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Delivering Dublin's Future Cycle Network

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Slide's for the Dublin Cycling Campaign presentation on how we can build Dublin's cycling network. The presentation answers the following questions:

Why do we need to build a connected cycle network in Dublin?
What is the current process for building new cycle infrastructure in Dublin?
How long will it take to build Dublin’s cycle network at the current rate?
How can we can we speed the process of delivering new cycle routes?

The presentation was created by Kevin Baker. Kevin is an active member of Dublin Cycling Campaign’s infrastructure working group, working on projects like the Fitzwilliam Cycle Route and the interim Liffey Cycle Route. He also previously led Dublin Cycling Campaign’s response to the proposals for 200km of cycle route as part of the National Transport Authority’s BusConnects Core Bus Corridors programme.

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
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Delivering Dublin's Future Cycle Network

  1. 1. Delivering Dublin’s Cycle Network
  2. 2. Agenda ● Why do we need to build a network of cycle routes? ● What is a cycle network? ● What progress have we made? ● What is the process for building new cycle infrastructure? ● What is delaying new cycle infrastructure? ● How can we can we speed up delivery?
  3. 3. Why do we need to build a cycle network?
  4. 4. “Our vision for Dublin is a vibrant, liveable city where everyone can enjoy everyday walking and cycling” Dublin Cycling Campaign’s Vision
  5. 5. The three things people need to cycle 1. Access to a suitable cycle 2. The appropriate knowledge to cycle 3. A cycle route suitable for their needs Why people travel the way they do is a deeply personal choice based on a huge number of criteria
  6. 6. Four types of ‘cyclists’ Source: Dr Jennifer Dill, Professor Urban Studies & Planning, Portland State University, Oregon USA
  7. 7. Strong and fearless 4-7%
  8. 8. Enthused and confident 5-9%
  9. 9. Interested but concerned 50-60%
  10. 10. Interested but concerned 50-60%
  11. 11. Reasons why Dubliners do not cycle or cycle less often Source: Bike Life 2019; National Transport Authority
  12. 12. Proportion of Dubliners in different demographic groups who cycle at least once a week Source: Bike Life 2019; National Transport Authority
  13. 13. We need a network of cycle routes that are suitable for everyone of all ages and abilities
  14. 14. What is a cycle network?
  15. 15. What is a cycle network? Sections
  16. 16. What is a cycle network? Sections Intersections
  17. 17. What is a cycle network? Sections Intersections Route
  18. 18. What is a cycle network? Sections Intersections Route Network
  19. 19. 235km Primary Routes 383km Secondary Routes 434km Feeder Routes 200km Greenway
  20. 20. Progress?
  21. 21. 84/818 km ~10% Source: Bike Life 2019; National Transport Authority
  22. 22. Cycling projects delivered last 7 years
  23. 23. Kilometres of cycle in delivered last 7 years
  24. 24. It will take 280 years to build Dublin’s cycle network at 2014-2019 pace
  25. 25. It will take 25 years to build Dublin’s cycle network at 2020 pace
  26. 26. Projects in development
  27. 27. Existing
  28. 28. Under Construction
  29. 29. Approved Projects
  30. 30. BusConnects
  31. 31. Early Stages
  32. 32. Potential Future
  33. 33. Chicken and egg problem for cycling
  34. 34. “Cycling is a niche activity for a small subsection of the population. Investing in cycling won’t make a meaningful contribution to Ireland’s transport problems” – Too Many Key Decision Makers in Ireland
  35. 35. “Seeing is believing”
  36. 36. “Seeing is believing but feeling is truth”
  37. 37. How does cycle infrastructure get built?
  38. 38. Engineers, architects, transport planners, communications staff Money needed to design, build and maintain a project Key stakeholders are bought in on the need for change
  39. 39. Cycle of Change Enable People Cycling Positive feedback loop if more people START cycling because of... ● Building safe cycle routes ● Easier access to cycles ● Seeing ‘more people like me’ cycling ● Learnt necessary knowledge and skills Negative feedback loop if more people QUIT cycling because of... ● Experience road danger / abuse ● Apathetic Garda response ● Stolen cycle ● Changing life circumstances
  40. 40. National Agencies Local Authorities
  41. 41. Development Stages 1. Concept Design 2. Preliminary Design 3. Statutory Approval Process 4. Detailed Design 5. Procurement 6. Construction
  42. 42. Planning Permission for Cycle Infrastructure ● Section 38 of the Road Traffic Act 1994 ● Part 8 of the Planning and Development Regulations 2001 ● Planning Act 2000 & Roads Act 1993 ● Private developments via Planning and Development Act 2000
  43. 43. Section 38 ● Can be used to provide “traffic calming measures” including cycle lanes ● Conditions: ○ Council can change existing roads ○ No road widening. Must stay within existing boundaries ● Only needs the council officials approval ● Approval period: 2-8 weeks
  44. 44. Lombard Street
  45. 45. Grangegorman Road Lower
  46. 46. Interim Liffey Cycle Route
  47. 47. Benildus Avenue
  48. 48. Coastal Mobility Route
  49. 49. Part 8 ● Council advertises project. The public can make submissions. ● Councillors vote to approve or reject the project ● Any compulsory purchase orders need to be approved by An Bord Pleanála ● Requires a proper planning application (3-9 months preparation) ● Approval process (4 months)
  50. 50. Bawnogue, Clondalkin
  51. 51. Royal Canal Greenway Phase 2
  52. 52. Dodder Bridge, Tallaght
  53. 53. Projects that need An Bord Pleanála approval ● Various sections of the Planning Act 2000 and Roads Act 1993 ● Need an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) ○ Large-scale construction projects ○ Projects with potentially significant environmental impacts ● Preparing an application takes 12-24 months ● An Bord Pleanála decision takes 9-18 months
  54. 54. Baldoyle Greenway
  55. 55. Private Developments ● Private developer upgrades existing public road beside development ● Delivery local cycle network within developments ● Quality varies dramatically ● Can be small but significant contribution
  56. 56. Example Projects
  57. 57. Clontarf to City Centre 2.7km project from Alfie Byrne Road to Talbot Street via North Strand Road ● Original Part 8 2014 ● Second Part 8 September 2017 ● Tenders December 2020 ● Construction Q3 2021 ● Completed Q1 2023 9 YEARS!
  58. 58. Clontarf to City Centre Delays ● Novel design elements (junctions, bus stops, kerbs) ● Scope creep ● Major utility changes ● Irish Water not wanting to pay for water main upgrades ● Growing cost estimates and multiple business cases ● Backseat driving from National Transport Authority ● Huge number of community stakeholders ● Old coal cellars under the road
  59. 59. Clontarf to City Centre Timeline Slippage When Timeline Announced Construction Date Completed Date September 2019 Q1 2020 Q4 2021 November 2019 Q2 2020 +3 months Q2 2022 +6 months February 2020 Q3 2020 +6 months Q3 2022 +9 months June 2020 Q1 2021 +12 months November 2020 Q3 2021 +18 months Q1 2023 +15 months
  60. 60. Royal Canal Greenway Phase 2
  61. 61. Royal Canal Greenway Phase 2 Approved in December 2015 Opened in July 2020 Delay Reasons: ● Liaising with Irish Rail and Waterways Ireland ● Potential conflicts with DART+ Programme ● Council staff re-assigned to other projects (Luas Cross City) ● No funding available to build the project (~€8M)
  62. 62. Sandymount to Blackrock Published October 2016 Abandoned April 2018 Cancellation Reasons: ● Complaints over new road bridge ● Complaints over compulsory purchases ● Complaints over making Seapoint Avenue one-way ● Only handful of 680 submissions supportive
  63. 63. Latest Plans of Action
  64. 64. Cycling Implementation Plan 2020 - 2024 ● Written in 2019 ● Approved by the NTA’s board in December 2019 ● Never published
  65. 65. Cycling Implementation Plan 2020 - 2024 ● Protected Cycle Track Projects: 110km ● BusConnects Dublin: 50km ● Average: 32km/year
  66. 66. Dublin City Council Plans “The Programme for Government envisages funding for cycling and walking projects of €360 million a year for the next five years.” “The project team has drawn from lessons learned on how cycle projects have been delivered up to now; what has worked and what has not; and how delivery can be speeded up“ Plan for 2021-2025 increases from 54 kilometres to 150-200 kilometres Source: Report 278/2020; Dublin City Council
  67. 67. Dublin City Council Tiers Tier 4: Major multi-sectoral projects Tier 2: Minor complexity projects Tier 3: Major complexity projects Tier 1: Trials, bollards and wands Section 38 of the Road Traffic Act Part 8 or ABP Approval Required } }
  68. 68. Cycle South Dublin
  69. 69. Dún Laoghaire Rathdown County Council
  70. 70. Fingal County Council
  71. 71. How do we speed up delivery?
  72. 72. Cycle of Change Enable People Cycling Positive feedback loop if people START cycling Negative feedback loop if people QUIT cycling
  73. 73. Grangegorman Road Lower
  74. 74. Constitution Hill
  75. 75. Interim Liffey Cycle Route
  76. 76. Coastal Mobility Route
  77. 77. Liffey Cycle Route
  78. 78. Reallocating existing road space is a political problem not an engineering problem
  79. 79. How can you help?
  80. 80. How you can help... ● Join Dublin Cycling Campaign ● Engage and be supportive in public consultations ● Talk to your local politicians ● Encourage family, friends and co-workers to start cycling ● Talk to your neighbours ● Volunteer with Dublin Cycling Campaign

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