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Movement and Sustainability

G.E. -Contemporary World

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Movement and Sustainability

  1. 1. Movement and Sustainability Josefino T. Larena Jr, CPS, MPA
  2. 2. Learning Outcomes  Discuss the relationship between population and economic welfare  Identify the effects of aging and overpopulation  Differentiate between contrasting positions over reproductive health  Identify the reasons for the migration of people  Explain why states regulate migration  Discuss the effects of global migration on the economic well being of states
  3. 3. Global Demography  Global Demographic Trends and Patterns. The global population, which stood at just over 2 billion in 1950, is 6.5 billion today. The world is currently gaining new inhabitants at a rate of 76 million people a year (representing the difference, in 2005, between 134 million births and 58 million deaths).
  4. 4. Global Agricultural population  Global Agricultural population has declined .In 2011,it accounted for over 37 percent of the total world population,compared to the statistics in 1980 in which rural and urban population percentages were more or less the same.
  5. 5. Global agriculture towards 2050  The challenge Agriculture in the 21st century faces multiple challenges: it has to produce more food and fibre to feed a growing population with a smaller rural labour force, more feedstocks for a potentially huge bioenergy market, contribute to overall development in the many agriculture-dependent developing countries, adopt more efficient and sustainable production methods and adapt to climate change
  6. 6. Food demand and production  World population is expected to grow by over a third, or 2.3 billion people, between 2009 and 2050. This is a much slower rate of growth than the one seen in the past four decades during which it grew by 3.3 billion people, or more than 90 percent. Nearly all of this growth is forecast to take place in the developing countries. Among the latter group, sub-Saharan Africa’s population would grow the fastest (+114 percent) and East and Southeast Asia’s the slowest (+13 percent). Urbanization is foreseen to continue at an accelerating pace with urban areas to account for 70 percent of world population in 2050 (up from 49 percent at present) and rural population, after peaking sometime in the next decade, actually declining.
  7. 7. The Perils of Overpopulation  Human overpopulation is among the most pressing environmental issues, silently aggravating the forces behind global warming, environmental pollution, habitat loss, the sixth mass extinction, intensive farming practices and the consumption of finite natural resources, such as fresh water, arable land and fossil fuels
  8. 8. It’s the Economy ,Not the Babies!  A baby boom is generally considered to be a sustained increase and then decrease in the birth rate. The United States, the UK and other industrialized economies have experienced only one such baby boom since 1900 – the one that occurred after World War II.  In addition, many currently developing economies such as India, Pakistan and Thailand have experienced a baby boom since 1950 as a result of a sustained decline in infant and child mortality rates as a result of improved medicine and sanitation.
  9. 9. Demographic vs Economic Imperatives  First, we should be clear about the two main justifications for migration:  a) long term demographic challenges – insufficient babies and ageing population  b) short term economic growth – to address labour shortage issues  TFR is all about long term demographic challenges and we should not conflate this with short term economic growth.
  10. 10. Women and Reproductive Rights  This also includes the right to be safe and satisfying sex life. This recognizes that no woman should be subjected to forced pregnancy, forced sterilization or forced abortion. This includes, among other things, freedom from discrimination because of one's sexuality and reproductive life choices.
  11. 11. Women Rights
  12. 12. The Feminist Perspective  The feminist perspective of gender stratification more recently takes into account intersectionality, a feminist sociological theory first highlighted by feminist-sociologist Kimberlé Crenshaw.
  13. 13. The Feminist Perspective  Intersectionality suggests that various biological, social and cultural categories, including gender, race, class and ethnicity, interact and contribute towards systematic social inequality. Therefore, various forms of oppression, such as racism or sexism, do not act independently of one another; instead these forms of oppression are interrelated, forming a system of oppression that reflects the “intersection” of multiple forms of discrimination. In light of this theory, the oppression and marginalization of women is thus shaped not only by gender but by other factors such as race and class
  14. 14. Gender Equality
  15. 15. Population Growth and Food Security
  16. 16. Food security a key issue for ASEAN This photo taken on 27 June, 2018 shows two Hmong tribe children posing at a coffee plantation in Houaphan province, northern Lao. (Aidan Jones / AFP Photo)
  17. 17. Urban Agriculture Project
  18. 18. Urban Agriculture Project n the city
  19. 19. Thank you

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G.E. -Contemporary World

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