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Steven Virgadamo presents Improving and Advancing Advancement Efforts

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Steve Virgadamo a thought leader in education reform discusses advancing the mission of a Catholic School.

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Steven Virgadamo presents Improving and Advancing Advancement Efforts

  1. 1. AGENDA I. Review + Summary – 2012-13 Objectives A. Increasing enrollment (dashboards) B. Advancement Plan new staff, board role, dashboards C. Strategic Plan D. Board Development/Formation finance, tuition, Catholic mission, membership, Advancement committee II. Updates TIL WE MEET AGAIN III. Enrollment Management – board need to know – DO? IV. Advancement – board need to know – DO? IMPROVING AND ENHANCING ADVANCEMENT EFFORTS STEVEN VIRGADAMO PRESENTER Diocese of Pittsburgh
  2. 2. It all begins with the Coffee aaa Diocese of Pittsburgh
  3. 3. It all begins with the Coffee aaa Diocese of Pittsburgh
  4. 4. Nona’s Coffee aaa Diocese of Pittsburgh
  5. 5. Historical Perspective Diocese of Pittsburgh 18841884 Plenary Council of Baltimore 20% of Catholic Schools Close 19641964 19721972
  6. 6. Definition of Advancement Advancement is both a concept and a process which holds that the highest destiny of any school can only be realized when everyone involved in the life of the school analyzes the philosophy, articulates a specific mission, embraces a particular vision, crystallizes the objectives, projects them into the future and takes the necessary steps to realize them. Diocese of Pittsburgh
  7. 7. Formula for a successful Advancement Program Quality Catholic Education + Sound Business Management + Effective Marketing = Pupils, People and Dollars Diocese of Pittsburgh
  8. 8. Formula for a successful Advancement Program  Providing Evidence of Quality Catholic Education +  Providing Evidence of Good Business Management • Involvement of people through Boards and committees • Long-range strategic and operational planning • Effective budgeting • Effective communications +  Effective Marketing • Image • Enrollment • Resources = People and Dollars Diocese of Pittsburgh
  9. 9. Formula for a successful Advancement Program • Understanding • Commitment • Involvement of People • Strategic Plan • Comprehensive Communication/Effective Marketing • Funding Diocese of Pittsburgh
  10. 10. Formula for a successful Advancement Program • Gift Opportunities • Annual Fund • Periodic Capital Campaign • Endowment Growth via Planned Gifts Diocese of Pittsburgh
  11. 11. Annual Fund • The Annual Fund is more than just a fund campaign. • It is a coordinated, concentrated effort on the part of the school to plan one major, professional effort producing better results than many small campaigns. • The Annual Fund Drive solicits gifts each year from all school constituencies. • The philanthropic dollars secured are typically used to fund the implementation of the strategic planning goals Diocese of Pittsburgh
  12. 12. Annual Fund  The Annual Fund creates opportunities to improve record keeping and recognize individual donors for their support.  The Annual Fund must be carefully coordinated with other fundraising endeavors of the school. Diocese of Pittsburgh
  13. 13. Annual Fund The successful Annual Fund: • Involves people in your ministry and mission; • Enables your school to test its case in the marketplace; • Educates donors regarding your mission, goals and needs; • Enables your school to broaden its base of support (increased participation by all of your publics should be a priority goal for each year); • Encourages donors to adopt an annual giving habit. Diocese of Pittsburgh
  14. 14. Annual Fund • The Annual Fund dollar goal should be established each year utilizing the data from previous fundraising efforts to prepare a standard gift range table. The standard gift range table is a very accurate tool for establishing an Annual Fund goal for a Catholic school. Any standard gift range table should be prepared utilizing the following rules: • Lead gift (1) must equal 10% of the overall goal; • Two gifts (2) must each equal 5% of the overall goal; • The top ten to twelve (10 – 12) gifts (including the three gifts mentioned above) must equal 33% of the overall goal; • The next approximately 100 to 150 gifts must equal 33% of the overall goal; • Many, many gifts equal the bottom third of the goal. Diocese of Pittsburgh
  15. 15. Annual Fund • The Annual Fund dollar goal should be established each year utilizing the data from previous fundraising efforts to prepare a standard gift range table. The standard gift range table is a very accurate tool for establishing an Annual Fund goal for a Catholic school. Any standard gift range table should be prepared utilizing the following rules: • Lead gift (1) must equal 10% of the overall goal; • Two gifts (2) must each equal 5% of the overall goal; • The top ten to twelve (10 – 12) gifts (including the three gifts mentioned above) must equal 33% of the overall goal; • The next approximately 100 to 150 gifts must equal 33% of the overall goal; • Many, many gifts equal the bottom third of the goal. Diocese of Pittsburgh
  16. 16. Annual Fund • Rules: • Lead Gift (1) equals 10% of the overall goal; • Two gifts (2) equals 5% of the overall goal; • Top ten to twelve gifts must equal one-third of the overall goal; • Next approximately 100 to 150 gifts must equal one-third of the overall goal; • Bottom third is many gifts. Diocese of Pittsburgh
  17. 17. Sample Standard Gift Range Table Gifts No. of Prospects Amount Total Cumulativ e No. of Solicitors 1 5 $6,000 $6,000 $6,000 1 2 10 $3,000 $6,000 $12,000 2 9 27 $1,000 $9,000 $21,000 5 10 30 $600 $6,000 $27,000 6 20 40 $300 $6,000 $33,000 8 90 180 $100 $9,000 $42,000 NA Many Small Gifts X<$100 $18,000 $60,000 NA Goal: $60,000Goal: $60,000
  18. 18. Organizational Structure For The Annual Fund Annual Fund Steering Cabinet Major Gift Phase Parent Phase Alumni Phase Faculty/ Staff Phase School Board Phase Grandparen t Phase Business/ Civic Phase Other
  19. 19. Annual Fund • The process of the Annual Fund is based on three principles: 1. The school community is a composite of concentric rings around the school operation, each with its own level of interest and sense of “ownership” in the destiny of the institution. 2. The closer a particular group is to the school center, the greater the participation in the Annual Fund must be. 3. The most effective way to approach the various school publics is through the help of people who are in that public Diocese of Pittsburgh
  20. 20. Annual Fund • The process of the Annual Fund is based on three principles: 1. The school community is a composite of concentric rings around the school operation, each with its own level of interest and sense of “ownership” in the destiny of the institution. 2. The closer a particular group is to the school center, the greater the participation in the Annual Fund must be. 3. The most effective way to approach the various school publics is through the help of people who are in that public Diocese of Pittsburgh
  21. 21. Sample Annual Fund Status Memo Phase # of Gifts $ Goal # of Gifts $ Pledged # of Gifts $ Recv’d % Goal Pledged % Goal Recv’d Average Gift Amount Needed to Achieve Goal Parents Parishioners Alumni Parents of Alumni Grandparents Major Gifts Friends Date:Date: Week:Week:
  22. 22. Solicitation Techniques “I have been so many years collecting money for churches and institutions of all kinds that I have come to the conclusion that there is no way of getting it except by personal appeal to those who have it, and that appeal the coming from the lips of an enthusiastic speaker.” Archbishop Patrick Riordan Archbishop Of San Francisco, 1912 From Page 127 of The Catholic Philanthropic Tradition In America By Mary J. Oates Diocese of Pittsburgh
  23. 23. The Anatomy of an Encounter •Opening •Questions •Presenting •Negotiating (overcoming objections) •Listening •Closing
  24. 24. Solicitation Techniques • Opening • Greeting and introduction • Questioning for common ground • Winning credibility • Getting attention - opening communication lines • Safeguarding control of encounter • Sizing up prospect • Initial diagnosis • Personal impact Diocese of Pittsburgh
  25. 25. Solicitation Techniques •Presentation •Probing for motives •Presenting the case - features and benefits •Challenging reaction to case - questioning •Listening and reflection •Identify needs Diocese of Pittsburgh
  26. 26. Solicitation Techniques •Closing •Define expected results •Assist in problem solving •Restate commitment • Ask for active participation Diocese of Pittsburgh
  27. 27. Solicitation Techniques • Ask OPEN-ENDED questions whenever possible. Open-ended questions usually begin with “What” or “How.” • When you ask questions, LISTEN to the whole answer • Listen selectively, and then ask FOLLOW UP questions about the parts of your prospect's previous answers you'd like to emphasize. • Ask FACT FINDING questions. • Ask FEELING questions to uncover your prospect’s beliefs on issues related to education. • Ask REACTION questions. • Ask NEED questions (e.g. Have you considered the tax benefits?) • Always…Always…Always prepare questions for each prospect IN ADVANCE! Diocese of Pittsburgh
  28. 28. Solicitation Techniques • How do you feel about…? • How would you describe the problem of _____ in our community? • What do you think we should be doing about ____? • If you had $1,000,000 to spend on improving the quality of life in our community, what would you do with it? • In you opinion, what are the most important things we do? • Exactly what do you mean when you say _____? • I think the most important issue is _____. How do you feel about that? • Last year, you gave us $____. What made you donate to us? • How do you think your late husband would feel about this? • If you were in our position, what would be your next step? • Who else do you think would be interested in this project? Diocese of Pittsburgh
  29. 29. Life Cycle of a Major Donor $$$Gifts$$$Gifts 25 35 45 55 65 75 85 AgeAge Deferred Gift Zone Motivation to Give Financial Capability
  30. 30. And that takes us back to…. The Coffee! Diocese of Pittsburgh
  31. 31. Marketing DefinedMarketing Defined Marketing is the process of researching, analyzing, planning, implementing, and controlling carefully formulated programs designed to bring about voluntary exchange relationships with specifically targeted audiences. Diocese of Pittsburgh
  32. 32. Marketing A ServiceMarketing A Service RELATIONSHIPS RELATIONSHIPS RELATIONSHIPS Diocese of Pittsburgh
  33. 33. Understanding EnrollmentUnderstanding Enrollment Parents choose a Catholic School: • Perception of better academic quality; • Structure, safety, discipline; • Religious values. Diocese of Pittsburgh
  34. 34. Justification of the Purchase DecisionJustification of the Purchase Decision • More dollars are paid for the purchase; • When the purchase decision is close to one’s heart (emotional ties). The Value Proposition ““Is this the best place for my childIs this the best place for my child given the money I am spending?given the money I am spending?”” Diocese of Pittsburgh
  35. 35. Factors Influencing Student RetentionFactors Influencing Student Retention 1. Development of one-to-oneone-to-one relationships; 2. Attending a school with friendsfriends; 3. Genuine sense of belongingsense of belonging; 4. Perception of successPerception of success in the academic program; 5. ParticipationParticipation in co-curricular activities. Diocese of Pittsburgh
  36. 36. Characteristics of Schools with High RetentionCharacteristics of Schools with High Retention RatesRates • Ensure a good fitgood fit between the student/family and the school; • Provide a high-qualityhigh-quality academic and educational experience; • Have a faculty/stafffaculty/staff who daily demonstrate a caring attitudecaring attitude; • Provide adequate financial aidadequate financial aid; • Offer extensive co-curricular opportunitiesextensive co-curricular opportunities to involve students in campus life; Diocese of Pittsburgh
  37. 37. Characteristics of Schools with High RetentionCharacteristics of Schools with High Retention RatesRates • Have a comprehensive and well-articulated counseling and advising programcounseling and advising program; • Provide comprehensive support servicescomprehensive support services; • Identify and work with “at risk” students“at risk” students; • Build connections and foster a sense of belongingsense of belonging; • Provide a “look ahead”“look ahead” for the year to come; • Assess and work to fulfillwork to fulfill student and parent expectationsexpectations; • Never forget the relationshiprelationship with the consumer by consistently meetingconsistently meeting student needsstudent needs. Diocese of Pittsburgh
  38. 38. Marketing MantraMarketing Mantra The consistent delivery of the right messageright message, to the right personright person, in the right way,right way, at the right time.right time. Diocese of Pittsburgh
  39. 39. The Right PersonThe Right Person Diocese of Pittsburgh Generation Birth Year Range GI Generation 1909-28 (Ages 81-100) Silent Generation 1929-45 (Ages 64-80) Baby Boomers 1946-64 (Ages 45-63) Generation X 1965-82 (Ages 27-44) Generation Y* 1983-01 (Ages 8-26) *Millennials or Echo Boomers Source: National Center for Health Statistics via http://www.boomerproject.com/home.php 45,000,000 living 70,000,000 living 62,000,000 births 75,000,000 births
  40. 40. Generation X Generational ValuesGenerational Values Techno savvy Think globally Self-reliance Diversity Pragmatic Risk-takersRisk-takers SkepticalSkeptical IndependentIndependent Task-drivenTask-driven Defining EventsDefining Events Watergate Single parents Latchkey kids MTV AIDs Computers Challenger Glasnost Berlin Wall Source: National Center for Health Statistics via http://www.boomerproject.com/home.php
  41. 41. Generation Y Generational ValuesGenerational Values Confidence plus Civic duty Achievement Street smarts Multi-tasking on steroids Fearless OptimisticOptimistic Co-dependentCo-dependent TenaciousTenacious Defining EventsDefining Events Internet chat School violence Over-involved parenting Multi-culturalism World Trade Center attacks Gulf War Iraq Source: National Center for Health Statistics via http://www.boomerproject.com/home.php
  42. 42. The Right Message • Test scores; • Honor roll; • Student-Teacher ratio; • Graduation and high school acceptances; • Integration of technology; • Classroom settings; • Daily schedule; • Faculty training and accomplishments; • Scholastic competition and awards; • Curricular highlights; • Special academic programs. Better academic quality:
  43. 43. The Right Message • Faith integration/Catholic identity throughout; • Religious curriculum; • Opportunities for worship; • Role of the Pastor and other religious; • Service expectations; • Masses; • Sacramental preparation; • Prayer services. Religious values:
  44. 44. The Right Message • Environment of respect; • Classroom management; • Student mentoring; • Rules and expectations for behavior; • Safety procedures on campus; • Before and after school programs; • Extensive co-curricular opportunities; • Counseling and advising program; • Transportation; • Parent involvement. Safety, structure, and discipline:
  45. 45. The Right Message • Faith integration/Catholic identity throughout; • Religious curriculum; • Opportunities for worship; • Role of the Pastor and other religious; • Service expectations; • Masses; • Sacramental preparation; • Prayer services. Religious values:
  46. 46. The Right Way GI/Silent Personal direct mail letters, print (Ages 64+) (newspaper/magazine), TV, face-to-face event marketing Baby Boomers Direct mail letters, postcards, print (Ages 45-63) (newspaper/magazine), TV, web supported Generation X TV and radio, movie trailers, phone messages, (Ages 27-44) email marketing (not texting) Generation Y* Text messaging, voicemail, email, internet sites (Ages 8-26) *Millennials or Echo Boomers Source: National Center for Health Statistics via http://www.boomerproject.com/home.php ResearchResearch Generational media preferences:
  47. 47. The Right Way Generation XGeneration X Ages 27-44 • TV and radio; • Movie trailers; • Phone messages; • Email marketing (not texting). Generation YGeneration Y Ages 8-26 • Text messaging; • Voicemail; • Email; • Internet sites. Source: National Center for Health Statistics via http://www.boomerproject.com/home.php
  48. 48. The Right Way: Generation X/Y Marketing Focus:Marketing Focus: • Acquire address lists of parents with children under 2 years of age within your community. • Build a relationship with first-time parents (mothers) as early as possible. • Provide convenient opportunities for interaction with school teachers and parents. • Provide clear examples and statistics on student and faculty accomplishments from academic and spiritual perspectives. • Enlist Pre-K and Kindergarten parents to actively refer and recruit new parents for enrollment. • Use technology both to establish and maintain a dialog with Generation X parents. Diocese of Pittsburgh
  49. 49. The Right Mix Key Components:Key Components: • General School Information • Mission Statement • Leadership and Personnel • Strategic Goals • Needs of the School • Catholic Identity • Academic Excellence/Curriculum • Extracurricular Activities • Social Interaction • Safety, Structure, and Discipline • Home-School Communication • Parent Involvement Infused with:Infused with:  Happy Students  Unique aspects  High quality  True to mission  Faith-filled  Goal-oriented  Strong community
  50. 50. The Doctrine of the Trinity Diocese of Pittsburgh

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