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Unit 8, Chapter27
CPO Science
Foundations of Physics
Unit 8: Matterand Energy
 27.1 Properties of Solids
 27.2 Properties of Liquids and Fluids
 27.3 Properties of Gases
Ch...
Chapter27 Objectives
1. Performcalculations involving the density of solids, gases, and
liquids.
2. Apply the concepts of ...
Chapter27 Vocabulary Terms
 stress
 density
 strain
 tensile strength
 cross section area
 pressure
 volume
 tensi...
27.1 Properties of Solids
Key Question:
How do you measure the
strength of a solid
material?
*Students read Section 27.1
A...
27.1 Properties of Solids
 The density of a
material is the ratio of
mass to volume.
 Density is a physical
property of ...
27.1 Density
ρ = m
V
Mass (kg)
Volume (m3
or L)
Density (kg/m3
)
 Most engineers and scientists use the greek letter
rho ...
27.1 Densities of Common Materials
 Which materials are less dense than water?
27.1 Properties of Solids
 The concept of physical
“strength” means the
ability of an object to hold
its form even when f...
27.1 Stress
 The stress in a material is the ratio of the force acting
through the material divided by the cross section ...
27.1 Properties of Solids
26.1 Properties of Solids
 A thicker wire can
support more force
at the same stress
as a thinner wire
because the cross
s...
26.1 Tensile strength
 The tensile strength is the stress at which a
material breaks under a tension force.
 The tensile...
27.1 Tensile strength
27.1 Properties of solids
 The safety factor is the ratio of how strong
something is compared with how strong it has to
b...
27.1 Evaluate 3 Designs
 Three designs have been proposed forsupporting a section of road.
 Each design uses three suppo...
27.1 Evaluate Design #1
 High strength steel tubes
 Cross section = 0.015 m2
 Tensile strength = 600 Mpa
27.1 Evaluate Design #2
 Aluminumalloy tubes
 Cross section = 0.015 m2
 Tensile strength = 290 Mpa
27.1 Evaluate Design #3
 Steel cables
 Cross section = 0.03 m2
 Tensile strength = 400 Mpa
27.1 Properties of solids
 Elasticity measures the ability of a material to
stretch.
 The strain is the amount a materia...
27.1 Strain
 The Greek letter epsilon (ε) is usually used to
represent strain.
ε = ∆l
l
Change in
length (m)
Original len...
27.1 Properties of solids
 The modulus of elasticity
plays the role of the
spring constant for solids.
 A material is el...
27.1 Modulus of Elasticity
27.1 Stress forsolids
 Calculating stress forsolids is similarto using
Hooke's law forsprings.
 Stress and strain take t...
27.1 Properties of solids
 The coefficient of thermal
expansion describes how much a
material expands foreach
change in t...
27.1 Thermal Expansion
∆l = α (T2-T1)
l
Change in
temperature (o
C)
Original length (m)
Coefficient of thermal expansionCh...
27.1 Thermal Expansion
 Which substances will
expand orcontract
the most with
temperature changes?
27.1 Plastic
 Plastics are solids formed from long chain
molecules.
 Different plastics can have a wide range of
physica...
27.1 Metal
 Metals that bend and stretch easily without
cracking are ductile.
 The properties of metals can be changed b...
27.1 Wood
 Many materials have different properties in
different directions.
 Wood has a grain that is created by the wa...
27.1 Composite materials
 Composite materials are made
from strong fibers supported
by much weaker plastic.
 Like wood, ...
27.2 Properties of Liquids and Fluids
Key Question:
What are some implications of Bernoulli’s equation?
*Students read Sec...
27.2 Properties of Liquids and Fluids
 Fluids can change shape and flow when forces
are applied to them.
 Gas is also a ...
27.2 Density vs. Buoyancy
 The density of a liquid is the ratio of mass to
volume, just like the density of a solid.
 An...
27.2 Pressure
 Forces applied to fluids
create pressure instead
of stress.
 Pressure is force per
unit area, like stress...
27.2 Pressure
 Like stress, pressure is a ratio of force per unit
area.
 Unlike stress however, pressure acts in all
dir...
27.2 Pressure
 The concept of pressure is
central to understanding how
fluids behave within
themselves and also how fluid...
27.2 Properties of liquids and gases
 Gravity is one cause of
pressure because fluids
have weight.
 Air is a fluid and t...
27.2 Properties of liquids and gases
 The pressure at any
point in a liquid is
created by the weight
of liquid above that...
27.2 Pressure in liquids
 The pressure at the same depth is the same
everywhere in any liquid that is not moving.
P = ρ g...
27.2 Calculate pressure
 Calculate the pressure 1,000 meters
below the surface of the ocean.
 The density of wateris 1,0...
27.2 Properties of liquids and gases
 Pressure comes from collisions between atoms or
molecules.
 The molecules in fluid...
27.2 Pressure and forces
 Pressure creates force on surfaces.
 The force is equal to the pressure times the area
that co...
27.2 Calculate pressure
 A car tire is at a pressure of
35 psi.
 Four tires support a car that
weighs 4,000 pounds.
 Ea...
27.2 Motion of fluids
 The study of motion of fluids is called fluid
mechanics.
 Fluids flow because of differences in p...
27.2 Properties of liquids and gases
 A flow of syrup down a
plate shows that
friction slows the syrup
touching the plate...
27.2 Properties of liquids and gases
 Pressure and energy
are related.
 Differences in
pressure create
potential energy ...
27.2 Properties of liquids and gases
 Pressure does work as
fluids expand.
 A pressure of one
pascal does one joule
of w...
27.2 Energy in fluids
 The potential energy is equal to volume times
pressure.
E = P V
Pressure (N/m2
)
Volume (m3
)
Pote...
27.2 Energy in fluids
 The total energy of a small mass of fluid is equal
to its potential energy from gravity (height) p...
27.2 Energy in fluids
 The law of conservation of
energy is called Bernoulli’s
equation when applied to
a fluid.
 Bernou...
27.2 Bernoulli's Equation
 If one variable increases, at least one of the othertwo
must decrease.
 If the fluid is not m...
27.2 Properties of liquids and gases
 Streamlines are imaginary lines drawn to show
the flow of fluid.
 We draw streamli...
27.2 Applying Bernoulli's equation
 The wings of airplanes are made in the shape of
an airfoil.
 Air flowing along the t...
27.2 Calculating speed of fluids
 Water towers create
pressure to make water
flow.
 At what speed will water
come out if...
27.2 Fluids and friction
 Viscosity is caused by forces
that act between atoms and
molecules in a liquid.
 Friction in f...
27.3 Properties of Gases
Key Question:
How much matter is
in a gas?
*Students read Section 27.3 AFTER Investigation 27.3
27.3 Properties of Gases
 Air is the most important
gas to living things on the
Earth.
 The atmosphere of the
Earth is a...
27.3 Properties of Gases
 An object submerged in gas feels an upward
buoyant force.
 You do not notice buoyant forces fr...
27.3 Boyle's Law
 If the mass and temperature are kept constant, the
product of pressure times volume stays the same.
P1V...
27.3 Calculate using Boyle's law
 A bicycle pump creates
high pressure by squeezing
airinto a smallervolume.
 If airat a...
27.3 Charles' Law
 If the mass and volume are kept constant, the pressure
goes up when the temperature goes up.
Original ...
27.3 Calculate using Charles' law
 A can of hairspray has a pressure
of 300 psi at room temperature
(21°C or294 K).
 The...
27.3 Ideal gas law
 The ideal gas law combines the pressure, volume,
and temperature relations for a gas into one
equatio...
27.3 Gas Constants
 The gas
constants are
different because
the size and
mass of gas
molecules are
different.
27.3 Ideal gas law
 If the mass and temperature are kept constant, the
product of pressure times volume stays the same.
P...
27.3 Calculate using Ideal gas law
 Two soda bottles contain the same
volume of airat different pressures.
 Each bottle ...
Application: The Deep Water Submarine
Alvin
041316 properties of_matter+physics_chpt27
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041316 properties of_matter+physics_chpt27

  1. 1. Unit 8, Chapter27 CPO Science Foundations of Physics
  2. 2. Unit 8: Matterand Energy  27.1 Properties of Solids  27.2 Properties of Liquids and Fluids  27.3 Properties of Gases Chapter27 The Physical Properties of Matter
  3. 3. Chapter27 Objectives 1. Performcalculations involving the density of solids, gases, and liquids. 2. Apply the concepts of force, stress, strain, and tensile strength to simple structures. 3. Describe the cause and some consequences of thermal expansion in solids, liquids, and gases. 4. Explain the concept of pressure and calculate pressure caused by the weight of fluids. 5. Explain how pressure is created on a molecularlevel. 6. Understand and apply Bernoulli’s equation to flow along a streamline. 7. Apply the gas laws to simple problems involving pressure, temperature, mass, and volume.
  4. 4. Chapter27 Vocabulary Terms  stress  density  strain  tensile strength  cross section area  pressure  volume  tension  compression  elastic, elasticity  fluid  brittle  ductile  safety factor  modulus of elasticity  alloy  airfoil  buoyancy  fluid mechanics  ideal gas law  Boyle’s law  streamline  laminarflow  turbulent flow  Bernoulli’s equation  pascal (Pa)  Charles’ law  gas constant (R)  composite material  thermal expansion
  5. 5. 27.1 Properties of Solids Key Question: How do you measure the strength of a solid material? *Students read Section 27.1 AFTER Investigation 27.1
  6. 6. 27.1 Properties of Solids  The density of a material is the ratio of mass to volume.  Density is a physical property of the material and stays the same no matter how much material you have.
  7. 7. 27.1 Density ρ = m V Mass (kg) Volume (m3 or L) Density (kg/m3 )  Most engineers and scientists use the greek letter rho (ρ) to represent density.
  8. 8. 27.1 Densities of Common Materials  Which materials are less dense than water?
  9. 9. 27.1 Properties of Solids  The concept of physical “strength” means the ability of an object to hold its form even when force is applied.  To evaluate the properties of materials, it is sometimes necessary to separate out the effects of design, such as shape and size.
  10. 10. 27.1 Stress  The stress in a material is the ratio of the force acting through the material divided by the cross section area through which the force is carried.  The metric unit of stress is the pascal (Pa).  One pascal is equal to one newton of force persquare meterof area (1 N/m2 ). σ = F A Force (N) Area (m2 ) Stress (N/m2 )
  11. 11. 27.1 Properties of Solids
  12. 12. 26.1 Properties of Solids  A thicker wire can support more force at the same stress as a thinner wire because the cross section area is increased.
  13. 13. 26.1 Tensile strength  The tensile strength is the stress at which a material breaks under a tension force.  The tensile strength also describes how materials break in bending.
  14. 14. 27.1 Tensile strength
  15. 15. 27.1 Properties of solids  The safety factor is the ratio of how strong something is compared with how strong it has to be.  The safety factor allows for things that might weaken the wire (like rust) or things you did not consider in the design (like heavier loads).  A safety factor of 10 means you choose the wire to have a breaking strength of 10,000 newtons, 10 times stronger than it has to be.
  16. 16. 27.1 Evaluate 3 Designs  Three designs have been proposed forsupporting a section of road.  Each design uses three supports spaced at intervals along the road.  A total of 4.5 million N of force is required to hold up the road.  Evaluate the strength of each design.  The factorof safety must be 5 orhighereven when the road is bumper- to-bumperon all 4 lanes with the heaviest possible trucks.
  17. 17. 27.1 Evaluate Design #1  High strength steel tubes  Cross section = 0.015 m2  Tensile strength = 600 Mpa
  18. 18. 27.1 Evaluate Design #2  Aluminumalloy tubes  Cross section = 0.015 m2  Tensile strength = 290 Mpa
  19. 19. 27.1 Evaluate Design #3  Steel cables  Cross section = 0.03 m2  Tensile strength = 400 Mpa
  20. 20. 27.1 Properties of solids  Elasticity measures the ability of a material to stretch.  The strain is the amount a material has been deformed, divided by its original size.
  21. 21. 27.1 Strain  The Greek letter epsilon (ε) is usually used to represent strain. ε = ∆l l Change in length (m) Original length (m) Strain
  22. 22. 27.1 Properties of solids  The modulus of elasticity plays the role of the spring constant for solids.  A material is elastic when it can take a large amount of strain before breaking.  A brittle material breaks at a very low value of strain.
  23. 23. 27.1 Modulus of Elasticity
  24. 24. 27.1 Stress forsolids  Calculating stress forsolids is similarto using Hooke's law forsprings.  Stress and strain take the place of force and distance in the formula: σ = -E ε Modulus of elasticity (pa) Strain Stress (Mpa)
  25. 25. 27.1 Properties of solids  The coefficient of thermal expansion describes how much a material expands foreach change in temperature.  Concrete bridges always have expansion joints.  The amount of contraction or expansion is equal to the temperature change times the coefficient of thermal expansion.
  26. 26. 27.1 Thermal Expansion ∆l = α (T2-T1) l Change in temperature (o C) Original length (m) Coefficient of thermal expansionChange in length (m)
  27. 27. 27.1 Thermal Expansion  Which substances will expand orcontract the most with temperature changes?
  28. 28. 27.1 Plastic  Plastics are solids formed from long chain molecules.  Different plastics can have a wide range of physical properties including strength, elasticity, thermal expansion, and density.
  29. 29. 27.1 Metal  Metals that bend and stretch easily without cracking are ductile.  The properties of metals can be changed by mixing elements.  An alloy is a metal that is a mixture of more than one element.  Steel is an alloy.
  30. 30. 27.1 Wood  Many materials have different properties in different directions.  Wood has a grain that is created by the way trees grow.  Wood is very difficult to break against the grain, but easy to break along the grain.  A karate chop easily breaks wood along its grain.
  31. 31. 27.1 Composite materials  Composite materials are made from strong fibers supported by much weaker plastic.  Like wood, composite materials tend to be strongest in a preferred direction.  Fiberglass and carbon fiber are two examples of useful composite materials.
  32. 32. 27.2 Properties of Liquids and Fluids Key Question: What are some implications of Bernoulli’s equation? *Students read Section 27.2 AFTER Investigation 27.2
  33. 33. 27.2 Properties of Liquids and Fluids  Fluids can change shape and flow when forces are applied to them.  Gas is also a fluid because gases can change shape and flow.  Density, buoyancy and pressure are three properties exhibited by liquids and gases.
  34. 34. 27.2 Density vs. Buoyancy  The density of a liquid is the ratio of mass to volume, just like the density of a solid.  An object submerged in liquid feels an upward force called buoyancy.  The buoyancy force is exactly equal to the weight of liquid displaced by the object.  Objects sink if the buoyancy force is less than their own weight.
  35. 35. 27.2 Pressure  Forces applied to fluids create pressure instead of stress.  Pressure is force per unit area, like stress.  A pressure of 1 N/m2 means a force of one newton acts on each square meter.
  36. 36. 27.2 Pressure  Like stress, pressure is a ratio of force per unit area.  Unlike stress however, pressure acts in all directions, not just the direction of the applied force.
  37. 37. 27.2 Pressure  The concept of pressure is central to understanding how fluids behave within themselves and also how fluids interact with surfaces, such as containers.  If you put a box with holes underwater, pressure makes waterflow in fromall sides.  Pressure exerts equal force in all directions in liquids that are not moving.
  38. 38. 27.2 Properties of liquids and gases  Gravity is one cause of pressure because fluids have weight.  Air is a fluid and the atmosphere of the Earth has a pressure.  The pressure of the atmosphere decreases with altitude.
  39. 39. 27.2 Properties of liquids and gases  The pressure at any point in a liquid is created by the weight of liquid above that point.
  40. 40. 27.2 Pressure in liquids  The pressure at the same depth is the same everywhere in any liquid that is not moving. P = ρ g d Density (kg/m3 ) Depth (m) Pressure (pa or N/m2 ) Strength of gravity (9.8 N/kg)
  41. 41. 27.2 Calculate pressure  Calculate the pressure 1,000 meters below the surface of the ocean.  The density of wateris 1,000 kg/m3 .  The pressure of the atmosphere is 101,000 Pa.  Compare the pressure 1,000 meters deep with the pressure of the atmosphere.
  42. 42. 27.2 Properties of liquids and gases  Pressure comes from collisions between atoms or molecules.  The molecules in fluids (gases and liquids) are not bonded tightly to each otheras they are in solids.  Molecules move around and collide with each otherand with the solid walls of a container.
  43. 43. 27.2 Pressure and forces  Pressure creates force on surfaces.  The force is equal to the pressure times the area that contacts the molecules. F = P A Pressure (N/m2 ) Area (m2 ) Force (N)
  44. 44. 27.2 Calculate pressure  A car tire is at a pressure of 35 psi.  Four tires support a car that weighs 4,000 pounds.  Each tire supports 1,000 pounds.  How much surface area of the tire is holding up the car?
  45. 45. 27.2 Motion of fluids  The study of motion of fluids is called fluid mechanics.  Fluids flow because of differences in pressure.  Moving fluids usually do not have a single speed.
  46. 46. 27.2 Properties of liquids and gases  A flow of syrup down a plate shows that friction slows the syrup touching the plate.  The top of the syrup moves fastest because the drag from friction decreases away from the plate surface.
  47. 47. 27.2 Properties of liquids and gases  Pressure and energy are related.  Differences in pressure create potential energy in fluids just like differences in height create potential energy from gravity
  48. 48. 27.2 Properties of liquids and gases  Pressure does work as fluids expand.  A pressure of one pascal does one joule of work pushing one square meter a distance of one meter.
  49. 49. 27.2 Energy in fluids  The potential energy is equal to volume times pressure. E = P V Pressure (N/m2 ) Volume (m3 ) Potential energy (J)
  50. 50. 27.2 Energy in fluids  The total energy of a small mass of fluid is equal to its potential energy from gravity (height) plus its potential energy from pressure plus its kinetic energy.
  51. 51. 27.2 Energy in fluids  The law of conservation of energy is called Bernoulli’s equation when applied to a fluid.  Bernoulli’s equation says the three variables of height, pressure, and speed are related by energy conservation.
  52. 52. 27.2 Bernoulli's Equation  If one variable increases, at least one of the othertwo must decrease.  If the fluid is not moving (v =0), then Bernoulli’s equation gives us the relationship between pressure and depth (negative height).
  53. 53. 27.2 Properties of liquids and gases  Streamlines are imaginary lines drawn to show the flow of fluid.  We draw streamlines so that they are always parallel to the direction of flow.  Fluid does not flow across streamlines.
  54. 54. 27.2 Applying Bernoulli's equation  The wings of airplanes are made in the shape of an airfoil.  Air flowing along the top of the airfoil (B) moves faster than air flowing along the bottom of the airfoil (C).
  55. 55. 27.2 Calculating speed of fluids  Water towers create pressure to make water flow.  At what speed will water come out if the water level in the tower is 50 meters higher than the faucet?
  56. 56. 27.2 Fluids and friction  Viscosity is caused by forces that act between atoms and molecules in a liquid.  Friction in fluids also depends on the type of flow.  Water running from a faucet can be either laminar or turbulent depending on the rate of flow.
  57. 57. 27.3 Properties of Gases Key Question: How much matter is in a gas? *Students read Section 27.3 AFTER Investigation 27.3
  58. 58. 27.3 Properties of Gases  Air is the most important gas to living things on the Earth.  The atmosphere of the Earth is a mixture of nitrogen, oxygen, water vapor, argon, and a few trace gases.
  59. 59. 27.3 Properties of Gases  An object submerged in gas feels an upward buoyant force.  You do not notice buoyant forces from air because the density of ordinary objects is so much greater than the density of air.  The density of a gas depends on pressure and temperature.
  60. 60. 27.3 Boyle's Law  If the mass and temperature are kept constant, the product of pressure times volume stays the same. P1V1 = P2V2 Original volume (m3 ) Original pressure (N/m2 ) Final pressure (N/m2 ) Final volume (m3 )
  61. 61. 27.3 Calculate using Boyle's law  A bicycle pump creates high pressure by squeezing airinto a smallervolume.  If airat atmospheric pressure (14.7 psi) is compressed froman initial volume of 30 cubic inches to a final volume of three cubic inches, what is the final pressure?
  62. 62. 27.3 Charles' Law  If the mass and volume are kept constant, the pressure goes up when the temperature goes up. Original temperture (k) Original pressure (N/m2 ) Final pressure (N/m2 ) Final temperature (K) P1 = P2 T1 T2
  63. 63. 27.3 Calculate using Charles' law  A can of hairspray has a pressure of 300 psi at room temperature (21°C or294 K).  The can is accidentally moved too close to a fire and its temperature increases to 800°C (1,073 K).  What is the final pressure in the can?
  64. 64. 27.3 Ideal gas law  The ideal gas law combines the pressure, volume, and temperature relations for a gas into one equation which also includes the mass of the gas.  In physics and engineering, mass (m ) is used for the quantity of gas.  In chemistry, the ideal gas law is usually written in terms of the number of moles of gas (n) instead of the mass (m ).
  65. 65. 27.3 Gas Constants  The gas constants are different because the size and mass of gas molecules are different.
  66. 66. 27.3 Ideal gas law  If the mass and temperature are kept constant, the product of pressure times volume stays the same. P V = m R T Volume (m3 ) Pressure (N/m2 ) gas constant (J/kgK) Temperature (K) Mass (kg)
  67. 67. 27.3 Calculate using Ideal gas law  Two soda bottles contain the same volume of airat different pressures.  Each bottle has a volume of 0.002 m3 (two liters).  The temperature is 21°C (294 K).  One bottle is at a gauge pressure of 500,000 pascals (73 psi).  The otherbottle is at a gauge pressure of zero.  Calculate the mass difference between the two bottles.
  68. 68. Application: The Deep Water Submarine Alvin

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