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Introduction to Shop Floor management - Janaury 2017

What are roles and responsibilities of a Shop Floor supervisor.

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Introduction to Shop Floor management - Janaury 2017

  1. 1. 1Marek.Piatkowski@Rogers.com Shop Floor Management Introduction Thinkingwin, Win, WIN Shop Floor Management Introduction Marek Piatkowski – January 2017 Thinkingwin, Win, WIN
  2. 2. 2Marek.Piatkowski@Rogers.com Shop Floor Management Introduction Thinkingwin, Win, WIN Introduction - Marek Piatkowski  Professional Background  Toyota Motor Manufacturing Canada (TMMC) - Cambridge, Ontario from 1987-1994  TPS/Lean Transformation Consulting - since 1994  Professional Affiliations  TWI Network – John Shook, Founder  Lean Enterprise Institute (LEI) – Jim Womack  Lean Enterprise Academy (LEA) – Daniel Jones  CCM/CAINTRA – Monterrey, Mexico  SME, AME, ASQ, CME  Lean Manufacturing Solutions - Toronto, Canada http://twi-network.com
  3. 3. 3Marek.Piatkowski@Rogers.com Shop Floor Management Introduction Thinkingwin, Win, WIN
  4. 4. 4Marek.Piatkowski@Rogers.com Shop Floor Management Introduction Thinkingwin, Win, WIN What is Shop Floor Management Shop Floor management means developing and controlling:  Management System:  Organization - People  Procedures  Information  Management techniques  A Physical System  Plant – building and equipment  Production methods  Transportation and delivery methods To economically manufacture products of certain value and quality, in certain volume and within a certain time period.
  5. 5. 5Marek.Piatkowski@Rogers.com Shop Floor Management Introduction Thinkingwin, Win, WIN Toyota’s Philosophy – Manager’s Role  In a true TPS environment decision making process should be made at the lowest possible level of the organization.  Simple, effective solutions are the most effective  A manager’s or supervisor’s role consists of leading problem solving activities in a multi-skilled, cross-functional team environment  Managers role is to make sure that for everything that we do there is a well defined standard process  Continuous Improvement (Kaizen) activities are management responsibilities.
  6. 6. 6Marek.Piatkowski@Rogers.com Shop Floor Management Introduction Thinkingwin, Win, WIN Two Types of Problems Sub-standard performance, abnormal situation New Standard New Challenge 1. Daily problems: deviation from normality breakdown quick fixes 2. Long term improvements: new company objectives new expectations looking for a better long term solution
  7. 7. 7Marek.Piatkowski@Rogers.com Shop Floor Management Introduction Thinkingwin, Win, WIN TPS System Rules Rule 2: Every customer-supplier connection must be direct, and there must be a unmistakable yes- or-no way to send requests and receive responses Rule 1: All work shall be highly specified (standardized) as to content, sequence, timing and outcome Rule 3: The pathway for every product and service must be simple and direct – flow Rule 4: Any improvement must be made in accordance with the scientific method, under the guidance of a teacher, at the lowest possible level in the organization
  8. 8. 8Marek.Piatkowski@Rogers.com Shop Floor Management Introduction Thinkingwin, Win, WIN TPS Leadership Style  TPS Leaders have to be quick studies, nimble, and trusting of their employees  Having deep skills and technological experience is not enough  Becoming a Leader, at any level, requires the development and utilization of strong people skills  TPS Leadership is exclusively about people – you do not lead machines or processes, you lead people
  9. 9. 9Marek.Piatkowski@Rogers.com Shop Floor Management Introduction Thinkingwin, Win, WIN Two Types of Shop Floor Management Activities Daily Shop Floor Management Shop Floor Continuous Improvements Development of Leadership Skills and understanding of Roles and Responsibilities of a Supervisor or Manager through daily practices, coaching and On-the-Job Training (OJT).
  10. 10. 10Marek.Piatkowski@Rogers.com Shop Floor Management Introduction Thinkingwin, Win, WIN Daily Shop Floor Management (SFM)  Basic duties of the Shop Floor personnel (Managers, Group Leaders, Team Leaders) are to direct and manage resources and processes, so that the company’s quality, delivery and cost plans and goals are achieved.  Quality, delivery and costs are three primary production targets based on customer requirements for components and production. There are also three secondary targets productivity, safety and morale, which also should be a part of daily managerial activity.  SFM are daily activities performed on regular and frequent basis to address and prevent any existing (current) or any potential problems related to availability and performance of equipment, materials, people, information and methods. Daily Shop Floor Management
  11. 11. 11Marek.Piatkowski@Rogers.com Shop Floor Management Introduction Thinkingwin, Win, WIN Daily Shop Floor Management  Shop Floor Management (SFM) is about making sure that the systems are working properly and according to plans  When there is a problem or a potential of a problem take immediate corrective action to restore the system to proper function  SFM focuses on daily performance  Solve the problem now, so it does not happen again the next hour, shift, day, week, or month. Only by doing this will we be able to get out of Fire Fighting mode and into controlled performance  Walk, stop, look, listen and then ask questions  If something is not right, correct the problem immediately. Do not walk by it without action or add it to your “list”. Correct the problem. Daily Shop Floor Management
  12. 12. 12Marek.Piatkowski@Rogers.com Shop Floor Management Introduction Thinkingwin, Win, WIN Daily Shop Floor Management - Tools and Methodologies Tools  Workplace Organization - 5S  Visual Management  Information Centers  Standardized Work for Leaders Methodologies  Daily Team Meetings  Daily Management Walk About  Support Team  Gemba Walks – Process Audit Daily Shop Floor Management
  13. 13. 13Marek.Piatkowski@Rogers.com Shop Floor Management Introduction Thinkingwin, Win, WIN Management of Visual Management Indicators  Identify, review and monitor key control indicators in the following areas:  Safety: number of near-misses, number of accidents, number of consecutive days without an accident, ...  Quality: scrap, process defect rate, rework, repairs, process capability, ...  Delivery: schedule attainment, quantity, date and sequence, utilization rate, delivery date, fulfillment rate, daily delivery rate, delay rate,...  Productivity: quantity produced per unit time or per man-hours, lead times, number of time each unit is handled by the operator, machine downtime, ...  Cost: material costs, labor costs, expenses, cost per unit,...  People: attendance rate, participation in daily meetings, number of submitted suggestions, job rotation, training, Standardized Work, participation in problem solving and improvement activities, … Daily Shop Floor Management SAFETY QUALITY DELIVERY PRODUCTIVITY COST PEOPLE
  14. 14. 14Marek.Piatkowski@Rogers.com Shop Floor Management Introduction Thinkingwin, Win, WIN Managing Continuous Improvement (Kaizen) on a Shop Floor  Continuous Improvement , also know as Kaizen, is the ongoing improvement of products, services or processes through incremental and breakthrough improvements.  Kaizen is a step-by-step approach towards solving problems and identifying opportunities for continuous improvement  Continuous Improvement, is a long-term approach to work that systematically seeks to achieve small, incremental changes in processes in order to improve efficiency and quality.  At Toyota Continuous Improvement it is not just a responsibility of a manager or a supervisors, but also a responsibility of every worker.  The Continuous Improvement process is reinforced in daily management, daily problem solving, quality circles, improvement events and A3s. Shop Floor Continuous Improvements
  15. 15. 15Marek.Piatkowski@Rogers.com Shop Floor Management Introduction Thinkingwin, Win, WIN Teamwork - Definition of a Team  Work Team – a group of people working together towards common goals and objectives  Workgroup - a collection of people (employees) in need of a pay check brought together to make products, provide service and to achieve company objectives  You need to teach your employees a standardized and a well defined problems solving and continuous improvement process
  16. 16. 16Marek.Piatkowski@Rogers.com Shop Floor Management Introduction Thinkingwin, Win, WIN Problems with Continuous Improvement Activities  A common problem with Continuous Improvement is that we look at this as:  An extra activity - something to do on top of my “Daily Work”  Middle management says – this is nice, but I have no time for this, I need to run my operation, I have targets to meet  Operation people say – Continuous Improvement is OK, but we have no input how things are improved her, all these Experts are telling us what to do  Our biggest mistake is that we separate Daily Work from Continuous Improvement  We look at these two activities as something completely different – they continuously clash with each other. We look at Continuous Improvement as something that stops me from doing my daily work. And that is wrong.  A key to our success is to make Continuous Improvement as a part of our Daily Business Shop Floor Continuous Improvements
  17. 17. 17Marek.Piatkowski@Rogers.com Shop Floor Management Introduction Thinkingwin, Win, WIN Shop Floor Continuous Improvements Process Improvement SFM - Tools and Methodologies Tools  Value Stream Mapping  PDCA  Practical Problem Solving  A3 Report Methodologies  Standardized Work  Kaizen – Continuous Improvement  Quality Circles  Improvement Kata
  18. 18. 18Marek.Piatkowski@Rogers.com Shop Floor Management Introduction Thinkingwin, Win, WIN “If you want to teach people a new way of thinking, don’t bother trying to teach them. Instead, give them a tool, the use of it will lead to new ways of thinking” R. Buckminster Fuller was a 20th century inventor and visionary who did not limit himself to one field but worked as a 'comprehensive anticipatory design scientist' to solve global problems. Fuller's ideas and work continue to influence new generations of designers, architects, scientists and artists working to create a sustainable planet.
  19. 19. 19Marek.Piatkowski@Rogers.com Shop Floor Management Introduction Thinkingwin, Win, WIN Changing the World. One Transformation at a time This presentation is an intellectual property of W3 Group Canada Inc. No parts of this document can be copied or reproduced without written permission from: Marek Piatkowski W3 Group Canada Inc. iPhone: 416-235-2631 Cell: 248-207-0416 Marek.Piatkowski@rogers.com http://twi-network.com Thinkingwin, Win, WIN
  20. 20. 20Marek.Piatkowski@Rogers.com Shop Floor Management Introduction Thinkingwin, Win, WIN Presentations in this Workshop 1. Log in to: www.slideshare.net 2. Type in my name in search area: Marek Piatkowski 3. Select a presentation you want to see 4. Learn and Enjoy

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