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Group Event Project Plan

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Group Event Project Plan

  1. 1. Coursework Header Sheet 214033-7 Course CATE1138: Events Projects in Practice Course School/Level BU/PG Coursework Group Event Project Plan Assessment Weight 40.00% Tutor KB Malik Submission Deadline 06/03/2014 Coursework is receipted on the understanding that it is the student's own work and that it has not, in whole or part, been presented elsewhere for assessment. Where material has been used from other sources it has been properly acknowledged in accordance with the University's Regulations regarding Cheating and Plagiarism. 000784821 Livio Bergamin Tutor's comments Grade Awarded___________ For Office Use Only__________ Final Grade_________ Moderation required: yes/no Tutor______________________ Date _______________
  2. 2. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 2 MA Events Management Group Event Project Plan Go Online Conference Events Projects in Practice (CATE 1138) Business School Lecturer:Bari Malik, Robert Davidson Date: 6. March 2014 Authors: Livio Bergamin, 000784821 Nicola Rowe, 000795953 Pedro Beirao, 000796046 Sam Hopkins 000790632 Weiwei Liu, 000748961
  3. 3. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 3 Table of content 1. Executive Summary ....................................................................................................... 4 2. Feasibility ....................................................................................................................... 4 2.1 Operations ................................................................................................................... 4 2.2 Finance Plan................................................................................................................ 7 2.3 Marketing Plan............................................................................................................11 3. Work Breakdown Structure............................................................................................14 4. Resourcing....................................................................................................................14 5. Critical Path Analysis.....................................................................................................14 6. Health and Safety Risk Management ............................................................................15 7. References....................................................................................................................17 8. Appendix .......................................................................................................................22 List of Figures and Tables Figure 1: Break-even point chart ........................................................................................... 9 Table 1: Programme of conference ....................................................................................... 7 Table 2: Profit and loss account ............................................................................................ 8 Table 3: Cash flow statement ...............................................................................................10 Table 4: Total float of activities .............................................................................................15
  4. 4. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 4 1. Executive Summary According to Gutwein (2013) it is imperative for companies to be online and business that are generate far greater revenues than those which are not. However Harding (2013) mentions that being online is only effective if done properly. With this in mind, the ‘Go Online Conference’ aims to raise awareness of the importance of being online for both small and medium sized companies. Furthermore it emphasizes the crucial circumstances to consider when a company goes online and focuses on why an organisation should go online. Through this conference participates will be encouraged to develop an online presence and hence profit in various ways, e.g. enhanced customer support, improved company image, cost reductions and a larger global audience (The Web Doctor, 2014). As it can be seen, there seems to be a need within this field and therefore the chosen theme has the potential for a successful conference (Bladen, et al., 2012). 2. Feasibility In order to introduce the chosen concept of the event and to prove its feasibility, it is necessary to follow a given structure. Goldblatt (2005) provides the appropriate framework for this matter, named the 5W’s: Why, Who, When, Where and What. The following sections look at each of those W’s and describe those accordingly to the conference. Moreover an additional approach by Shone and Perry (2013) is being applied and combined which divides the feasibility in three parts: Operations, Finance and Marketing. 2.1 Operations The first section clearly displayed the need for such a conference. Roychowdhury (2008) states, that the current demand for e-commerce contains great possibilities for businesses. Furthermore he points out that this action of self-promotion can reach millions of potential customers and is therefore considerably cheap and effective. These justifications clearly point out why such a conference has a very promising potential.
  5. 5. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 5 According to Krugman et al (2007) it is crucial to choose a location which appeals to the attendees. Due to the fact that the conference is targeting mainly companies within the UK, the city of London is an adequate choice. In addition to that London is one of the most popular cities in the world for business events, which can be favourable when searching for appropriate venues. The conference will take place within a hotel facility in order to serve the potential customers completely. The advantage of holding the conference within a hotel is that the infrastructure such as room, equipment and their services are already available. London as location and a hotel as a venue, does fulfil the defined important selection criteria highlighted by Buhalis and Costa (2006: 60) such as: Access to the location, technical conditions, appropriate capacity, service and quality, quality food and beverage, control of infrastructure and breakout possibilities. As mentioned previously, there exist several reasons why online business does make sense for organisations. According to Yodle (2013) about 50% of small and medium businesses are not online and do not investigate the results of their marketing results. Therefore the conference targets medium and small sized developed businesses as well as start-up companies to raise their awareness about being online from a very early stage. In addition the potential customers are limited to the UK market. As most company’s financial year ends on the 31st of December and therefore are busy preparing their annual report during the first few months of the year, the month of April appears very convenient for holding the conference (Livingston, 2010). In addition to that, most people according to Moneysupermarket (2012) holidays between June and August which also impacts the choice of the date of the event. Another advantage of holding the conference during April is that companies have the opportunity to implement the new technologies as the business year is in its early stages.
  6. 6. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 6 According to Krugman et al (2007) an important success factor is the selection of the speakers. They point out, that the chosen presenters need to understand the objectives of the conference and know its field rather than just entertain the attendees. The following paragraphs shortly introduce the chosen speakers and present the programme. -Felicity McCarthy Head of Small & Medium Business Marketing Communications at Facebook (McCarthy, 2014; Prysm BSU Limited, 2013). -Ray Nolan Director and Founder of Worky - An online networking profile for building an online presence and establishing a client list (Worky.com, 2014). -Julien Callede Founder and Chief Operating Officer of Made.com a London based furniture and design company that became very success as a direct result of marketing and selling their designs online (Clawson, 2014; Made.com, 2014). -Allen Moon Founder of On Deck Marketing and a writer for Entrepreneur.com encouraging business start-up's (Entrepreneur Media, 2014). -Matt Greenarce Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Cleethorpes Sweet Shop which imports American sweets to the UK. Matt developed his target market at a high street shop location and then realise he could grow his customer based and indeed operate his whole business online so he launched Sugar Rush since then his business has grown (Grimsby Telegraph, 2013).
  7. 7. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 7 All guest speakers can offer an insight into the online challenges faced by new and developed businesses on a daily basis. Moreover their personal experiences can add depth and knowledge to the topic surrounding successful online practices. Programme Title: Go Online Conference Location: Marriott Hotel, Westminster London Date: 25th of April 2014 Capacity: 160 People Programme Date Time Activity Room Speakers TBC 09:00 - 10:00 Registration Hall 10:00 - 10:45 Session 1 Room 1 Felicity McCarthy 10:45 - 11:00 Coffee break Exhibition Hall 11:00 - 11:45 Session 2 Room 2 Ray Nolan 11:45 - 12:00 Coffee Break Exhibition Hall 12:00 - 12:30 Session 3 Room 1 Matt Greenarce 12:30 - 13:45 Lunch Exhibition Hall 13:45 - 14:30 Session 4 Room 2 Julien Callde 14:30 - 14:45 Coffee break Exhibition Hall 14:45 - 15:30 Session 5 Room 1 Allen Moon 15:30 - 16:30 Panel Session Room 1 All Speakers 16:30 - 18:00 Networking Session Exhibition Hall Table 1: Programme of conference 2.2 Finance Plan According to Shone and Perry (2013) it is necessary within the event management process to control and plan an event’s finance. While doing so, it can be ensured that expenditure and income are monitored and therefore possible profit can be generated. Moreover they point out that it is of high importance to predict an events cost and revenues. As a result the following paragraph focuses on creating a budget for the planned conference according to Shone and Perry (2013: 145-146) and Van der Wagen and White (2010: 399-403) as illustrated on table 1 below.
  8. 8. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 8 Number of attendees 80 120 160 Income Tickets (£ 299 per ticket) 23’920 35’880 47’840 Exhibitors (max. 6 stands per £ 800) 3’200 3’200 3’200 Sponsors 18’000 18’000 18’000 Total income 45’120 57’080 69’040 Variable costs Delegate Rate £ 90 per Person 7’200 10’800 14’400 Fixed costs Venue hire (2nd room) 800 800 800 Venue hire (3rd room, breakout) 600 600 600 Speakers (Average £ 500 per Speaker, (Bailyn, 2012)) 2’500 2’500 2’500 Marketing 10’000 10’000 10’000 Communication 5’000 5’000 5’000 Office related costs 3’000 3’000 3’000 Staff 10’000 10’000 10’000 Insurance 5’000 5’000 5’000 Bank charges and interests 500 500 500 Unforeseeable (about 10% of fixed costs) 5’000 5’000 5’000 Total costs 49’600 53’200 56’800 Profit or loss 4’480 3’880 12’240 Table 2: Profit and loss account, figures in £ As it can be seen from the figures above, they have been constructed with a certain safety margin. The ticket prices can be considered as relatively economical if equated to a similar conference about online Marketing, which costs about £500 (Eventbrite, 2014). The exhibition stands are sold for a lower price compared to standard exhibition stand prices (Expositionists, 2014), and it is assumed that only 60% are being sold in order to keep the budget realistic. The income from sponsorship is being discussed later within this document.
  9. 9. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 9 All the costs regarding venue and delegate rates are based on email information with Marriott Hotel which can be found within the appendix 1. The remaining costs are evaluated on a realistic basis keeping a certain safety margin in mind. As it can be seen the conference is likely to gain profit, if the budget can be monitored accordingly. The following paragraph focuses on defining the break-even point. 2.2.1 Break-even point Shone and Parry (2013) quote that it is important to identify at which stage the event makes profit and reaches its break-even point. Therefore the figure 1 below displays the break-even point of the planned conference according to Shone and Parry (2013: 146). Figure 1: Break-even point chart As it can be seen from the figures the income of the conference displays a steady growth and reaches the break-even point at a fairly early stage. The calculated break-even point according to the budget defined previously is at 102 tickets ((£42,400 fixed costs – £21,200 sponsors and exhibition stands) / (£299 ticket price – 90 delegate rate)). Therefore the conference starts to achieve profit after 63.75% of the tickets are sold. 0 10000 20000 30000 40000 50000 60000 70000 80000 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Income/costsin£ Break-even Chart Fixed costs Total costs Income Number of attendees
  10. 10. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 10 2.2.2 Cash flow Weetman (2006) states that the cash flow statement is especially important for a company’s liquidity, which is the main factor of measuring an organisation’s solvency. The table below displays the cash flow for the planned conference according to Weetman (2006: 407). Cash inflow February March April Tickets (20/50/30% of 120) 7’176 17’940 10’764 Exhibitors (50/30/20%) 1’600 960 640 Sponsorship (50/30/20%) 9’000 5’400 3’600 Total cash inflow 17’776 24’300 15’004 Cash outflow Venue room 1 prepayments 2’500 2’500 Venue room 1 final payment (based on 120 delegates) 5’800 Venue room 2 prepayments 200 200 Venue room 2 final payment 400 Venue room 3 prepayments 150 150 Venue room 3 final payment 300 Speakers (0/50/50%) 1’250 1’250 Marketing (20/50/30%) 2’000 5’000 3’000 Communication (20/50/30%) 1’000 2’500 1’500 Office related costs (33.33/33.3/33.33%) 1’000 1’000 1’000 Staff (20/40/40%) 2’000 4’000 4’000 Insurance (50/50/0%) 2’500 2’500 Bank charges and interests (33.33/33.3/33.33%) 166.67 166.67 166.67 Total cash outflow 11’516.67 19’266.67 17’416.67 Total cash in- or outflow 6’259.33 5’033.33 2’412.67 Cash on account 6’259.33 11’292.66 8’879.99 Table 3: Cash flow statement, figures in £
  11. 11. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 11 As it can clearly be seen within the cash flow statement, the conference gains the needed liquidity to pay its liabilities for every month. The cash outflow in April is not affecting the company at any time since cash on account is available during that time and therefore solvency ensured. It has to be pointed out that the cash flow calculation is based on the budget above and therefore assumes ticket sales of 75% which is reasonable. Furthermore the unforeseeable costs are not included at that point since cash does not actual outflow at that stage. Considering these facts it can be seen that the budget and the cash flow are congruent. To sum the finance plan up it can be pointed out that the conference is a solid investment with high potential to achieve profit. Solvency is given at any time and potential investors do not have to expect high risk involvement. 2.3 Marketing Plan According to Silk (2006) a marketing strategy or plan of action involves two major activities. These activities are crucial to the success of any business event and will be utilised when marketing to potential audiences. The two activities are directly related to targeting, segmentation and positioning, which are key factors that any marketer must consider. He points out that the idea behind marketing is to grab people’s attention and generate a talking point online and offline by word of mouth as well as word of mouse. The first activity is related to the selection of a target market and how an organisation can position its goods or services as a top of the mind brand in the eyes of its consumers. In the case of this business conference the target market is selected based on the theme; showing the importance of engagement in online activity and developing an online presence. The established target market enhances the view of online activity and revenue for start-up and developed small and medium businesses. By targeting the ‘baby boomers’ who are currently working in or who own those companies, stated by Owran (1996), it will allow them to generate additional knowledge of new ways business possibilities. When it comes to start-up companies the
  12. 12. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 12 reason for targeting this group is to highlight how the level of their marketing expenses and revenue can be significantly different but in a positive way. This conference will highlight how easy it is to become known by potential customers and competitors by simply forming an online presence at a low cost. Essentially the conference will help generate business for attendees. The second activity is related to the specifics of the plan and identifying a position in the market for the event. The approach that will be used to market this event will be direct. The marketing strategy undertaken is to allow the guest speakers and content of the exhibitors and their stands to sell themselves. As mentioned by McDonald (2008) the use of a marketing plan that is cleverly prepared to not only match the company’s capabilities with what customers may need but also distinguish themselves for their competitors. This use of competitive advantage with the event’s content and valuel showcases to the customers what the conference offers as well as highlighting what competing conferences do not offer. By using both online and offline communication tools the event concept and message is directly delivered to our target audience. Offline communication mediums are posters, banners and leaflets at the pre event stage. Furthermore before the event the marketing team designs and produces the name badges that are worn by the attendees along with program for the day. This program features the schedule of the conference, information on the guest speakers as well as advertisements by the sponsors of the event. These sponsors act as a source of revenue for the event and in return gain access to the event's attendees, receive advertising space in the program and feature on all event promotional material. The sponsorship packages available are ‘Diamond, Platinum, and Gold Sponsors’ ranging from £3,000 to £9,000, which can be found in the appendix 2. The offline communication with all participants continues during and after the event as the event material will be visible around the venue and a physical thank you letter will be sent to all attendees and supporters with information about following conferences.
  13. 13. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 13 With regard to online communication tools they are essential for marketing the conference particularly as the theme of this event is focused on online activity. The marketing engages with the target market at all event stages. The mediums used are: ∙ Website. ∙ Social media such as Facebook and Twitter. ∙ Eventbrite (which supports online advertising and ticket sales). The mediums above ensure an active online presence throughout all event stages in order to attract, satisfy and engage potential customers, exhibitors, sponsors and speakers to engage with the conference. The point can be made that throughout the research process a smaller target group within the target market was recognised. This proportion of the target market are businesses that have a lack of knowledge of online mediums and have failed to create an online presence and develop their companies. The speakers on the conference and the chosen exhibitors are able highlight how imperative it is for businesses to engage in online activities and give attendees the tools and confidence to do successfully. In order to convey a clear, understandable and identifiable message for the attendees, it is essential to provide consistent marketing plan. The after sales service is a crucial element to the marketing of this event and forms a positive reputation. As mentioned before, the level of communication must be carried throughout all stages but in particular during the post event phase as this has the potential to lead to customer retention and generate a loyal customer base for future events. As mentioned by Canfield et al (2011: 114) “One well implemented idea can significantly accelerate your awareness and success”.
  14. 14. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 14 3. Work Breakdown Structure Project Management Institute (1996 54) states that: “A work breakdown structure is a deliverable-oriented grouping of project elements that organizes and defines the total scope of the project…” In other words it is a decomposed process of a project, broken into activities, work packages, tasks and sub-tasks, which can be easily identified and managed (O’Toole & Mikolaitis, 2002). With this in mind the work breakdown structure for this project is divided into three phases, the pre-event, the event day and the post-event. In addition each phase is separated into different departments and its activities. As a result a constant level of work flow can be ensured. The detailed conference’s work breakdown structure can be found in the appendix 3. 4. Resourcing According to O’Toole (2011) the resourcing consists of a list of all the resources needed within the project. Furthermore it is based on the work breakdown structure’s departments and activities in order to easily identify the related and essential resources. The detailed resourcing table can be found the appendix 4. 5. Critical Path Analysis Critical path analysis allows scheduling of a project’s activities and is a particularly effective tool within events management (Project Management Institute, 2013). By employing this technique event planners can save time, assess the importance and progress of certain tasks and decide on the most suitable course of action (Woolf, 2012). Initially tasks defined within the work break down process are ordered into sequential steps and their individual time frame determined. Analysis is then employed to calculate the overall project duration, highlight the most efficient route to culmination and allow event organisers to plan effective
  15. 15. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 15 starts of individual elements of the project and the event overall (Project Management Institute, 2013). The critical path analysis identifies the crucial activities and paths, which can delay the project. This path is established by calculating the total float of each activity. The float of each activity is the amount of time to which each action can be extended without delaying the project. The total float is calculated by the late finish minus the early finish of each activity. The late finish and early finish results and the critical patch are identified in the critical path diagram in appendix 5 (Project Control Academy, 2012). The calculation of the total float of each activity is displayed in the table 4 below. TF1 = 0 TF7 = 0 TF13 = 0 TF2 = 0 TF8 = 0 TF14 = 48 TF3 = 0 TF9 = 0 TF15 = 0 TF4 = 0 TF10 = 0 TF16 = 0 TF5 = 6 TF11 = 13 Caption: TF = Total float Number = number of activity TF6 = 0 TF12 = 13 Table 4: Total float of activities 6. Health and Safety Risk Management According to The Event Management Body of Knowledge (2006) risk management is one of the key factors in planning an event. Risk is defined as the consequence and/or likelihood of an event not fulfilling its objectives. Risk management is the process of identifying these problems, assessing them and formulating a strategy to manage them (Bowdin et al., 2012). Types of risk can be defined as human, natural or political and all need to be considered when planning an event (Berg, 2010). Silvers (2008) quotes that as a consequence of health and safety laws it is important that the events’ team is aware of the potential risks and the steps taken to mitigate these. Additionally she points out that a thorough risk management process needs to take into account the needs of the stakeholders and other aspects of the event strategic plan, for example it is
  16. 16. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 16 imperative that the marketing/PR manager knows the capacity of the event in order to not exceed ticket sales. According to HSE (1995) during the event it is important to keep an incident report log as this assists the planning of future events. Furthermore it is a legal requirement to use an accident report book. Bowdin et al. (2012) adds that holding a full and comprehensive limited liability insurance policy is vital in organising an event as this transfers a portion of the risk, particularly in relation to personal injury, financial loss and property damage. For the planning of this event a complete risk assessment has taken place. Risks have been identified, their likelihood and potential cost have been calculated and steps have been taken to manage these risks. A copy of the risk assessment with a contingency plan is included in the appendix 5 and 6. Word count: 2’747
  17. 17. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 17 7. References Bailyn, E. (2012) The Ultimate Guide To Keynote Speaker Fees. Available at: http://evanbailyn.com/keynotespeakers/the-ultimate-guide-to-keynote-speaker- fees/ (Accessed: 4 March 2014). Berg, H-P. (2010) 'Reliability: Theory & Applications.' Risk Management: Procedures, methods and experiences, (1), 79-95. Bladen, C., Kennell, J., Abson, E. & Wilde, N. (2012) Events Management: An introduction. Oxon: Routledge. Bowdin, G., Allen, J., O’Toole, W., Harris, R. and McDonnell, I. (2012). Events Management. 3rd edn. London: Routledge. Buhalis, D. & Costa, C. (2006) tourism business frontiers: consumers, products and industry. Burlington: Elsevier Ltd. Canfield, J., Hansen, M., V. and Hewitt, L. (2011) The Power of Focus. 10th edn. Florida: Health Communications Inc. Clawson, T. (2014) Made.com: Julien Callede, Ning Li and Chloe Macintosh - Startups.co.uk: Starting a business advice and business ideas. Available at: http://startups.co.uk/made-com-julien-callede-ning-li-and-chloe-macintosh/ (Accessed: 17 February 2014). EMBOK (2006). Event Management Body of Knowledge. Available at: http://embok.org/html/domains.htm (Accessed: 3 March 2014) Entrepreneur Media (2014) Allen Moon. Available at: http://www.entrepreneur.com/author/allen-moon (Accessed: 19 February 2014).
  18. 18. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 18 Eventbrite (2014) Online Marketing for Conferences and Events. Available at: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/online-marketing-for-conferences-and-events-tickets- 9657133747 (Accessed: 4 March 2014). Expositionists (2014) Guide prices. Available at: http://www.expositionists.co.uk/prices-of-exhibition-stands.html (Accessed: 4 March 2014). Financial Times Live (2014) Sponsors. Available at: https://www.ft-live.com/sponsors (Accessed: 6 March 2014) Goldblatt, J. (2005) Special Events: Event Leadership for a New World. 4th edn. Chichester: John Wiley and Sons. Grimsby Telegraph. (2013) Young entrepreneur's sweet success is now moving online. Available at: http://www.grimsbytelegraph.co.uk/Young-entrepreneur-s-sweet-success-moving- online/story-19847993-detail/story.html (Accessed: 4 March 2014). Gutwein, K. (2013) The Importance of Social Media for Business. Available at http://www.kbkcommunications.com/the-importance-of-social-media-for-business/ (Accessed 10 February 2014). Harding, M., 2013. Social media important tool for small business. Available at: http://thetimes-tribune.com/news/business/social-media-important-tool-for-small-business- 1.1582774 (Accessed: 10 February 2014). Health and Safety Executive (HSE) (1999). The Event Safety Guide. Norwich, HSE Books. Health and Safety Executive (HSE) (1995). Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations. Available at: http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/ (Accessed: 3 March 2014)
  19. 19. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 19 Krugman, C., CMP, CMM & Wright, R. R. (2007) Global Meetings and Exhibitions. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons Inc. Livingston, S. (2010) Why do most companies have a 31 December financial year end?. Available at: http://www.businessn2k.com/why-do-most-companies-have-31-december-financial-year- ends/ (Accessed: 17 February 2014). Made.com (2014) About made.com - a furniture revolution | made.com. Available at: http://www.made.com/about-us (Accessed: 17 February 2014). Mash Media Group (2013) London moves to 6th place in 2012 ICCA city rankings. Available at: http://www.conference-news.co.uk/news/2013/05/13/London-moves-to-6th-place-in-2012- ICCA-city-rankings/5690 (Accessed: 12 February 2014). McCarthy, F. (2014) Experienced Digital Marketer & Social Media Guru. Available at: http://ie.linkedin.com/in/felicitymccarthy (Accessed: 21 February 2014). McDonald, M. (2008) Marketing Planning: Understanding Marketing Plans. London: Kogan Page Limited. Moneysupermarket (2012) Travel Trends Tracker 2013. Available at: http://www.travelsupermarket.com/c/holidays/travel-trends-tracker/ (Accessed: 17 February 2014). O’Toole, W. (2011) Events Feasibility and Development: From Strategy to Operations. Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann. O’Toole, W. and Mikolaitis, P. (2002) Corporate Event: Project Management. New York: John Wiley and Sons.
  20. 20. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 20 Owran, D. (1996) Born at the Right Time: A History of the Baby Boom Generation. Canada: University of Toronto Press Incorporated. Project Control Academy (2012) Critical Path Method. Available at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SF53ZZsP4ik (Accessed: 6 March 2014) Project Management Institute (2013) A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge. 5th edn. Philadelphia: Project Management Institute Project Management Institute (1996) A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge. North Carolina: PMI Publishing Division Prysm BSU Limited (2013) Felicity McCarthy - The Business Show. Available at: http://www.greatbritishbusinessshow.co.uk/seminars/felicity-mccarthy/ (Accessed: 22 February 2014). Roychowdhury, A. (2008) Importance of Online Business. Available at: http://abirroychowdhury.articlealley.com/importance-of-online-business-496841.html (Accessed: 17 February 2014). Shone, A. & Parry, B. (2013) Successful Event Management: A Practical Handbook. 4th edn. Hampshire: Cengage Learning EMEA. Silk, A. (2006) What is Marketing?. Massachusetts: Harvard Business School Publishing Corporation. Silvers, J. (2008). Risk Management for Meetings and Events. Oxford: Butterworth- Heinemann. The Web Doctor (2014) ARTICLE: 10 Reasons Why companies should start doing business online. Available at: http://www.dbwebdoctor.com/article_why_companies_need_a_website.asp (Accessed: 12 February 2014). Van der Wagen, L. & White, L. (2010) Event management for tourism, cultural, business and sporting events. 4th edn. Frenchs Forest: Pearson Australia.
  21. 21. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 21 Weetman, P. (2006) Financial Accounting an Introduction. 4th edn. Essex: Pearson Education Limited. Woolf, M., B. (2012). CPM Mechanics: The Critical Path Method of Modeling Project Execution Strategy. Washington: ICS-Publications. Worky.com (2014) Ray Nolan - Software Entrepreneur - Malahide, Ireland. Available at: http://www.raynolan.com/ (Accessed: 17 February 2014). Yodle (2013) Survey: SMB Owners are “Happy” Despite Concerns about Healthcare, Retirement & Customer Acquisition. Available at: http://www.yodle.com/company/press-releases/yodle-smb-sentiment-survey/ (Accessed: 12 February 2014).
  22. 22. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 22 8. Appendix Appendix 1 Email between Livio Bergamin and Giannina Rageth from 15th of February 2014 Food & Beverages Tea, Coffee, Biscuits £6.00/p.p. Tea, Coffee, Pastries £9.00/p.p. Breakfast Buffet £15.00/p.p. (Cereals, Yoghurt, Fresh Cut Fruits, Sausages, Eggs, Bacon, Tomatoes, Mushrooms, Milk, Selection of Pastries & Muffins, Juice) Sandwich Lunch Buffet ca. £23.00/p.p. (1 Soup, 3 Salads, Meat/Fish & Veg Sandwiches, Miniature Dessert) DDR Lunch Buffet ca. £30.00/p.p. (3 Salads, 6 hot dishes, 3 desserts) Private Dining Menu Table Service £50.00/p.p. (1 Starter, 1 Main Course, 1 Dessert, Coffee and Petit Fours) Canapes 6 pieces per person £15.00/p.p. Arium Housewine Red or White £29.00 Water is usually complimentary/otherwise £4.50/per bottle Jug of orange juice £15.00/per jug Soft drinks from £3.75/per drink Room Hire Depends on the room and how long it is used for, approx. £600-800.00 AV Equipment 1 Screen, 1 Projector, 1 Flipchart, Speakers are usually complimentary in the room hire Flipchart £35.00 Pop up Fastfold screen £53.00 PA System 8ch £185.00 Radio Microphone £54.00 Held Radio Mic £54.00 Conference Phone £150.00 Phone calls UK Local & National £1.30/p.m., UK Mobile £3.55/p.m., Europe £3.55/p.m., USA £3.35/p.m. Public WIFI 24h complimentary Day Delegate Rate Day Delegate Rates between £85.00-95.00 following included:
  23. 23. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 23 - Room hire - 1 Screen, 1 Projector, 1 Flipchart, Speakers - 3 Coffee breaks: 1. Tea, Coffee and 3 Refreshments (Morning): i.e. Smoked Salmon and Scrambled Egg English Muffin, Compote of Fruit Dorset Muesli Bars 2. Only Tea & Coffee refreshed 3. Tea, Coffee and 3 Refreshments (Afternoon): Doughnuts with Chocolate Sauce and Sprinkles, Montgomery Cheddar and Tomato Straws, Fruits - DDR Lunch Buffet - Bottles of Still and Sparkling Water
  24. 24. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 24 Appendix 2 Sponsorship packages that are available are Diamond, Platinum, and Gold’ ranging from £3,000 to £9,000. The Diamond Package Valued at £9,000 entitles the sponsor to the following: Offline: ● Direct association with the business conference. ● Main logo on all event material including banners, posters, leaflets, badges and any correspondence that the attendees receive. ● Full two page spread in the event program as well as the main logo on the front and back of the program booklet. ● Exhibition space in the exhibition area of 10m². ● 10 event tickets. ● 15 minutes presentation opportunity during lunch break. Online: ● Main logo on all advertising through different mediums with link to its website (Twitter, Facebook, Website). ● Sponsor details on ‘Eventbrite’ which in itself is an event hub. ● Main logo on the invitations and thank you letters sent to attendees. Incentives: ● Brand exposure to a potential audience of 160 people (including exhibitors). ● Two sponsorship ambassadors are provided to ensure people are aware of the partnership. ● Onscreen advertising of 7 minutes around the venue during every the coffee break. ● Onscreen advertising of 35 minutes around the venue during lunch break ● Full access to the event’s attendee list. ● Exclusive right to sponsor for future events.
  25. 25. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 25 The Platinum Package Valued at £6,000 entitles the sponsor to the following: Offline: ● Direct association with the business conference ● Full one page spread in the event program ● Exhibition space in the exhibition area of 5m² ● Second logo on the invitation and thank you letters sent to attendees. ● 5 minutes presentation opportunity during lunch break. Online: ● Logo on all advertising through different mediums with link to its website (Twitter, Facebook, Website). Incentives: ● Brand exposure to a potential audience of 160 people (including exhibitors). ● One sponsorship ambassadors is provided to ensure people are aware of the partnership. ● Onscreen advertising of 5 minutes around the venue during every the coffee break. ● Onscreen advertising of 25 minutes around the venue during lunch break ● Exclusive right to sponsor for future events.
  26. 26. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 26 The Gold Package Valued at £3,000 entitles the sponsor to the following: Offline: ● Direct association with the business conference. ● Half page spread in the event program. Online: ● Logo on all advertising through different mediums with link to its website (Twitter, Facebook, Website). Incentives: ● Brand exposure to a potential audience of 160 people (including exhibitors). ● Onscreen advertising of 3 minutes around the venue during every the coffee break. ● Onscreen advertising of 15 minutes around the venue during lunch break. ● Exclusive right to sponsor for future events. The figure below shows a list of potential sponsors according to Financial Times Live (2014), which organises various conferences throughout the year in regard with online business.
  27. 27. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 27 Potential Return on Investment Potential attendees Potential customers due to word of mouth (factor 3) Total potential business partners Potential business (£ 500 per person) 160 people 480 people 640 people £ 320‘000 The table above shows the potential profit a sponsor can generate by being part of the conference. The figures are calculated on the basis of relatively low revenue per business of £ 500 and fair factor of positive effect of word of mouth. As it can be seen with very moderate calculation, the conference has good opportunities for sponsors.
  28. 28. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 28 Appendix 3 Pre-event WBS
  29. 29. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 29 Pre–Event Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 GoOnlineConference Concept Define concept Why Define reason for the conference What Define what does the event consists of When Define when the event takes place Where Define where the event takes place Who Define the stakeholders Venue Selection Research according to defined concept Visit possible venues Negotiation with venues Deciding and booking venue Inform other venues about the decision Equipment Request A/V material Define what and when is needed Request stage Define what and when is needed Request exhinbition space / room Define exhibition space(s) Define number of exhibitors Check restrictions for exhibitors F&B Chose and request one of the hotel's options Inform hotel about no. Of people (attendees + speakers + exhibitors + HR) Inform hotel about any food restrictions Decoration Confirm with hotel the standards decor for the conference Ask for banners from marketing department
  30. 30. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 30 Attendees Selection Research according to defined marketing plan Target chosen companies according to marketing plan Send invitations Registration Elaborate registration form Personal details + company details + Food restrictions + Disability issues Deal with registration process (build database) Comunicate with finance to control the payments Speakers Selection Research according to defined concept Invitation and booking Personal details + company details + Food restrictions + Disability issues Arrangements Provide transport information Provide conference information Exchange of speakings abstract, topic and presentation Exhibitors Selection Research according to defined concept Research interest at potential exhibitors Invitation and booking Personal details + company details + Food restrictions + Disability issues Arrangements Provide transport information Provide conference information Exchange detailed exhibition conception
  31. 31. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 31 Sponsorship Selection Research potential sponsors according defined concept Research interest in sponsorship at potential sponsors Define sponsorship budget Target sponsors with sponsorship proposal Negotiate and fix contracts Arrangements Provide transport information Provide conference information Exchange detailed sponsorship contents Marketing Marketing Plan Market analysis Identify target group Define marketing budget Research marketing activity Define marketing strategy Implementation of marketing plan Communication Define main messages Define communication tools Put communication into action Evaluate messages and tools Finance Venue Pre payment Control budget Speakers Pre payment Control budget
  32. 32. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 32 Exhibitors Control income Control budget Sponsors Control income Control budget Marketing Payments for activities Control budget Communication Payments for activities Control budget Resources Payments for resources Control budget Attendees Control registration and payments Budget Merge budget together Control total budget Control cashflow Account Control income Control outcome Match budget an real cash Control cashflow Programme Plan Define and elaborate agenda Coordinate agenda with speakers, exhibitors and sponsors Adjust agenda if needed Finalise agenda and forward to the other departments Attune final agenda printing version with communication department Estate Management Health & Safety Liase with Health and Safety Officer at Venue
  33. 33. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 33 Complete Risk Assessment Find required insurances by law and do them (for the venue, attendees, speakers, HR) Maintenance Access requirement for disabled guests Electricity - Power supply, plugs, PAT testing, Exhibitor requirements Liase with venue - contact list for emergencies Security Create plan for any cabling in line with H&S requirement Is external security required? If so organise Liase with venue - what to do in an emergency, fire procedures Cleaning Queue management. Are security searches required? Find out how often rooms are cleaned, bins emptied, etc. Liase with venue - what to do in the event of spills, toilet management, etc Personnel Selection Define needs Recruit Ask for: Personal details + Food restrictions + Disability details Define working tasks and who is responsible for each task
  34. 34. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 34 Send info about conference, tasks, working time, dress code and other info to selected human resources Elaborate briefings for conference day Event day WBS
  35. 35. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 35 Eventday Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 Level 5 GoOnlineConference Venue Rooms Registration hall Prepare desks, chairs, accreditation material previously defined Conference rooms Check if it is all set up according to plan Exhibition room Check if it is all set up according to plan Storage and Breakout room Check if it is all set up according to plan Equipment Check and control A/V Check with hotel if A/V resources are all set up Check contengency resources in case of emergency Report to the hotel's responsible person if something is missing or not working Check Stage Check if it is all set up according to plan F&B Check with hotel if everything is ready Coffee breaks, lunch, refreshments Decoration Room decoration: Hotel standards + Banners Check with hotel if everything is ready Set up banners Remove all banners in the end Personnel Reception Greet and brief employers and volunteers Coordination Give directions and orders about working tasks and activities Final instructions Debrief and thank the employers and volunteers Exhibitors Reception Accreditation
  36. 36. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 36 Direct to exhibition room Stands set up Coordinate Provide exhibitors requirements Final instructions Thank exhibitors and get feedback Speakers Reception Accreditation Provide agenda books / flyers Provide badges Provide carrier bag Confirm presentation time to each speaker Coordinate Deal with defined arrangements for presentation Call and present respective speaker before presentation Final instructions Thank speakers and get feeback Attendees Welcome Accreditation Provide agenda booklets / flyers Provide badges Provide carrier bag Coordinate Coordinate delegates' flow within the venue according to activities Deal with delegates' requirements and needs Marketing Communication Set up all the advertising-related material Control online communication Promote the sponsors and exhibitors and thank the volunteers help during the conference Finance Attendees Control payments of new delegates Emergency Resources Pay and collect receipts Programme Control Adjust programme if necessary according to activities flow
  37. 37. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 37 Estate Management Health and Safety Follow defined procedures of the venue, Follow risk assessment plan if necessary, Activate insurance if necessary Brief all the human resources about health and safety procedures Maintenance Security Cleaning
  38. 38. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 38 Post-event WBS
  39. 39. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 39 Post–Event Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4 GoOnlineConference Venue Closure Check all the closing down procedures Give and get feedback Marketing Communication and Evaluation Give feedback to stakeholders (attendees, speakers, exhibitors, sponsors, venue, human resources) Get feedback from stakeholders (attendees, speakers, exhibitors, sponsors, venue, human resources) Provide final balance information of event to stakeholders via e-mail, website and social media Finance Venue Complete payment Speakers Complete payment Personnel Complete payments Attendees Control registration and payments Account Final calculations Programme Evaluation Evaluate if agenda was followed as planed Estate Management Health & Safety Check all the closure procedures with venue Maintenance Security
  40. 40. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 40 Cleaning
  41. 41. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 41 Appendix 4 WBS Resources Quantity Phase Provider Pre Event day Post Venue Own Make Buy Sponsors Exhibitors Concept and Plan Office space 1 X X X IT equipment: 1- Computer 5 X X X X 2- Printer 2 X X X X 3- Mobile phones 5 X X X X Office material: 1- Pens 20 X X X X X 2- Notebook 5 X X X X X 3- Printing paper (x1000) 3 X X X X X Venue Rooms 1- Conference 2 X X 2- Storage and breakout 1 X X 3- Exhibition room 1 X X A/V (resources and service) 1 X X Stage 1 X X Tables (Registration) 4 X X Chairs (Registration) 4 X X F&B (resources and service) 1- Coffee Break 3 X X 2- Lunch 1 X X 3- Refreshments 3 X X Decoration 1- Room decoration 1 X X 2- Banners 5 X X X Marketing (includes attendees, speakers, Same resources as concept Agenda booklets 200 X X X X
  42. 42. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 42 exhibitors) Badges 200 X X X X Conference flyers 500 X X X X Exhibition stands 4 X X X X Carrier bags 200 X X X X Banners 10 X X X X X Finance Same resources as concept Safe (for money) 1 X X X Personnel Steering comittee 1- Conference coordinator 1 X X 2- Registration coordinator 1 X X 3- Venue coordinator 1 X X 4- Personnel coordinator 1 X X 5- Finance coordinator 1 X X Volunteers 8 X X Speakers 5 X X Estate Management (Health and Safety, Maintenance, Security and Cleaning) Venue's resources TBC by venue X X X
  43. 43. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 43 Appendix 5 Critial Path Analysis
  44. 44. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 44 Appendix 6 EVENT ORGANISER RISK ASSESSMENT Date Assessed: 12/02/14 Assessor: Nicola Rowe Monitored by: Signature: Event: Social Media Conference Title: Go Online Conference Organisation: MA Events Management Venue: Marriott Hotel, Westminster London Inclusive Dates of Site Attendance: 25/04/2014 Activity Who is affected Risk Evaluation Control Hazard Identified Person(s) at Risk Worst Case Outcome (A) Probability Rating (B) Risk Level (AxB) Control Measures Over-crowding of event hall Public and exhibitors HIGH – Certain to cause death 4 Probability 4  The floor plan has been designed to maximise aisle widths to avoid overcrowding.  Suitable space around the stands & feature areas, which will be monitored, by the event organiers  Organisers to schedule arrivals inline with venue capacities, and monitor arrivals with help from the venue, to help prevent overcrowding. MEDIUM – Probable to cause serious injury 3 Possibility 3
  45. 45. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 45 LOW – Possible to cause first aid injury 2 Unlikely 2 6  Appropriate staffing to be put in place by organisers to manage the flow of visitors through the venue, all staff to be visibly identifiable  Organisers to monitor the exhibition area.  Exhibitors to notify organisers should their stand, or the immediate locality of their stand, become overcrowded  All to obey instructions given by the organiser, venue staff or sub- contractor used to help control traffic and pedestrian flows VERY LOW – Unlikely to cause injury / damage 1 Remotely 1 Hazard Identified Person(s) at Risk Worst Case Outcome (A) Probability Rating (B) Risk Level (AxB) Control Measures Fire Exhibitors, Speakers, Contractors, Visitors, Venue Staff, Event Organiser Staff HIGH – Certain to cause death 4 Probability 4  Fire exits to be kept clear of obstructions  Fire extinguishers to be available within the venue  Ensure all waste is collected and stored correctly  Exhibitors to ensure all waste and flammable waste material is removed  Exhibitors, speakers, visitors and staff to use designated smoking areas MEDIUM – Probable to cause serious injury 3 Possibility 3 LOW – Possible to cause first aid injury 2 Unlikely 2 8 VERY LOW – Unlikely to cause injury / damage 1 Remotely 1 Hazard Identified Person(s) at Risk Worst Case Outcome (A) Probability Rating (B) Risk Level (AxB) Control Measures Illness or Injury Exhibitors, Speakers, Contractors, Visitors, Venue Staff, Event Organiser Staff HIGH – Certain to cause death 4 Probability 4  A member of the venue event staff to be contacted if in need of First Aid. A member of event staff and/or security staff to be positioned in the venue at all times  Ensure that First Aid facility is known to exhibitors, speakers, event staff and helpers, and is featured on the floor plan  Organisers to ensure First Aid post is staffed by qualified persons  Room temperature to be monitored throughout the event to maintain appropriate levels MEDIUM – Probable to cause serious injury 3 Possibility 3 LOW – Possible to cause first aid injury 2 Unlikely 2 6 VERY LOW – Unlikely to cause injury / damage 1 Remotely 1
  46. 46. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 46 Hazard Identified Person(s) at Risk Worst Case Outcome (A) Probability Rating (B) Risk Level (AxB) Control Measures Evacuation Exhibitors, Speakers, Contractors, Visitors, Venue Staff, Event Organiser Staff HIGH – Certain to cause death 4 Probability 4  Venue to ensure fire prevention detection and alarm systems are adequate for the venue, and have been checked and maintained in efficient working order  Organisers and venue to ensure that the current number of exits from the venue are adequate  Floor plan submitted to venue in advance of the event for approval  Evacuation plan to be known by event organisers and communicated to exhibitors, speakers and contractors  Organisers to provide contractors, exhibitors, speakers and visitors with relevant evacuation procedure documentation, including fire assembly point  Exhibitors and speakers should ensure they are aware of the nearest emergency exit and keep all exits clear of obstructions at all times  Contractors, exhibitors, speakers and visitors to ensure they are aware of evacuation procedures, read all relevant documentation provided, and follow all instructions given if needed to evacuate  Ensure that all gangways and emergency exits are kept clear  All Emergency exits maintained and kept clear for the duration of the event  Exhibitors should not block aisles or public areas, including during build up and breakdown periods, and ensure that stand displays are kept within the allocated stand space  If any evacuation announcements cannot be heard over the atmospheric noise then security/events staff are to go into the halls to evacuate people MEDIUM – Probable to cause serious injury 3 Possibility 3 LOW – Possible to cause first aid injury 2 Unlikely 2 6 VERY LOW – Unlikely to cause injury / damage 1 Remotely 1 Hazard Identified Person(s) at Risk Worst Case Outcome (A) Probability Rating (B) Risk Level (AxB) Control Measures Slips/trips and falls Exhibitors, Speakers, Contractors, HIGH – Certain to cause death 4 Probability 4  Exhibitors should ensure that all boxes are appropriately stacked within the allocated stand space  Exhibitors should request that all empty, flat packed, and broken boxes are removed from their stand by the event staff  Organisers and exhibitors to ensure empty boxes are cleared from stand, with assistance from student helpers. MEDIUM – Probable to cause serious injury 3 Possibility 3
  47. 47. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 47 Visitors, Venue Staff, Event Organiser Staff LOW – Possible to cause first aid injury 2 Unlikely 2 4  Organisers and exhibitors to ensure no trailing cables within stand area, or in adjoining pedestrian walkways  Organisers and exhibitors to ensure personal belongings are stored away appropriately  Organisers and exhibitors to ensure all other waste is stored and removed safely VERY LOW – Unlikely to cause injury / damage 1 Remotely 1
  48. 48. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 48 Activity Who is affected Risk Evaluation Control Hazard Identified Person(s) at Risk Worst Case Outcome (A) Probability Rating (B) Risk Level (AxB) Control Measures Stands falling over Public & exhibitors HIGH – Certain to cause death 4 Probability 4  All exhibitors to ensure that their stands are safe and secure, and report any problems to the organiser MEDIUM – Probable to cause serious injury 3 Possibility 3 LOW – Possible to cause first aid injury 2 Unlikely 2 4 VERY LOW – Unlikely to cause injury / damage 1 Remotely 1 Hazard Identified Person(s) at Risk Worst Case Outcome (A) Probability Rating (B) Risk Level (AxB) Control Measures Catering facilities Exhibitors, Speakers, Contractors, Visitors, Venue HIGH – Certain to cause death 4 Probability 4  All Catering facilities and staffing provided by venue, and therefore at the control of venue  Reputable and known concessions units only  Hygiene regulations to be followed rigidly  Catering company to employ suitable and trained staff Catering staff to ensure all spills are cleaned immediately MEDIUM – Probable to cause serious injury 3 Possibility 3 LOW – Possible to cause first aid injury 2 Unlikely 2 4
  49. 49. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 49 Staff, Event Organiser Staff VERY LOW – Unlikely to cause injury / damage 1 Remotely 1 Hazard Identified Person(s) at Risk Worst Case Outcome (A) Probability Rating (B) Risk Level (AxB) Control Measures Variety of contractors and exhibitors on site Contractors and exhibitors HIGH – Certain to cause death 4 Probability 4  Exhibitors to agree to a Risk Assessment as part of their booking, and supply additional information where appropriate  Experienced, reliable and approved contractors used only  Event Organiser to be informed of any particular hazards arising prior to, and during the convention  Basic checks made on contractor and exhibitor Risk Assessments  Exhibitors are responsible to ensure that their contractors use appropriate equipment and are competent to do so  Each contracting firm must have a qualified First Aider on their staff covering crew staying late. The contractor must also supply the name of the person in charge and a contact number MEDIUM – Probable to cause serious injury 3 Possibility 3 LOW – Possible to cause first aid injury 2 Unlikely 2 4
  50. 50. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 50 VERY LOW – Unlikely to cause injury / damage 1 Remotely 1 Activity Who is affected Risk Evaluation Control Hazard Identified Person(s) at Risk Worst Case Outcome (A) Probability Rating (B) Risk Level (AxB) Control Measures Electricity: connections, & power to stands etc Exhibitors HIGH – Certain to cause death 4 Probability 4  Exhibitors to only use electrical supplies/sockets that have been supplied by the event organisers, or those that have been supplied by subcontractors appointed by the organiser,  The Organiser’s appointed contractor will install power supplies on all stands, where needed. Exhibitors are not allowed to do their own wiring due to potential sub-standard and dangerous installations being energised  Exhibitors to ensure equipment is used safely and for the purpose for which it was designed MEDIUM – Probable to cause serious injury 3 Possibility 3
  51. 51. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 51 LOW – Possible to cause first aid injury 2 Unlikely 2 6  Exhibitors should ensure that no sockets or connections are overloaded within their stand area, and if in doubt should seek approval from the event organiser  All electronic portable appliances brought to site by exhibitors should bear a valid PAT Test certificate  Ensure all electrical risks are controlled, and a member of staff from the electrical contractor is onsite at all times  All orders for electricity must be placed before the deadline, where applicable VERY LOW – Unlikely to cause injury / damage 1 Remotely 1 Hazard Identified Person(s) at Risk Worst Case Outcome (A) Probability Rating (B) Risk Level (AxB) Control Measures Build-up and Breakdown Exhibitors, Contractors, Venue and Event Staff HIGH – Certain to cause death 4 Probability 4  At least 2 hours set up period for exhibitors, and full day access for contractors  Only authorised persons are permitted in the venue for buildup and breakdown. Children under 18 are not allowed on site for the entire duration of build up and break down  All to be aware of the potential hazards of contractors moving around site, including the use of forklift trucks and delivery vehicles  Wristbands to be worn by exhibitors to allow them with access before the event opens to the publicAll contractors to be monitored on-site, with regard to the tasks undertaken, and suitable equipment to be worn when necessary  MEDIUM – Probable to cause serious injury 3 Possibility 3 9 LOW – Possible to cause first aid injury 2 Unlikely 2 VERY LOW – Unlikely to cause injury / damage 1 Remotely 1 Hazard Identified Person(s) at Risk Worst Case Outcome (A) Probability Rating (B) Risk Level (AxB) Control Measures Car parking during show Exhibitors and speakers HIGH – Certain to cause death 4 Probability 4  Parking arrangements for exhibitors and speakers and loading bay information to be communicated in advance  Venue contact details to be made available in advance, along with parking permits if applicable  Visitor parking to be discouraged MEDIUM – Probable to cause serious injury 3 Possibility 3 LOW – Possible to cause first aid injury 2 Unlikely 2
  52. 52. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 52 VERY LOW – Unlikely to cause injury / damage 1 Remotely 1 2 Hazard Identified Person(s) at Risk Worst Case Outcome (A) Probability Rating (B) Risk Level (AxB) Control Measures Manual Handling Exhibitors and event helpers HIGH – Certain to cause death 4 Probability 4  Exhibitors to ensure that all stand staff are trained in the correct Manual Handling procedures  Manual handling document to be provided in exhibitor and student helper packs  All to wear appropriate footwear  Liquid spills to be monitored by cleaners and cleared up. Any wet floors to be marked with hazard signs immediately MEDIUM – Probable to cause serious injury 3 Possibility 3 LOW – Possible to cause first aid injury 2 Unlikely 2 6 VERY LOW – Unlikely to cause injury / damage 1 Remotely Hazard Identified Person(s) at Risk Worst Case Outcome (A) Probability Rating (B) Risk Level (AxB) Control Measures Visitor orientation Exhibitors, Speakers, Contractors, Visitors, Venue Staff, Organiser HIGH – Certain to cause death 4 Probability 4  Visitors to access venue through front main entrance during event  All relevant information will be put in the conference guide including the position of the First Aid Point, refreshment and rest areas, security post, etc.  Use the floor plan to highlight key areas of interest to aid movement around the venue, such as exhibitor stand locations, First Aid, Organisers Office, Seminar/lecture rooms, Refreshments areas  All stands are advised to have access for the disabled, via the exhibitor manual and stand inspection MEDIUM – Probable to cause serious injury 3 Possibility 3 6
  53. 53. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 53 Staff and Helpers LOW – Possible to cause first aid injury 2 Unlikely 2  Organisers and stewards to monitor disabled guests for ease of movement around the venue  Organisers to ensure there is disabled access/egress to the Venue  Organisers to ensure appropriate staffing are in place to provide a managed and safe environment for exhibitors, speakers,staff and visitors  Security marshals in place to monitor flows of traffic and pedestrians within the venue VERY LOW – Unlikely to cause injury / damage 1 Remotely 1 Hazard Identified Person(s) at Risk Worst Case Outcome (A) Probability Rating (B) Risk Level (AxB) Control Measures Seminar Rooms Visitors and speakers HIGH – Certain to cause death 4 Probability 4  All Emergency Exits are to have illuminated Emergency Exit signs above the door  All cables must be securely fastened away to avoid trip hazards  Noise levels must be kept to a reasonable level  Seating runs must be clipped together or benches used MEDIUM – Probable to cause serious injury 3 Possibility 3 LOW – Possible to cause first aid injury 2 Unlikely 2 VERY LOW – Unlikely to cause injury / damage 1 Remotely 1 1 Hazard Identified Person(s) at Risk Worst Case Outcome (A) Control Measures
  54. 54. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 54 Worst Case Outcome (A) Probability Rating (B) Risk Level (AxB) Alcohol/substance controls Exhibitors, Speakers, Contractors, Visitors, Venue Staff, Event Organiser Staff and Helpers HIGH – Certain to cause death 4 Probability 4  No Alcohol/substances permitted in venue. Venues with bar facilities are clearly notified of this before event  If anyone is found to be in possession of controlled drugs (Class A, B or C), or under the influence, the police will be notified Any offenders will be asked to leave the event MEDIUM –Possibly cause serious injury 2 Possibility 3 LOW – Possibly cause first aid injury 1 Unlikely 2 VERY LOW – Unlikely to cause injury / damage Remotely 1 1 Key to Risk Level: 1 - 2 = Low risk 3 – 4 = Low-Medium risk 6 – 9 = Medium-High risk 12 – 16 = High risk
  55. 55. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 55 EVENT CONTINGENCY PLAN FOR A SOCIAL MEDIA CONFERENCE 1. INTRODUCTION: Social Media Conference aimed at new start-up businesses and those hoping to move their business online. Exhibition stands and guest speakers. To be held within the events facilities of a London hotel. All delegates expected to be over 18 years of age. A one-day even Date: 25/04/2014 Start Time: 09:00 End Time: 18:00 Venue: Marriott Hotel Westminster London 2. COMMAND & CONTROL: a. Event Manager/Chief Organiser (person who has overall responsibility): (Include: Name, How to contact them during the event; where they will be located during the event) Livio Bergamin 07985 335566 or Pedro Beirão 07985 445566 Will be located within exhibition hall or speakers room during conference b. Safety Officer: (Include: Name, How to contact them during the Event; where located during the event) Nicola Rowe 07985 556677 Will be located within exhibition hall or speakers room during conference c. First Aid Co-ordinator: (Include: Name; How to contact them during the event; where they will be located during the event) Nicola Rowe 07985 556677 Will be located within exhibition hall or speakers room during conference d. Police (if present at the event) (include: how to contact them during the event; where they will be located during the event) Police presence not required, as this will not be a ‘high risk’ event. In the event of an emergency the police are to be contacted via the hotel reception
  56. 56. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 56 who will also inform the venue manager 3. RESPONSIBILITYOFINDIVIDUALAGENCIES/GROUPS List the responsibilities and numbers of personnel in a simple ‘bullet point’ format. All responsibilities must be DISCUSSED and AGREED with each individual/agency/group prior to the event. Events Management Team  Public safety – ensure ticket sales do not exceed capacity  Ensure a full risk assessment is carried out  Understand and convey to others evacuation and fire procedure  Liaise with hotel staff in the event of an emergency  Act as a source of information for exhibitors and speakers  Arrange for St John’s Ambulance support  Liaise with police/emergency services if necessary  Maintain records of delegates, exhibitors and speakers  Manage conference support staff  Provide venue with floor plans for the exhibition area and any AV requirements  Ensure that any catering requirements including special requests are passed on to the venue  Ensure that the venue staff are aware of any attendees with accessibility issues Conference Support Staff  Check tickets  Traffic control  Act as a source of information for the public  Follow evacuation/fire procedures as directed by event organisers Venue Staff  Ensure all exits are clear and emergency procedures are clearly displayed  Provide Events Management Team with copies of any insurance policies  Brief venue staff  In the event of an emergency contact and liaise with emergency services  Ensure that water is supplied  Provide rest room facilities  Provide on the day contact details to the Events Management Team  Ensure that adequate ventilation and heating are maintained  Brief the catering team and ensure special requests are adhered to.  Arrange for cleaners to empty bins, clear rubbish and watch for spills throughout the event.  Ensure access to the exhibition hall for exhibitors during the set up phase  Liaise with the Events Management Team regarding any set up requirements and deliveries.
  57. 57. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 57 Exhibitors  Maintain a safe area  Clear away any rubbish  Provide contact details to Events Management Team  Advise Events Management Team of stand layout and requirements prior to the event. 4. ALLOCATION OF RESOURCES List any equipment to be used for public safety during the event or in the event of an incident e.g. Hand held radios, fire extinguishers etc.  Fire extinguishers to be provided by the venue and their location made known to the Events Management Team  Events Management Team to contact each other via radio (hands-free ear-piece)  Events Management team to use load speaker if necessary within the exhibition hall or speakers’ microphone within designated talks  Events Management Team First Aider to ensure First Aid kit is stocked and stored within the Events Management Team control room. 5. COMMUNICATIONS How the event control/organisers will communicate with the event staff/marshals and vice/versa  Event management staff to communicate via hands-free two-way radio. Venue staff to contact events management staff via mobile telephone or in person (and vice versa). Event management staff to communicate with support workers in person or by mobile telephone. How the event control/organisers will communicate with the public  Depending on the situation either in person or via load speaker/microphone. The venue does not have a PA system Include a list of persons who will have radios and what channel they can be contacted on  Livio Bergamin (Chief Organiser) 1  Pedro Beirão (Logistics Manager) 2  Sam Hopkins (Marketing and PR Manager) 3  Nicola Rowe (Risk and First Aid Manager) 4 Include a list of persons who at the event location will have access to a phone and their contact telephone numbers.  Livio Bergamin 07985 335566  Pedro Beirão 07985 445566  Sam Hopkins 07985 667788  Nicola Rowe 07985 556677
  58. 58. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 58 6. EVENT SIGNAGE (to the event and a round the event site) Who is providing and erecting the signage at the event. When will it be in position  The Events Management Team will provide signage and work with the venue to ensure signs are erected at the best positions two hours before the event is due to start 7. LOST/FOUND PERSONS What steps will be taken for re-uniting people who get separated?  Lost people should be directed/taken to the venue reception. Hotel reception staff are then to contact one of the Events Management Team using the mobile telephone numbers provided. A team member will then meet with the person, assess the situation and if necessary liaise with other events staff using radio to reunite the person with their party. 8. LOST/FOUNDPROPERTY Where is lost property to be taken to? If it is not reclaimed, what will happen to it?  Lost property should be reported to one of the Events Management Team who will log the item in the lost property book within the control room  Found property should be reported to one of the Events Management Team who will log the item in the found property book within the control room. The item will stay within the control room until it’s owner comes forward  Items of found property can only be handed over once suitable checks (e.g. description of item) have been carried out.  Any items that remain found and not collected should be held at the Events Management Team Office until the owner comes forward. The venue staff must be made aware of this procedure and advise the public who to contact should an inquiry be made.  Full contact details of anyone missing property should be taken so that they can be contacted after the event if the item is found. 9. EVACUATIONPLAN Describe the actions to be taken if the event location had to be partially or fully evacuated. Consider: Who will make the decision to evacuate the public from the event location?  Venue management staff with reference to event organisers Livio Bergamin and Pedro Beirão Who will co-ordinate the evacuation?  Event organisers Livio Bergamin, Pedro Beirão, Sam Hopkins and Nicola Rowe with assistance from conference support staff and venue staff.
  59. 59. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 59 How will the event staff/marshals be informed and briefed of the situation?  All staff to be aware of emergency procedures prior to the event. Event Management staff to liaise via two-way radio and to pass instructions in person to support staff. Do the event staff/marshals have specific tasks in the event of an evacuation?  Events Management Staff to ensure a register of speakers, exhibitors and support staff is maintained and that this is checked once evacuation has been completed.  Information regarding delegates should be collated and checked if deemed necessary by the emergency services. Which exits will the public be directed to?  Venue to advise where the nearest exits are located prior to the event Where will the public be evacuated to?  Venue management staff to advise whether a front or back exit should be used Who will inform the emergency services?  Venue management staff Who will direct the emergency services when they arrive at the event location?  Venue management staff 12. TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT PLAN Consider car park locations: Entry & Exits; Routes to the car parks and any signage; speed limits on the event site; any shuttle services between car parks and the event site. Note: Ensure the emergency services have unhindered access into the event location.  Car parking facilities will not be provided for the general public. As a Central London venue has been selected the public will be encouraged to travel via public transport.  Events Management staff and support works will arrive by public transport  Exhibitors may use the front entrance to unload and collect conference materials, e.g. pop-up stands, brochures etc. Parking will then be provided by the venue, but only if the make, model, colour and registration number of the vehicle have been provided in advance. 11. FIRST AID SERVICES Who is providing the First Aid cover; where is the first aid located; is it accessible to ambulances; consider communications links to the event control/organisers. Note: All public events must have the appropriate first aid arrangements in place  In the first circumstances contact Nicola Rowe of the Events Management Team 07985 556677
  60. 60. Group Event Project Plan MA Events Management 60  A first aid box will be held in the Events Management Team Control Room  If the situation is more serious the assistance of the St John’s ambulance support will be called upon. This person will be located within the control room  Should an ambulance be required this will be arranged by Nicola Rowe through the venue reception  The front entrance to the hotel is accessible for emergency services staff. 12. MEDIA If there was an incident at the event that attracted media interest, consider who would speak to the media and where would this take place?  Any requests should be referred to Marketing and PR coordinator Sam Hopkins, 07985 667788  Any meetings with the Media should first be cleared with the venue manager. 13. CROWD BEHAVIOUR/SAFETY Consideration should be given to crowd issues during evacuation, should this be necessary. The following can assist in determining the type of behaviour the crowd attending might adopt in an emergency situation: a. research the type of visitor that is likely to attend b. collate and assess information about Health and Safety  Ticket sales are not to exceed the venue capacity limits.  Events Management and support staff to maintain crowd control during busy times, e.g. registration, the beginning of talks, refreshment breaks.  In the event of an emergency events management staff along with venue management staff are to ensure the building is evacuated safely.  Registration lists to be taken to ensure that all delegates are accounted for.

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