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Creative industries in arts & culture practice

Creative Industries as Cultural Arts Practice
By : Prof. Penn T. Larena ,CPS,MPA
Bachelor of Arts and Culture Education

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Creative industries in arts & culture practice

  1. 1. C R E AT I V E I N D U S T R I E S I N A R T S & C U LT U R E P R A C T I C E J O S E F I N O T U L A B I N G L A R E N A J R . , C P S , M P A
  2. 2. L E A R N I N G O U T C O M E S • apply theories of creative production and cultural value to analyse texts across a variety of media • critically evaluate writing and publishing projects in terms of their feasibility, sustainability and cultural and societal outcomes • develop and deliver creative industries projects and events while working independently and collaboratively • determine a range of partnership opportunities and funding sources for creative industries projects and events • interpret and critically evaluate contemporary policy for the creative arts and industries • combine skills in creative development, project management and marketing and apply them to deliver writing and publishing projects
  3. 3. W H AT I S C R E AT I V E I N D U S T R I E S • The creative industries refers to a range of economic activities which are concerned with the generation or exploitation of knowledge and information
  4. 4. B A G U I O A S U N E S C O C R E AT I V E C I T Y: R E V I TA L I Z I N G C U LT U R E A N D C R E AT I V I T Y F O R S U S TA I N A B L E U R B A N D E V E L O P M E N T • Launched in 2004, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Creative Cities Network (UCCN) aims to make creativity an essential driver for sustainable urban renewal and development. • On October 31, 2017, Baguio City, the first City in the Philippines to be designated City of Crafts and Folk Art, joins the 180 member cities from 72 countries.
  5. 5. G L O B A L A L L I A N C E F O R C U LT U R A L D I V E R S I T Y • UNESCO. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation works through its Global Alliance for Cultural Diversity and Creative Cities Network to strengthen cultural industries internationally by encouraging knowledge-sharing, capacity building, good practice and mentoring between its members. The Global Alliance promotes cultural diversity by strengthening the capacity of cultural industries to produce and distribute goods and services and help them gain access to national and international markets
  6. 6. I N V E S T I N F I L I P I N O C R E AT I V I T Y T O P R O M O T E C U LT U R E , H E L P B O O S T E C O N O M Y • The National Commission on Culture and Arts is currently developing two cultural hubs in the country, particularly the Maestranza, in Intramuros, Manila and another one in Bohol. These creative hubs will help in developing the country’s pool of creative talents and create opportunities for them. • On the local level, local government units currently have a dedicated budget on culture through the Department and Budget Management’s Local Budget Memorandum no. 78, s. 2019 and that will allow Local Culture and Arts Councils in LGUs to be established in the next three years. • The creative economy comprises music, performing arts, including dance and theatre, handicrafts, architecture, visual arts, graphic arts, cartoon animation, literature, fashion, furniture and interior design, film, digital inventions including computer games, television production, publishing, and advertising.
  7. 7. I N T E G R A T E D I N D U S T R Y D E V E L O P M E N T F O R C R E A T I V E I N D U S T R I E S • This program is prepared and crafted to provide a strategic direction for the development of the Philippine Creative Industries, which will lead to improved competitiveness, enhanced capability, increased productivity, export promotion and development, and compliance to global standards for greater market access. Components of creative Industries covered in this project include live entertainment and performing arts; audio visual sector specifically film; animation; game development; marketing services; creative process outsourcing; and creative freelancers.
  8. 8. I T I S A L I G N E D W I T H T H E P H I L I P P I N E S ’ N E W I N D U S T R I A L S T R A T E G Y • i3s: Inclusive Innovation Industrial Strategy aimed to • (1) build innovation and entrepreneurship ecosystem – upgrade and develop new industries; • (2) remove obstacles to growth; and • (3) strengthen domestic supply chains & deepen participation in global/regional value chains.
  9. 9. T H E S C O P E O F T H E D E V E L O P M E N T O F T H E P H I L I P P I N E C R E A T I V E I N D U S T R I E S P R O J E C T I S C O M P O S E D O F F I V E ( 5 ) S U B - P R O J E C T S A I M E D T O D E V E L O P V A R I O U S C R E A T I V E S E C T O R S : 1.Development of Creative Industry Roadmap 2.Filipino Performers and Entertainers Accelerator – Capacity Building Program for the Workers in Film, Live Events and Performing Arts 3.Development of Shared Digital Services Facility 4.Development of Creative Services Special Zone 5.Professionalize Filipino Online Creative Freelancers
  10. 10. C R E A T I V E I N D U S T R I E S I N T H E P H I L I P P I N E S • The Philippine semiconductors and electronics industry is the largest contributor to the country’s manufacturing sector. In 2013, the industry accounted for 41% of total exports, brought in US$ 918 million-worth of foreign and domestic investments, and employed 2.2 million workers. The potential for the industry remains high, as member firms intend to move to higher value-added manufacturing to meet global demand. These companies plan to improve current production capacities, to expand current research and development and design capabilities, and to further develop the labor force over the next several years. The industry is working to drive up the semiconductor and electronics manufacturing index of the country by identifying customers’ needs, understand suppliers’ baseline, develop relevant capabilities, match industry supply and demand, and conduct periodic assessment of its performance. In addition, the industry recommends that the government continue with its scholarship program for operators and technicians, improving the country’s business environment, conducting R&D capability development, and aggressively promoting local industries and SMEs through investment missions abroad.
  11. 11. F U T U R E F O R T H E C R E AT I V E I N D U S T R I E S • The Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) is pushing for promotion of the economic potential of the country’s creative industries in Southeast Asia to boost exports in services, as the Philippines aims to be the leading creative economy in the region in the next decade. • DTI Secretary Ramon Lopez said industry players have mapped out a creative economy roadmap that intends to provide necessary support to creative services, including promotion budget. • Lopez said the country has stronger creative services, particularly graphic design, game development, and software development which have been identified as “service winners”.
  12. 12. G A W A D S A M A N L I L I K H A N G B AYA N • In April 1992, the Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan or the National Living Treasures Award was institutionalized through Republic Act No. 7355. Tasked with the administration and implementation of the Award is the National Commission for Culture and the Arts, the highest policy-making and coordinating body for culture and the arts of the State. The NCCA, through the Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan Executive Council, conducts the search for the finest traditional artists of the land, adopts a program that will ensure the transfer of their skills to others, and undertakes measures to promote a genuine appreciation of and instill pride among our people about the genius of the Manlilikha ng Bayan.
  13. 13. H I S T O R Y • The National Living Treasures Award (Gawad sa Manlilikha ng Bayan) was institutionalized in 1992 through Republic Act No. 7355. The National Commission for Culture and the Arts, which is the highest policy-making and coordinating body of the Philippines for culture and the arts, was tasked with the implementation and awarding. This is in line with UNESCO's criteria of Living National Treasures.
  14. 14. G A W A D S A M A N L I L I K H A N G B A Y A N G U I D E L I N E S • To become a Manlilikha ng Bayan, an individual or group candidate must: 1. Possess a mastery of tools and materials needed for the traditional, folk art and be a maker of works of extraordinary technical quality; 2. Have consistently produced works of superior quality over significant period; 3. Have engaged in a traditional and folk art which has been in existence and documented for at least fifty (50) years; 4. Command respect and inspire admiration of the country with his character and integrity; 5. Must have transferred and/or willing to transfer to other members of the community the skills in the traditional and folk arts for which the community has become nationally known. 6. However, a candidate who, due to age or infirmity, has left him/her/them incapable of teaching further his/her/their craft, may still be recognized provided that he/she/they must possess the qualifications as enumerated above.
  15. 15. W H AT I S T H E F U T U R E O F O U R C R E AT I V E I N D U S T R I E S
  16. 16. T H A N K Y O U

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Creative Industries as Cultural Arts Practice By : Prof. Penn T. Larena ,CPS,MPA Bachelor of Arts and Culture Education

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