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Girl child

Today we recognize that to try and improve the position of women one needs to look at the girl child who is a woman of tomorrow. Only when we visualize a female child with high self esteem not merely in recipient roles but in active productive roles with a concern for human dignity will be have strong and empowered women. The ultimate goal is to have an active, healthy and confident female child unfettered by 2009 2009 Social Institutions and Gender Index with equal access to knowledge information and opportunities.

A girl’s discrimination begins even before birth. Our statistics clearly point out to some facts that abortion of female fetuses is on the rise,It is reported that about 4,000 female babies are aborted in Tamil Nadu (southern India) every year. Sex determination tests are widely resorted to even in the remotest rural areas. Since most deliveries in rural areas take place at home, there is no record of the exact number of births/deaths that take place. Therefore, it is difficult to assess the magnitude of the problem. The ratio of female to male is declining. Even though the national sex ratio in the 2011 Census 944 is more than 2001’s 934, in states like Punjab, Haryana the sex ratio is about 899 and 885 respectively. There is reluctance to seek medical aid for ailing daughters. Regardless of the economic background the status of the female child has never been the same as that of the male at any level.

Gender roles are conceived, taught and enacted in a complex set of relationships within the family and society at large. Needless to say, the media reinforces the same stereotyped gender roles. The girl child grows up with a low self esteem. She grows up with a notion of temporary membership in her natal home to be disposed off with assets and dowry. A traditional saying sums it up thus, a daughter is like ghee (clarified butter)—both will stay good only upto a point. If you do not dispose them off they start stinking. Her productive role is to continue the household drudgery added to which is her reproductive responsibility.

The situation analysis of girl child is mentioned in this ppt.

Girl child

  1. 1. GIRL CHILD
  2. 2. INTRODUCTION ■ Achieving gender equality and empowering women is one of the important targets of the Millennium Development Goals (MDG). ■ Many efforts are being made at the international and the national level. ■ The United NationsOrganisation has declared “October 11” as the International Day for the Girl Child since 2012. ■ It is going to serve an important purpose of fetching the spotlight on the girl child and their problems.This activity aims to promote girl’s rights and highlight gender inequalities that exist between girls and boys.
  3. 3. ISSUES OF A GIRL CHILD
  4. 4. Female Infanticide and Foeticide ■ This practice was first discovered way-back in 1789. It was found to exist in various parts of the North and theWest India. ■ While the practice of female infanticide is killing daughters after birth, the current practice of female foeticide is eliminating her in her mother’s womb. ■ The census of 2011 has recorded the lowest ever sex ratio of 914 in the age group 0-6 years with 3 million missing girls; from 78.8 million in 2001 to 75.8 million in 2011. ■ Foetal sex determination and sex selective abortion by medical professionals has today grown into a Rs. 1,000 crore industry.This is covered under the Pre-Conception & Pre-Natal Diagnostic Techniques Act, 2002. ■ The cultural legacy of strong son preference, the practice of dowry, the perception of girls’ being a paraaya-dhan, problems related to the safety and marriage of a girl child, moksha, the patrilineal necessity of heir etc. are some of the reasons of female foeticide.
  5. 5. Child Marriage ■ In India, the legal age of marriage for a girl is 18 years. However, 36.8 percent of girls marry before attaining 18 years of age. ■ According to NFHS-III, 47.3 percent of the women surveyed within the age group of 20-24 were married before they attained the age of 18 years. Of these, 2.6 percent were married before they turned 13, 22.6 percent were married before the age of 16 and 44.5 percent were married between the age of 16-17 years. ■ Child marriage not only violates the human rights of the girl children but it also leads to several harmful consequences for them such as lack of opportunity to education, sexual exploitation, violence and early pregnancy. ■ The Child Marriage Restraint Act, 1929 prohibits marriages of children.Again, the Prohibition of the Child marriageAct, 2006 requires states/UTs to formulate rules to prevent child marriages in India.
  6. 6. Inadequate Nutrition ■ Globally, one third of the deaths of children under five years of age are attributed to malnutrition. ■ For the girls, the nutritional intake is relatively inferior both in terms of the quality and the quantity. Boys are given relatively more nutritious food, especially if the family is poor and is not in a position to provide nutritious food to all the children. ■ For addressing the problem of the health and nutrition among the adolescent girls, Kishori ShaktiYojana was launched in 2000 as part of the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS). Later in the year 2002-03, it was reinforced with the Nutritional Programme for the Adolescent Girls. ■ Various surveys indicate that women's caloric content is about 100 calories (per women per day) less than they spend, whereas men show an 800 caloric surplus intake.Women expend a great deal of energy working inside and outside the house, whereas they often have insufficient food. It has also lead to many cases of Maternal Death.
  7. 7. Disparity In Education ■ A study by the MHRD states that 3.7 percent children in the age group of 6-10 years and 5.2 percent in the age-group of 11- 13 years had either dropped out of the school or had never attended any school in 2008. ■ The enrolment ratio for girls in 2001 was 77 percent which went up to 93.6 percent in the year 2007. In that 24.4 percent dropped out in 2007-08.At the middle school level, the dropout rate amongst the girls was 41.3 percent while it was 57.3 percent at the secondary level. (Source : MHRD) ■ The Right to Education Act, 2010 provides for the free and compulsory education to children below 14 years of age.ThisAct also incentivises girls for completing elementary education. ■ There are several factors responsible for the dropping out of the girls such as early marriage, household works, assisting the family members, looking after siblings, distant schools, lack of female teacher, lack of toilet facilities etc.
  8. 8. Trafficking ■ Human trafficking is the third largest crime of the world. 79 percent of all global trafficking is for sexual exploitation. ■ In India, the volume of human trafficking increased tremendously. In 2007, the number of cases registered in India was 3991 which decreased to 3029 in 2008 and 2848 in 2009. ■ The number of children trafficked worldwide for sexual exploitation or cheap labour on an annual basis is 1.2 million. ■ Approximately 150,000 women and children are trafficked from South Asia. ■ At the international level, the problem is dealt with under the UN Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and PunishTrafficking in Persons EspeciallyWomen and Children, 2000 also known as theTrafficking Protocol which was adopted at the UNConvention against TransnationalOrganised Crime. ■ In India, girls have also been found to be trafficked for the purpose of marriage in Punjab and Haryana.
  9. 9. Sexual Harassment ■ Among the worst countries in crime, India has an abhorrent track record in all forms of sexual exploitation.The most terrible fall out of this is the lack of self worth and feeling of degradation following the emotional and physical trauma that constant harassment creates. ■ Such is the recurrence of these incidents that Delhi has earned the ignoble nickname of the ‘Rape Capital’.While most cases go unreported as it is considered an act that puts one to shame, only 20% of the registered cases for sexual harassment reach actual conviction. In every 10 rape cases,6 are of minor girls. Every 7 minutes, a crime is committed against women. Every 26 minutes, a women is molested. Every 34 minutes, a rape takes place. Every 42 minutes, a sexual harassment incident occurs. Every 43 minutes, a women is kidnapped. Every 93 minutes, a women is burnt to death over dowry. A shameful plight!!!
  10. 10. SOME INCREDIBLE FACTS
  11. 11. ■ UNICEF states that in 1984 in Bombay out of the 8,000 abortions that took place, 7,999 of them were girls. ■ In 1993 inTamil Nadu 196 girls died in suspicious circumstances. ■ According to a special report on the girl child and labour by International Labour Organisation (ILO) more than 100 million girl children between the ages of 5 and 17 are engaged in child labour, out of which over 50% of them are in hazardous industries, and 20% of those are below twelve years old. ■ According to United Nations Cyberschoolbus Paper on the girl child at least one in three girls and women worldwide has been physically harmed or sexually abused in her lifetime. Female genital mutilation though not common in India affects millions of girls and women every year. ■ Sakshi a Delhi based NGO conducted a survey of 357 school girl children: 63% have experienced serious sexual abuse or rape; 29% had forced oral sex, squeezing of breast, and genitals. In 30% of all cases, the person behind the act was a family member.There is also a rise of sexual abuse in schools, where teachers molest their students sometimes in the presence of other children.
  12. 12. The issues surrounding a girl child have been discussed in national child policies and laws and addressed in a few programmes such as – ■ The National Policy forChildren, 1974 ■ The National Plan of Action for Children, 2005 ■ The Pre-natal DiagnosticTechniques (Regulation and Prevention of Misuse) Act, 1994 ■ The ImmoralTraffic (Prevention) Act 1986 ■ The Juvenile Justice Act of 2000 ■ Indian Penal Code ■ Balika SamriddhiYojana ■ Kishori ShaktiYojana
  13. 13. ■ The Government of India has initiated a "save the girl child" campaign with the slogan "A happy girl is the future of our country“. ■ The UN has many initiatives that aim at the welfare of the girl child.The most significant one is the UN Girls' Education Initiative launched in April 2000, at theWorld Education Forum in Dakar, by United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan. ■ Plan U.K has launched a campaign called "Because I am a Girl".The two major objectives of their campaign is to create a forum in the UN for complaints against governments of countries and to ensure that the British governments aids for education to developing countries and given equally to boys and girls. ■ In 2004 the Nike Foundation was founded with the aim of addressing developmental issues of the adolescent girl.They released a series of videos and created a sub web page for their campaign : "The Girl Effect”.The Nike Foundation works with other organisations such as CARE and the UN Foundation to create opportunities for adolescent girls.
  14. 14. Beti Padhao, Beti Bachao Scheme ■ Literally meaning ‘Educate the Girl Child, Save the Girl Child’ the BPBB Scheme is an ambitious scheme of the Government of India which is intended to generate massive awareness, improvement of quality of welfare services for females and helping them (girls and women) access these services better. ■ Introduced in October of 2014, the Beti Bachao, Beti Padhao Scheme goes on to address the declining Child Sex Ratio in the country. ■ The scheme is being rolled out through pan-India campaigns with focus on 100 worst-performing districts in terms of CSR. It is a joint initiative of three important Central Government ministries – the Ministry ofWomen and Child Development, Ministry of Health and FamilyWelfare and Ministry of Human Resource Development.
  15. 15. REFERENCE ■ Swetha Prasad, (2012), Girl Child In India : Issues Concerning Children, Yojana Publication ■ Child Protection and Child Rights, www.childline.org ■ Importance of Girl Child in Indian Society, (2012) Save the Girl Child Society. ■ Rukmini Shrinivasani, India : deadliest place in world for girl child, (Feb, 2012), Times of India
  16. 16. A huge salute to all the mothers who have saved and protected their girl children… Thank You All.. Presented By – Shanmukha Priya Chadarada
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Today we recognize that to try and improve the position of women one needs to look at the girl child who is a woman of tomorrow. Only when we visualize a female child with high self esteem not merely in recipient roles but in active productive roles with a concern for human dignity will be have strong and empowered women. The ultimate goal is to have an active, healthy and confident female child unfettered by 2009 2009 Social Institutions and Gender Index with equal access to knowledge information and opportunities. A girl’s discrimination begins even before birth. Our statistics clearly point out to some facts that abortion of female fetuses is on the rise,It is reported that about 4,000 female babies are aborted in Tamil Nadu (southern India) every year. Sex determination tests are widely resorted to even in the remotest rural areas. Since most deliveries in rural areas take place at home, there is no record of the exact number of births/deaths that take place. Therefore, it is difficult to assess the magnitude of the problem. The ratio of female to male is declining. Even though the national sex ratio in the 2011 Census 944 is more than 2001’s 934, in states like Punjab, Haryana the sex ratio is about 899 and 885 respectively. There is reluctance to seek medical aid for ailing daughters. Regardless of the economic background the status of the female child has never been the same as that of the male at any level. Gender roles are conceived, taught and enacted in a complex set of relationships within the family and society at large. Needless to say, the media reinforces the same stereotyped gender roles. The girl child grows up with a low self esteem. She grows up with a notion of temporary membership in her natal home to be disposed off with assets and dowry. A traditional saying sums it up thus, a daughter is like ghee (clarified butter)—both will stay good only upto a point. If you do not dispose them off they start stinking. Her productive role is to continue the household drudgery added to which is her reproductive responsibility. The situation analysis of girl child is mentioned in this ppt.

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