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Family disaster prepradeness

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Lecture on Family disaster planning in the 2015 Postgraduate Course in Emergency Medicine UP PGH

Published in: Healthcare
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Family disaster prepradeness

  1. 1. Family Disaster Preparedness Teodoro J. Herbosa, MD FPCS Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine College of Medicine University of the Philippines, Manila
  2. 2. Family Disaster Preparedness Teodoro Herbosa MD A/Professor 6 University of the Philippines, Manila Former Undersecretary of Health (2010-2015)
  3. 3. Typhoon Patsy 1970 Yoling, twenty-seventh named storm, twelfth typhoon, and seven Highest winds: 250 km/h Lowest pressure: 918 mb Date: November 14, 1970 – November 22, 1970 Affected areas: Philippines, Vietnam Wikipedia
  4. 4. • Typhoon Yoling It made landfall in Luzon with 130 mph (210 km/h) sustained wind speeds on November 19, 1970 • US$80 million ($403 million in 2005) in damage was reported to have been caused by Patsy (Yoling), though the total was likely higher. Deaths were officially reported to be 241, but an estimated 30 people unofficially died in Vietnam, raising the toll to 271+. And additional 351 people were reported missing. The total deaths and damage will likely be never known, as the Vietnam War was raging on at the same time.
  5. 5. Priorities of Action Sendai Framework • Priority 1: Understanding disaster risk. • Priority 2: Strengthening disaster risk governance to manage disaster risk. • Priority 3: Investing in disaster risk reduction for resilience. • Priority 4: Enhancing disaster preparedness for effective response and to “Build Back Better” in recovery, rehabilitation and reconstruction.
  6. 6. DRRMC's • Regional DRRMC • Provincial DRRMC • City DRRMC • Municipal DRRMC • Barangay DRRMC
  7. 7. Do we have Family DRRMC's?
  8. 8. Preparedness Planning • What if? • Hazards & Risks • Needs • Logistics • Drills • Implement • Evaluate, Re evaluate
  9. 9. Family Disaster Plans • Talk about hazards • Four steps to Safety • 1. Find out what could happen to you • 2. Create a Family Disaster Plan • 3. Complete your checklists • 4. Practice and maintain your plan
  10. 10. 1. Find out what could happen to you • What type of disasters are most likely to happen in your community? • How should you prepare for each? • Does the community have an public warning system? • What about animals after a disaster? • If you care for elderly or disabled, how would you care for them. • What are the disaster plans at your workplace, at your children's schools, at the day care and other other places your family members frequent?
  11. 11. 2. Create a Family Disaster Plan • Meet with your family and discuss why you need to prepare for disaster • Discuss the types of disasters that are most likely to happen. Explain what to do in each case. • Pick two places to meet: • Right outside of your home in case of a sudden emergency, like a fire. • Outside of your neighborhood in case you can’t return home or are asked to leave your neighborhood. Everyone must know the address and phone number of the meeting locations.
  12. 12. 2. Create a Family Disaster Plan • Develop an emergency communication plan • Ask an out-of-town relative or friend to be your "family contact." • Discuss what to do if authorities ask you to evacuate. • Be familiar with escape routes. • Plan how to take care of your pets
  13. 13. 3. Complete your checklists • Post by phones emergency telephone numbers (fire, police, ambulance, etc.). • Teach all responsible family members how and when to turn off the water, gas, and electricity at the main switches or valves. • Check if you have adequate insurance coverage • Install smoke alarms on each level of your home, especially near bedrooms
  14. 14. 3. Complete your checklists • Get training from the fire department on how to use your fire extinguisher (A-B-C type), and show family members where extinguishers are kept. • Conduct a home hazard hunt. • Stock emergency supplies and assemble a Disaster Supplies Kit. • Keep a smaller Disaster Supplies Kit in the trunk of your car
  15. 15. 3. Complete your checklists • Keep a portable, battery-operated radio or television and extra batteries. • Consider using a "NOAA Weather Radio" with a tone-alert feature. PAGASA and news channels • Take a Red Cross first aid and CPR class. • Plan home escape routes
  16. 16. 3. Complete your checklists • Find the safe places in your home for each type of disaster • Make two photocopies of vital documents and keep the originals in a safe deposit box. Keep one copy in a safe place in the house, and give the second copy to an out-of-town friend or relative. • Make a complete inventory of your home, garage, and surrounding property.
  17. 17. 4. Practice and maintain your plan. • Quiz your kids every six months so they remember what to do, meeting places, phone numbers, and safety rules. • Conduct fire and emergency evacuation drills at least twice a year • Replace stored food and water every six months • Use the test button to test your smoke alarms once a month
  18. 18. 4. Practice and maintain your plan. • If you have battery-powered smoke alarms, replace batteries at least once a year. • Replace your smoke alarms every 10 years. • Look at your fire extinguisher to ensure it is properly charged.
  19. 19. Disaster supplies kit • A portable, battery-powered radio or television and extra batteries. • Flashlight and extra batteries. • First aid kit and first aid manual. • Supply of prescription medications. • Credit card and cash. • Personal identification.
  20. 20. Disaster supplies kit • An extra set of car keys. • Matches in a waterproof container. • Signal flare. • Map of the area and phone numbers of places you could go. • Special needs, for example, diapers or formula, prescription medicines and copies of prescriptions, hearing aid batteries, spare wheelchair battery, spare eyeglasses, or other physical needs.
  21. 21. Family Disaster Plans • Talk about hazards • Four steps to Safety • 1. Find out what could happen to you • 2. create a Family Disaster Plan • 3. Complete your checklists • 4. Practice and maintain your plan
  22. 22. Preparedness is the key Bayanihan Spirit

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