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Educational Social Responsibility: A Theory & Practice

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An attempt has been made to define the key word Educational Social Responsibility (ESR) and determine its parameters. The practice of ESR by ISM, Ranchi and its role in social development has been examined. The parameters that may determine the broad spectrum activities of ESR are the job oriented skill development programme of short duration for the weaker sections of the society without any financial burden on the part of the beneficiaries, providing quality education to the students, correct response of the educational institutions to their stakeholders, community development activities, fee waiver scheme and providing educational assistance to the students belonging to less privileged sections of the society. The post employment survey of 100 craft course beneficiaries reveals that ISM Ranchi has atleast started the process of social transformation through improving the quality of life and attracted youths from the backward sections for being a part of the mainstream society and helping in social development through ESR activities.

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Educational Social Responsibility: A Theory & Practice

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  2. 2. Siddhant Vol. 11, Issue 3, July - September 201 1, pp. 258-264 IndianJournals. com Educational Social Responsibility: A Theory and Practice 3 L. N. Bhagat* ii ABSTRACT An attempt has been made to define the key word Educat ional Social Responsibility (ESR) and determine its parameters. 4 The practice of ESR by ISM, Ranchi and its role in soc ial development has been examined. The parameters that may determine the broad spectrum activities of ESR are the job oriented skill development programme of short duration for the weaker sections of the society without any finai icial burden on the part of the beneficiaries, providing quality education to the students, correct response of the educational institutions to their stakeholders, community 1 development activities, fee waiver scheme and provi ding educational assistance to the students belonging to less V privileged sections of the society. The post employment survey of 100 craft course beneficiaries reveals that ISM J Ranchi has atleast started the process of social transformation through improving the quality of life and attracted ‘ youths from the backward sections for being a part of the mainstream society and helping in social development through ESR activities. KEYWORDS: Educational Social Responsibility, Social Develo pment, Quality of Life, Social Transformation, Mainstream Society INTRODUCTION l Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is a globally accepted term. The corporates, being a profit earning organisation, are directly involved in community development and other related activities by spending a excellence for social responsibility towards the part of their profits as a return to the society and community, students and guardians. The theme of “Social contributing positively towards sustainable development Responsibility of B-Schools” was discussed. at the AIMS_ (Ahluwalia, 2011). In fact, a true sustainable way of life Eastern Region Round Table organised by the Institute requires a combined effort in three broad areas, namely, of Science and Management (ISM), Ranchi on 27. economic growth with equity, conserving natural March, 2011. The matter was discussed at great length resources & environment and social development. Since by the Deans and Directors of the B-Schools and society is the central point around which all economic unanimously resolved for coining a keyword Educational and non-economic activities revolve, any attempt in social Social Responsibility (ESR) representing the social development, which the B-Schools can do in a better responsibility activities of the educational institutions. way, may lead to sustainable development in the real sense of the term. The B-Schools cari play an important role in igniting the society for its gradual transformation through various voluntary activities, of course, inspired by ethical *Director, Institute of Science and Management, Ranchi, Jharkhand, India, lnbhagat@yahoo. com. 258
  3. 3. .. ,.. ... ... ... .,. .._«y: —,«n_-_-«_, ... ._ 4. . ._ L. N. Bhagat OBJECTIVES The main objective of this paper is to define the word ESR and identify the broad spectrum activities that may Conducting Job Oriented Skill Development Programme: Besides the primary duty of conducting core courses for the people belonging to the higher strata of the society the educational institutions may also offer be considered within the purview of the term Educational job Oriented Skin development programme of 3 Short Social Responsibility. An attempt has also been made to examine the practice of Educational Social Responsibility by an educational institution of Iharkhand- ISM, Ranchi, practicing it for the last five years. ESR-ITS DEFINITION AND PARAMETERS Definition of ESR: The concept of ESR has recently emerged as a keyword in March 2010. This is the reason why no definition for this word is available. We have made an attempt to define it in terms of the voluntary efforts of the B-Schools towards social development without involving any cost to the beneficiaries. In broader connotation, ‘Educational Social Resporzribzlzkjz llr f/ re Voluntary eyjforls of t/ re Educaz‘1'omzl / nst1'2‘utz'o/ z.r, of course, inspired by 1/16 el/ zical excellence to words social developmerzt t/ trough vorz'ou. s' cacti": /z't1'e. r for imp/ ‘0V1'/7g the quality of/ zfe wil/ zouz‘ involving any cost to the people at large. ” Paramaters of ESR: Various social responsibility activities of the educational institutions that may come within the purview of the term ‘Educational Social Responsibility’ are discussed below. Providing Excellent Education: The core responsibility of a management school is to provide excellent education to their students. The quality of educational institutions is judged by the quality of courses offered to the students. It is the high level quality that helps in competing with the other fellow institutions in the race of first rate business schools. Then by extending quality education to the students the educational institutions can help the students in getting job in reputed business houses with moral busting for inclusive growth and help in achieving the goal of social development. (www. ismranchi. org, Report on AIMS Eastern Region Round Table Rao). Vol. ll, Issue 3, July — September 2011 duration for weaker sections of the society viz. ST, SC, OBC, Minorities and Physically Handicapped without causing any financial burden on the part of / the beneficiaries, (www. ismranchi. org- Report on AIMS Eastern Region Round Table — Bhagat). Such programmes may be formulated and implemented with the help of the Central/ State Government under public - private partnership scheme because the true educational institutions cannot afford such mega social development programmes which are non- profit making organisations. By doing such activities at the cost of others the educational institutions through their honest efforts may , help the society in its gradual transformation for a better and secured future. In fact saving is the most important item for national building. The unemployed youth cannot save, but as soon as they get employment after short training they might save something and contribute towards national building. Further, the opportunity to get free training and obtaining a secured and prestigious job might help and motivate the beneficiaries, that is, unemployed youth from the weaker sections to return to the main stream and save the society from dangerous implications which the society might have experienced in the absence of such activities. Any Tuition Fee Waiver Scheme for primary courses offered, initiated by the educational institutions, to a maximum extent of 5% of strength for the benefit of the students belonging to families of Below Poverty Line (BPL) categories, identified by the respective Governments, for their socioeconomic upliftment. This may be treated supernurnerary to the sanctioned strength (www. ismranchi. org 4 Report on AIMS Eastern Region Round Table— Bhagat). Such initiatives of educational institutions may provide an opportunity to the poor students for entering into the professional courses and getting all benefits after placement in appropriate companies similiar to the students of the well off families 259
  4. 4. Educational Social Responsibility: A Theory and Practice in the society. This may pave the way for social justice and help in attaining the goal of social development. Community Development Activities conducted by the educational institutions (www. aims. ac. in, AIMS Annual Convention — 2011). These activities may include the following: ' 0 Enhancement of Educational Standards of underprivileged groups 0 Adult Education activities 0 Providing employability skills and self employment opportunities 0 Activities relating to environmental awareness & ecological conservation - Initiating activities for health awareness, healthcare and sanitation - Adoption of village for holistic development of the villagers While conducting the community development activities the emphasis may be given to motivation, persuasion and demonstration. Necessary arrangements may be made for these facilities with the help of Government or any other sources. In fact, illiteracy, ill-health, malnutrition and improper sanitation are the root cause of poverty. By adopting such community development activities, the educational institutions may be able to play a positive role in eradicating both rural and urban poverty and help the society in achieving the long—term goal of sustainable social development. Providing Educational Assistance to the students belonging to less privileged sections of the society viz. financial assistance, scholarship etc. (www. aims. ac. in— AIMS Announcement for AIMS Award). Correct Response of the Educational Institutions to their stakeholders namely, 0 Responsibility towards students- make them global corporate citizens, 0 Responsibility towards faculties & institutions- co- creation of knowledge, 0 Responsibility towards corporate/ industry-sensitise corporate and industry towards social responsibility o Responsibility towards society, nation, world- contribute to gross national happiness (www. ismranchi. org-Report on AIMS Regional Round Table—Salunkhe). ESR vs CSR The concept of Educational Social Responsibility (ESR) can be best explained if it is compared with the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). The features of ESR & CSR are presented below. items 1 Types oforganisations involve ESR Not for profit organisations CSR Profit making organisations Volume of monetary resources employed No money, only service Huge money Sources of Funding Mainly other sources viz. Govt. , Corporates, etc Own Source Area of operations Mainly within campus Mainly outside the Corporate compound Ethics involved Ethical Service- Quality Education/ Quality of life Ethical Business- Quality Products 260
  5. 5. E-E3L2.¢; ,,. __<, -.; ;__. ., ,. L. N. Bhagat THE PRACTICE OF ESR BY ISM, RANCHI The Institute of Science and Management (ISM) has experienced the introduction of craft courses related to hotel management besides its core courses. Craft courses are designed to generate skill in any of the four trades of hotel management namely, food production, food & beverage service, front office and housekeeping. In fact the chairman of ISM society had submitted a proposal before the Iharkhand Government for sponsoring a one- year skill development certificate course for the unemployed youth of Jharkhand belonging to the ST/ SCI BC/ Minority communities under public - private partnership scheme in the year 2004. The Govemment accepted it with full financial support for the year 2005- 06 and the scheme continued till 2009-10. Altogether 749 candidates have completed their certificate course (499 sponsored by Welfare Department and 250 by Jharkhand State Schedule Caste Cooperative Development Council) and all have been placed in reputed hotels all over the country. DATA AND METHODOLOGY selection of 100 sample beneficiaries based on proportionate simple random sampling method for detailed investigation is presented below in Table 1. Above table explains the way of selecting 100 sample beneficiaries. A well structured schedule prepared for this purpose has been used for collecting necessary information. The information was collected during the , period from 15 April, 2011 to 15 August, 2011. Data collected includes the name of the hotels where he/ she works, place of work, designation, marital status, number of family members, total eamings (Salary plus perks), total savings, amount of savings spent in family care — household expenses (purchasing quality food, clothing and medicine) and education to siblings. The information related to the generation of awareness among the members of the society about balanced food, health care (encompassing inter—alia nutrition and sanitation) and technical education (three items) as well as the preference for the modern amenities like water filter, water cooler, freezer, TV, transistor, computer, mobile and home theatre (eight items) have also been collected, quantified, classified and tabulated for statistical analysis. The community-wise number of beneficiaries (employed RESULTS AND DISCUSSION after completing craft course of ISM, Ranchi) and The results are presented below from Table—2— Table-5. Table 1: Community-wise distribution of total beneficiaries and samplebenefrciaries Communities Total No. of Percentage Sample Beneficiaries Scheduled Tribe L 144 L beneficiaries Distribution 19% Jr 19 Scheduled Caste 310 ii 41% 41 7 Backward Class 134 18% 18 p Minorities J 151 22% ' 22 Total 749 100% 100 , _ _J Vol. 1 1, Issue 3, July - September 2011 i 261
  6. 6. MM Educational Social Responsibility: A Theory and Practice Table 2: Community-wise Average Earning of the Sample Beneficiaries Communities Scheduled Tribe Average Monthly Earning (Rs. ) 9731.25 Scheduled Caste 8538.19 Backward Class 11452.38 Minority 12707.14 Total Table 2 shows that the average monthly earning of the sample beneficiaries is Rs. l0, 131.89/-. The average monthly earning is highest in the case of beneficiaries belonging to the Minority community (Rs. 12707.14) 10131.89 __I followed by Backward Class (Rs. 11452.38), Scheduled Tribe (Rs. 9731.25) and Schedules Caste (Rs 8538.19). The trade-wise average earnings have also. been computed and presented below in Table 3. Table 3: Percentage Distribution of Trade by Communities and Trade-wise Average Earning of the Sample Beneficiaries Table 3 indicates that the trade which fetches the highest average monthly earning is food & beverage service (Rs. 12265.91). This trade also appears to be the most preferred trade by the sample beneficiaries belonging to all the communities except the Scheduled Caste. The Scheduled Caste beneficiaries have shown indifferent attitude towards each of the four trades. This Siddhant Percentage Distribution of Trades by Communities Scheduled Backward Scheduled Tribe Minority Caste Class Food Production 22.22 14.29 21.43 11063.42 Food & Beverage _ 43.75 25.00 52.38 42.86 12265.91 Service FrontOffice 18.75 25.00 28.57 9004.76 ‘'’°-‘’“ “’°-““ Average Earning (Rs. ) 100.00 100.00 10131.89 is indicated by the fact that there is very small variation in the percentage distribution of the trades by Scheduled Caste beneficiaries —— the range being 22.22 — 27.78%. The details are presents in Table 3. The magnitude of saving and the proportion of saving spent on family care and other items have been computed and presented in Table 4. 262
  7. 7. L. N. Bhagat Table 4: Percentage of Earning Saved and Percentage Distribution of Savings Spent on Family Care (Household Expenses and Education of Siblings) by the Sample Beneficiaries Percentage of Communities Earning Saved Percentage of Saving Spent on Family Care I ‘Household Expenses 7 Education of Siblings Total Scheduled Tribe 69.77 09.57 7934 l Scheduled Caste 53.48 32.27 Backward Class 47.49 09.52 Table 4 shows very high saving by the sample beneficiaries. The average saving is 54.47% of the total earning. This may be owing to the fooding, lodging and clothing facilities generally offered by the hotel to their employees. The percentage of earning saved is highest for Backward Class (65.49%) followed by Scheduled Caste (52.72%), Minorities (48.85%) and Scheduled Tribe (46.95%). This result is quite consistent to their socio-economic and cultural attitudes. The non—tribals particularly the Backward caste people are highly commercial in their attitude whereas Tribal are very much reluctant in saving their earning (Bhagat, I989). The very high percentage of saving spent on family care (71.49) is quite interesting. The expense on family care includes household expenses in quality food, clothing and medicine for the family members (53.58%) and education of the siblings (17.91%) and that has resulted in improved quality of life. The highest percentage of saving spent 4 Vol. ll, Issue 3, July — September 2011 on family care is for Schedule Caste community. The attitude towards family care by the beneficiaries (employed youth) belonging to the weaker sections of the society might indicate their ethical excellence and commitment to inclusive growth through social change. The examination of the magnitude of availing modem amenities and the extend of awareness among the members of the society by the sample beneficiaries are considered important. Altogether eight items of modern amenities and three items of generating awareness were‘ considered and the scores allotted to each individual beneficiary giving equal importance to each item. Despite knowing the limitation of using such a crude method it was preferred for simplicity and also to avoid the difficulties in collecting the prices of the items of modern amenities purchased by the respondents. The detailed results are presented below in Table 5. 263
  8. 8. Educational Social Responsibility: A Theory and Practice ~ Table 5: Community-wise average score of availing modern amenities and generating awareness among the members of Table 5 clearly indicates that the average score of availing modern amenities for the sample beneficiaries the society by the sample beneficiaries Average Score of availing Average Score of generatig Communities modern amenities (Total 08 awareness among the members of points) * the society (Total 03 points)” Scheduled Tribe Scheduled Caste Backward Class Minority * One point a! //otledfor eac/1 q/1‘/1e ezgfir items ofmodem amenifles are waler/1‘/ re); water cooler, ’ fi'z‘zl'ge, TX traimlrtor; computer, mobile and / zame t/ zeatre ** Onepa/ nt allotted far eac/1 of t/ ze I/ zree item generating awareness among the members of the society» are balanced food, ’ nealt/ zcare and rec/ mica! education management and placed in reputed hotels all over India. . Th 1 f 100 l b f ' ' is very small (2.64 in eight point scale) but the average e post cmp Oyment Survey 0 samp e we Manes score for generating awareness among the members of the society for balanced food, healthcarc and technical education is very high (2.26 in three point scale) for generating awareness among the members of the society. This may be taken to indicate their indifferent attitude towards availing modem amenities but strong attitude towards generating awareness among the people in the society and contributing positively towards social change. CONCLUSION reveals that the average monthly earning is not very high but their saving is quite appreciable. More than two- third of the savings are spent on family care V purchase of quality food, clothing & medicine for the family members and educating the siblings. This has a direct positive impact on the quality of their life. The sample beneficiaries are indifferent towards availing modern amenities but seem to have a strong attitude towards generating awareness for balanced food, healthcare and technical education among the members of the society. ISM Ranchi has taken the lead in starting the social Thus ISM’ Ranchi has atleast initiated the process of responsibility activities by introducing short-term skill 3120121 trair. lSfor. rnat1(; .n byfilmpmvmg 11:6 qraéugl ofllfilff development programme (Craft Courses) for the weaker ‘fie 611: 10‘1)ari]e(s o dcra eoursgs, 211) e etyofuths sections of the society. Altogether 749 unemployed om t 6 ac war Secuons or emg 3’ par 0 e matriculate youths have so far been trained in hotel mainstream Society and helping in Social development through ESR activities. REFERENCES Ahluwalia, J. S. (2011). Corporate Social Responsibility: An Issue Whose Time Has Come in C'. S'A’-Drz'ver of Social Inc/ u.s'I'0)1 Bhagat, L. N. (1989). Supply Response in Backward Agriculture - An Econometric Study of Cliotanagpur Region. First Edition. New Delhi: Concept Publishing Company http: //www. aims. org. in, Guidelines for AJMS Award- Dr. Dharrn' P. Sinha. Best Social Responsibility Award 2011. Last accessed on: 8"‘ July, 201l. http: //www. isrnranchi. org, Report on AIMS Eastern Region Round Table on Social Responsibility of B-Schools, March 27, 2011. Last accessed on: 8"‘ July, 2011. Siddliant 264 Suslaznabi/12y and }’ro/ its, edited by Ahluwalia, J . S. and Chaturvedi, P. First Edition. New Delhi: Institute of Directors: ‘ pp. l-12.

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