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Health safety laws and regulations (laboratory)

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Health safety laws and regulations (laboratory)

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  2. 2. HEALTH SAFETY LAWS AND REGULATIONS (LABORATORY) Presented by: Saad Farooqi, C#01 Abdur Rahman, C#02 BS, 8th Semester 7/29/2018 3 DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL AND CONSERVATION SCIENCES UNIVERSITY OF SWAT
  3. 3. Contents  Introduction  Laboratory Hazards  Laboratory Safety  Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)  Fume hoods and other engineering controls  Safety Equipment 4
  4. 4. Introduction  Health: A state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.  Safety: The state of being safe; freedom from the occurrence or risk of injury, danger, or loss. 5
  5. 5. CONT,,  Laboratory:  A place, building or part of a building used for scientific and related work that may be hazardous.  The work conducted in a laboratory may include teaching or learning, research, clinical or diagnostic testing and analysis. 6
  6. 6. LABORATORY HAZARDS  Anything that may cause injury, harm or damage.  The laboratory environment can be a hazardous place to work  The hazards encountered in a laboratory are many and varied.  May result in short term or long term health effects if individuals are exposed to these hazards.  Many workers are unaware of the potential hazards in their work environment, which makes them more vulnerable to injury 7
  7. 7. CONT,,  Laboratory hazards may generally are  Biological - eg pathogenic microorganisms, animals, biological tissues, blood and other body fluids (human and animal)  Chemical - eg corrosive, flammable, toxic substances  Physical hazards – eg ergonomic hazards associated with manual material handling and equipment use, handling sharps  Electrical/Mechanical - eg high voltage apparatus, machinery with moving parts 8
  8. 8. Laboratory Safety  Laboratory safety rules and safe work practices or standard operating procedures (SOPs) should be established by Faculties, Schools and Disciplines to meet specific operational needs and to reduce the risks associated with laboratory hazards.  As a condition of entry to a laboratory, all individuals must complete a laboratory safety induction and receive specific training in local safety rules and laboratory procedures relating to their work (including relevant SOPs).  Individuals are required to comply with laboratory safety rules and procedures at all times whilst in the laboratory. Individuals who act contrary to the rules and procedures should be excluded from the laboratory. 9
  9. 9. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)  The department or laboratory shall provide PPE to each staff member.  The laboratory supervisor must determine the appropriate PPE needed for procedures in the lab by conducting.  Eye protection  Respiratory protection  Clothing  Hand protection  Chemical handling 10  Food and drink  Accidents and injuries  Heating substances  Sharps  Fume Hoods and Other Engineering Controls
  10. 10. Eye Protection  Eye injuries are horrifying, but preventable events.  Wisconsin law requires eye protection for all laboratory workers, so no one should work or be inside a laboratory without proper eye protection.  Be aware of the hazards of contact lenses. They are difficult to remove if your eyes must be washed in an emergency. 11
  11. 11. Respiratory Protection  The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has strict requirements for respirator (e.g., full-face mask or N-95 filter mask) use.  Always work in a well-ventilated area. 12
  12. 12. Clothing  Wear clothing that protects your skin.  Shoes should completely cover your feet.  Use a lab coat for further protection. The coat sleeves keep splashes, aerosols and dusts from touching your forearm and wrist.  Long hair, dangling jewelry, and loose or baggy clothing are a hazard in the laboratory. 13
  13. 13. Hand Protection 14  Vinyl and latex gloves should be a common sight in all laboratories.  They are inexpensive, comfortable and provide a nominal barrier to common hazards.  Check them for holes and change them frequently.  Be aware that vinyl and latex gloves offer no protection from many corrosives and organic solvents.
  14. 14. HANDLING CHEMICALS  All chemicals in the laboratory are to be considered dangerous.  Avoid handling chemicals with fingers. Always use a tweezer.  When making an observation, keep at least 1 foot away from the specimen.  Do not taste, or smell any chemicals.  Never return unused chemicals to their original container. 15
  15. 15. Food and Drink 16  Food and drink should not be stored or consumed in areas where chemical, biological or radioactive substances are being used or stored.  Laboratory refrigerators and cold rooms may not be used for the storage of foods.
  16. 16. ACCIDENTS AND INJURIES  Report any accident (spill, breakage, etc.) or injury (cut, burn, etc.) to the teacher immediately, no matter how trivial it seems. Do not panic.  If a chemical should splash in your eye(s) or on your skin, immediately flush with running water for at least 20 minutes. 17
  17. 17. HEATING SUBSTANCES 18  Take care that hair, clothing, and hands are a safe distance from the hot plate at all times.  Heated glassware remain very hot for a long time. They should be set aside in a designated place to cool, and picked up with caution.  Never look into a container that is being heated.  Do not place hot apparatus directly on the laboratory desk. Always use an insulated pad.  Allow plenty of time for hot apparatus to cool before touching it.
  18. 18. SHARPS  Sharps (needles, broken glass, scalpels, razor blades, etc.) must not be disposed in the regular waste stream.  Needles and scalpels must be placed in red plastic “sharps” boxes and disposed of as biomedical waste, no matter if they are contaminated with a biological substance or not.  Syringes must be disposed of in the red sharps box for biomedical waste disposal whether or not they are contaminated. 19
  19. 19. FUME HOODS AND OTHER ENGINEERING CONTROLS  Examples of engineering controls include chemical fume hoods, glove boxes and remote automation that keeps a worker away from a dangerous process.  A fume hood must have an adequate face velocity (measured at the work opening) to ensure the proper removal of toxic materials 20
  20. 20. SAFETY EQUIPMENT  Maintain all safety related equipment and information clearly labeled and stored in the same area so it can be easily found in an emergency.  First Aid Kits  Spill Kits 21
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