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A Crash Course in the Art of Stakeholdering - Patrick Bach, Chelsea Omel, & Markus Grupp

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Getting stakeholders to think in customer centric manner is relatively straightforward, yet often yields little in terms of actual change. This requires more than stakeholder support - it requires commitment, trust, and active participation in a process that can be unfamiliar or even frightening in a corporate environment. Workshops provide an opportunity to challenge the worldview of your stakeholders and expose them to the truths of customer behaviour. It’s an opportunity to transform them from supporters to believers by creating an environment where they can experience the magic of a user-centred collaborative process.

Published in: Design

A Crash Course in the Art of Stakeholdering - Patrick Bach, Chelsea Omel, & Markus Grupp

  1. 1. A little bit about us Markus Grupp Director,Digital Customer Experience atIndigo PatrickBach Senior Manager,Customer Experience Design atTD Chelsea Omel Manager,Service Design & Strategy atTELUS @markusgrupp @bachpat @thatseamstress
  2. 2. Design Thinking Design Doing
  3. 3. stakeholder play noun stake·hold·er ˈstāk-ˌhōl-dər
  4. 4. stakeholder play noun stake·hold·er ˈstāk-ˌhōl-dər 1 : a person entrusted with the stakes of bettors http://www.merriam-webster.com/
  5. 5. stakeholder play noun stake·hold·er ˈstāk-ˌhōl-dər 1 : a person entrusted with the stakes of bettors 2 : one that has a stake in an enterprise http://www.merriam-webster.com/
  6. 6. stakeholder play noun stake·hold·er ˈstāk-ˌhōl-dər 1 : a person entrusted with the stakes of bettors 2 : one that has a stake in an enterprise 3 : one who is involved in or affected by a course of action http://www.merriam-webster.com/
  7. 7. stakeholder play noun stake·hold·er ˈstāk-ˌhōl-dər 1 : a person entrusted with the stakes of bettors 2 : one that has a stake in an enterprise 3 : one who is involved in or affected by a course of action http://www.merriam-webster.com/
  8. 8. So what about stakeholdering? Five Burrowing Owls Athene cunicularia floridana, Florida, travelway
  9. 9. STEP 1: Know Your Actors
  10. 10. John in Marketing. VP of DIGITAL Product Manager Director of Technology Brian from Retail Managing Director ERIN in Customer Service Policy Advisor
  11. 11. Debbie Design Doubter
  12. 12. Debbie Design Doubter
  13. 13. BELIEFIN SERVICE DESIGN UNDERSTANDING LOW HIGH
  14. 14. BELIEFIN SERVICE DESIGN UNDERSTANDING LOW HIGH
  15. 15. BELIEFIN SERVICE DESIGN UNDERSTANDING LOW HIGH
  16. 16. BELIEFIN SERVICE DESIGN UNDERSTANDING LOW HIGH
  17. 17. BELIEFIN SERVICE DESIGN UNDERSTANDING LOW HIGH
  18. 18. Debbie Design Doubter
  19. 19. Why does influence matter? HIGH LOW MED ● A major obstaclefor your efforts ● Controls budget/ resources/ priorities ● Become a distractionin meetings ● Skepticism rubs offon stakeholders
  20. 20. Why does influence matter? HIGH LOW MED ● An advocate foryour work, potentially providingaccess to resources, fundingand priorities ● Drivetop-down change toward service designor design-led innovation ● A working level champion can bea usefulally to drivegrassroots initiatives
  21. 21. STEP 2: Write the Script
  22. 22. A rose by any other name...
  23. 23. Adopt the language of organization
  24. 24. What do you think of when I say “Research”?
  25. 25. Mental Models Your colleagues and stakeholders have mental models. These models are neither good nor bad.
  26. 26. Mental Models There is a risk of miscommunication when one person’s mental model is different than someone else’s, but they don’t realize it.
  27. 27. Mental Models: Sketching Activity
  28. 28. Sketching is not art. It’s about quickly conveying complex topics.
  29. 29. Mental Models: Sketching Activity You have 10 seconds to…. Sketch a house. Go.
  30. 30. Mental Models: Sketching Activity
  31. 31. Mental Models: Sketching Activity
  32. 32. Trigger Words: Activity Keeping in mind what we just learned about Mental Models. Discuss the words on your cue cards. What do they mean to you? Be specific. You are encouraged to sketch!
  33. 33. STEP 3: Set the Stage
  34. 34. BELIEFIN SERVICE DESIGN UNDERSTANDING LOW HIGH
  35. 35. workshop = showing + learning + working
  36. 36. BELIEFIN SERVICE DESIGN UNDERSTANDING LOW HIGH
  37. 37. BELIEFIN SERVICE DESIGN UNDERSTANDING LOW HIGH Workshopfor showing (performance) ● Simple activities ● No surprises ● High production value
  38. 38. BELIEFIN SERVICE DESIGN UNDERSTANDING LOW HIGH
  39. 39. BELIEFIN SERVICE DESIGN UNDERSTANDING LOW HIGH Workshop for Learning Workshop for Learning ● Case studies and templates ● Examples to work through together ● Coaching
  40. 40. BELIEFIN SERVICE DESIGN UNDERSTANDING LOW HIGH
  41. 41. BELIEFIN SERVICE DESIGN UNDERSTANDING LOW HIGH Workshop for working ● Clear objectives ● Advanced tools ● Less prep
  42. 42. Design Thinking Design Doing
  43. 43. Recap 1. Know your actors - take the time to understand your stakeholders, where they are coming from and what they need 2. Write the script - adopt the language of your organization and define concepts in a way that they will understand 3. Set the stage - adapt your activities to who is in the room
  44. 44. Credits All original drawings by Markus Grupp Wiredbrain by emilegraphics from the Noun Project workbench by RichardWearn from the Noun Project

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