. 4. Background
  5. 5. Community members achieve outcomes and build relationships by: ● Interacting on an ongoing basis ● Asking and answering questions ● Sharing their knowledge ● Reusing good ideas ● Solving problems for one another ● Co-developing new and better ways of doing things Communities are one of the best tools KM has But, communities can be places where people experience... ● Domination by people of higher status ● Misunderstandings ● Hurt feelings ● Bias ● People being shut down
  6. 6. Bias is Real in Communities Being critical associated with being smart (“Jerk Factor”) Availability bias Confirmation bias Fundamental attribution error In-group preference bias
  7. 7. SIKM Leaders: One example of seeking to understand gender and diversity in a community
  8. 8. Timeline Online Dialogue (Nov ‘19) 3 Focus groups (Jan ‘20) Check in with the SIKM Community leader on the draft findings (Feb ‘20) Survey of the whole community, authoring of the Blueprint (April ‘20) Revised Blueprint shared with the community (May ‘20) Kick off Champions role (June ‘20-present) Expand use of Groups.io, including hashtags, folders, doc links (Aug ’20) We noticed lack of diversity in SIKM Leaders What we did:
  9. 9. 13 women responded, then 8 men provided further reflections.  Questions to the women: 1. What factors influence whether or not you post or reply in this community? 2. Do you think there are any fundamental differences in the way men and women choose to post and reply? 3. Do you consider the imbalance of posts by gender to be a problem? If so, why? If not, why not? 4. What, if anything, can be done to increase the percentage of posts made by women? 5. What articles, books, posts, and research do you think are relevant to this discussion? Questions to the men: 1. What did you learn from the posts made so far? 2. How will this discussion affect your future posts and replies? 3. What other observations, suggestions, and related articles and books can you share?
  10. 10. What Members Said: Statistics on “difference” General Data • Women tend to post less • Women tend to ask more questions, once in a thread • Women tend to wait to build relationships first  • Gender differences may make it difficult to post: Full time jobs with child care responsibilities. Demographics of SIKM • Just under 900 members, 15 years old • SIKM has about 50-50 male:female membership • 80-20 participation, men to women  Diversity Big Picture • Many people suggested that a core issue is cognitive diversity, not just male/female, e.g., tenure, vendor or consultant.
  11. 11. What we found: Why women said they (don’t) post Women stay back when they find the content not relevant or excessive • Many smart people in the group, all good-intended, provide quick answers. • Some appear to post to build a reputation.   Several women said that they didn’t post because they • Felt mansplained • Competed with / raced to post • Felt shut down • Felt “imposter syndrome”
  12. 12. What we found: Stylistic differences in the way men and women post Stylistic differences 1. Abstraction (2 people) 2. Psychological safety (4 people) 3. Certainty (2 people) 4. Respect (2 people) “People who have visible or invisible power or authority, verbal quickness, etc. dominate verbal interactions, often with no self awareness.”
  13. 13. What we found: Stylistic differences in the way men and women post Stylistic differences 5. Dialogue (balance of inquiry v. Advocacy) (3 people) 6. Length (2 people) 7. Reputation (2 people) 8. Speed (5 comments) 9. Disregarding agreed upon rules (2 people) “ They include questions and invitation to others, rather than just stating their views, others wade in. If they wait sometimes and not rush to fill the void, new voices can more easily come in.”
  14. 14. What we found: Information consumption preferences ● Live, small group discussions ● Short, social media-length posts (more likely to encourage dialogue) “I find the email modality quite onerous for conversational discussions. The question is less around gender than around the question: are we simply sending back an email package of expertise, or are engaging in a dialogue?  "Packages of expertise" only interest me so far, but when I see an expanding conversation, I understand I may easily get more diverse perspectives, see more ways to make relevant contributions, etc.” 
  15. 15. From Focus Groups to a Blueprint ● Engaging each other on the platform ● Profiles ● Shared community management ● Live sessions & peer assists ● Discussion disciplines & norms
  16. 16. Four Discussion Disciplines (4DDs) Inclusion Translation Integrity Courtesy
  17. 17. Why 4DDs: Quick 4DD analysis of sample thread ● Women and men equally likely to use integrity (25%) (well-defended statements, clean questions) ● Inclusion was approximately every 10th move However, ● Over 30% of all moves were “anti” ● Women used courtesy approx 30% of their moves, men 16% ● Men used “anti- courtesy” approx. 25% of the time
  18. 18. Translation - Actively connect the dots, driving toward action Inclusion - Advocate for language and practice that includes others. Translation - Synthesize, integrate the truth, even if it’s difficult to do so. Courtesy - Yield to others; don’t be selfish Inclusion - Reach out/in for difference Integrity– Have humility Inclusion - Reach-out/in for learning Integrity– Have agency. Ask tough questions. Becoming welcome with the Blueprint Andrew M. Ibrahim MD, MSc is an Assistant Professor of Surgery, Architecture & Urban Planning at the University of Michigan and Chief Medical Officer at HOK, a global design and architecture firm. This free graphic is available (with attribution) here: https://umich.app.box.com/s/d1zl3r2dlso7gs76wjfybv9z52m397ho Welcoming Diversity
  19. 19. Actions in progress ● 6 month pilot of Community Champions rotation ● New member journey ● Member directory ● Introducing topical live video sessions
  20. 20. Examples of other communities on journeys
  21. 21. CompanyCommand • Community of 2000 U.S. Army Company Commanders that helped each other face the challenges of both preparing for war and fighting a war in the field. • • Lead by a team of 5 Company Commanders
  22. 22. For each contribution moderators: ● Thank the contributor for their contribution ● Affirm the contributor’s belonging to the community: “You’re an important part of our community. Your recent contribution will really help peers….” ● Improve the contribution - spelling mistakes, grammer, links to other documents, suggestions for how to rephrase critical comments “I think what you were trying to say was….”
  23. 23. Intel Solution Services Enterprise Architects Community Goal — Unite Enterprise architects across three divisions. Profile — Senior architects in server, IT, solutions divisions, scattered across the US, Europe & China Structure — Core team (4), working groups, monthly live meeting Norms — “Working out loud,” “Dial for dollars” (reach across) Accomplishments — Evaluated and made decision to standardize on one enterprise architecture standard, lobbied successfully for enterprise-level funding. Established monthly presentation schedule, which was attended by 50-70% of members. Results — Received prestigious CIO award, cohesion across BUs with different “status.”
  24. 24. The Australian Centre for Social Innovation works with governments, businesses and communities to build the conditions for social innovation. 1. Start with where people are at 2. Prioritise action and experimentation 3. Enable learning from people and systems 4. Build peer support 5. Amplify, bridge and stop 6. Design for exit and scale
  25. 25. Challenge: Your measurement plan?
  26. 26. Typical CoP Measures ● Number of Network Members ● Number of Active Members ● Number of Questions asked per month ● Number of Answers per questions ● Average time to first answer ● Quantitative cases (just starting to see - e.g., sharing improving the next sale)
  27. 27. Why measure? ● So that we know we are doing something valuable ● So that we know if anything is missing or not working, so we can fix it ● So that we know who is doing a great job, and needs thanks ● So that we know if there are some people for whom the network is not welcoming, so we can fix it
  28. 28. What do you measure?   ● It is easy to measure things like number of post; speed of responding, etc. ● Do you measure how it is: ○ valuable ○ inclusive ○ welcoming ○ appreciative?
  29. 29. Activity
  30. 30. What will YOU measure to determine if your community is: Valuable, Inclusive, Welcoming, and Appreciative?
  31. 31. Appendix References, Bios, Contact Info
  32. 32. Blueprint details
  33. 33. Some References • Curtis, Dr C et al (2018). “Examples and emerging insights from TACSI’s big change work.” https://www.tacsi.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/TACSI_big_change.pdf • Delizonna, Laura (2017). “High Performing Teams Need Psychological Safety. Here’s How to Create it.” https://hbr.org/2017/08/high-performing-teams-need-psychological-safety-heres-how-to-create-it • Dixon, Nancy, Polarization: The Power of Dialogue and the Problem of Implicit Bias https://www.nancydixonblog.com/2020/10/polarization-the-power-of-dialogue-and-the-problem-of-implicit-bias-.html • Dixon, Nancy, How A Few Simple Ground Rules Can Help Polarized Groups Hold Civil Conversations With Each Other https://www.nancydixonblog.com/2020/09/how-a-few-simple-ground-rules-can-help-polarized-groups-hold-civil-conversations-with-each-other.ht ml • Edmondson, Amy, Team Learning and Psychological Safety Survey. https://www.midss.org/content/team-learning-and-psychological-safety-survey • Isaacs, William (1999). Dialogue and the Art of Thinking Together. New York: Doubleday. • Minnesota State (2018), 12 Cognitive Biases That Can Impact Search Committee Decisions (infographic). https://www.minnstate.edu/SYSTEM/hr/talent_management/documents/12%20Cognitive%20Biases%20Infographic%20v%204.pdf • Neuroleadership Institute 2020 Forbes articles on leading diversity: https://www.forbes.com/sites/davidrock/2020/06/03/leadership-in-this-moment-listen-deeply-unite-widely-act-boldly/#15102be322cd and https://www.forbes.com/sites/khalilsmith/2020/01/09/should-i-be-focusing-on-di-or-id/#9010e2eca47d • Pugh, Katrina (2020). “In the Digital Fray, Don’t Just Converse. Collaborate!” (LinkedIn Article) https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/digital-fray-dont-just-converse-collaborate-katrina-kate-pugh (This is a comprehensive summary of the 4 Discussion Disciplines) • Pugh, Katrina (2016). “Four Disciplines Drive Effective Online Collaboration.” Columbia School of Professional Studies News, February 1, 2016. https://sps.columbia.edu/news/four-discussion-disciplines-drive-effective-online-collaboration • Pugh and Prusak (2013), “Designing Effective Knowledge Networks “ MIT Sloan Management Review. • Settle Murphy, Nancy, Guided Insights, and Katrina Pugh, Columbia University, “How Inclusion and integrity foster more productive conversations and reduce bias in a virtual world.” • https://www.guidedinsights.com/how-inclusion-and-integrity-foster-more-productive-conversations-reduce-bias-in-a-virtual-world/ (10/19/20) • Settle Murphy, Guided Insights, and Katrina Pugh, Columbia University, "Healthy Conversations Can Bring Virtual Teams Back to Life." • https://www.guidedinsights.com/healthy-conversations-can-bring-%EF%BB%BFvirtual-teams-back-to-life/ 8/19/20
  34. 34. Aprill Allen Aprill Allen is a knowledge management specialist and managing director of boutique consulting firm, Knowledge Bird. Knowledge Bird conducts Knowledge Centered Service training and coaching; and helps startups and enterprise service desks provide better customer experiences at scale. She is also passionate about improving the career landscape for knowledge managers by understanding the nature of the work in her 2019 KM Careers Survey (A/NZ), and providing a niche KM Jobs board. As a founding member of the Australian Community Managers organisation, she hopes to strengthen the relationship between knowledge management and the growing online community management specialisation.
  35. 35. Nancy Dixon Nancy Dixon is a thought leader in the field of Knowledge Management. She has been a consultant to the most celebrated knowledge management companies with a rich experience in the corporate, government and international development sectors. Before founding Common Knowledge Associates in 2000, she was a Professor at the George Washington University for 15 years, and before that at the University of Texas, in Austin. She holds a Ph.D. in Administration with a minor in Sociology. She currently is on the faculty of IKNS at Columbia University, teaching Dialogue and Researching Advanced Knowledge Concepts. Her latest articles include: • Learning Together and Working Apart, The Learning Organization, The Learning Organization Vol. 24 Issue: 3, pp.138-149, 2017. • The Three Eras of Knowledge Management, in KM Matters, (ed) Girard, 2017. • Glimpses of Organizations in the Act of Learning, Oxford Handbook of the Learning Organization, pp. 273-288, 2020.
  36. 36. Katrina Pugh, M.S./M.B.A. Katrina Pugh is Adjunct Faculty and the former Academic Director of Columbia University’s Information and Knowledge Strategy (IKNS) Master of Science program. She specializes in business strategy, collaboration, social network analysis, and knowledge-driven transformation. President of AlignConsulting, Kate has over twenty years of consulting and industry experience in the financial services, health sciences, energy, information technology, and international development sectors. Kate is general editor and co-author of Smarter Innovation: How Interactive Processes Drive Better Business Results (Ark Group, 2014), author of Sharing Hidden Know-How: How Managers Solve Thorny Problems with the Knowledge Jam (Jossey-Bass/Wiley, April 2011), and has published in the Harvard Business Review, Sloan Management Review, and Review of Economics and Statistics.

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What can we do to make our networks more inclusive and generative? This presentation by Kate Pugh, Nancy Dixon and April Allen illustrates learnings from the SIKM Gender and Diversity study and new blueprint, and other networks.

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