Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Presentations on the impact of Cloud-based teaching and teacher education on teachers and trainers

Sofie De Cupere (editor),
School on the Cloud,
ICT Key Action 3 European Project

Participants in Working Group 2 (i-Teacher) have prepared presentations on the impact of Cloud-based teaching, teacher education, training and on the relationship between the “use of Cloud-based teaching” and the mobile, connected and social media use in i-classroom. Discussion and analysis is focused on the identification of training needs for teachers and trainers and produce a guide to Cloud-based terminology. The issues associated with mainstreaming innovation has been discussed and a series of recommendations resulted to a model of vision and practical strategic outlines. These are published as a training needs manifesto for educational organizations and for decision makers.

  • Be the first to comment

Presentations on the impact of Cloud-based teaching and teacher education on teachers and trainers

  1. 1. School on the Cloud: Connecting Education to the Cloud for Digital Citizenship Presentations on the impact of Cloud-based teaching and teacher education on teachers and trainers June 2015 SchoolontheCloud.eu Work Group 2 i-Teacher Presentations, a guide to terminology and training needs manifesto
  2. 2. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 2 School on the Cloud D3.1 Deliverable Title: Presentations on the impact of Cloud-based teaching and teacher education on teachers and trainers Deliverable Nr: 3.1 Final date of deliverable: 01/06/2015 Version: 2.0 Dissemination Level: Public Editor: Sofie De Cupere Project Title: School on the Cloud (SoC) Project Nr: 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW Project Start Date: June 30, 2015 Duration: 36 months European Commission: Lifelong Learning Program - ICT Key Action 3 European Project This project has been funded with support from the European Commission, Lifelong Learning Programme of the European Union. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.
  3. 3. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 3 School on the Cloud D3.1 “School on Cloud: Connecting Education to the Cloud for Digital Citizenship” European Commission: Lifelong Learning Program ICT Key Action 3 European Project 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW Presentations on the impact of Cloud-based teaching and teacher education on teachers and trainers Working Group 3: Deliverable 3.1 Editor: Sofie De Cupere Due date of deliverable : 01 June 2015 (Version 1.0) Final date of deliverable: 01 June 2015 (Version 2.0) Start date of project : January 1, 2014 Duration : 36 months Dissemination Level : Public Abstract: Participants in Working Group 2 (i-Teacher) have prepared presentations on the impact of Cloud-based teaching, teacher education, training and on the relationship between the “use of Cloud- based teaching” and the mobile, connected and social media use in i-classroom. Discussion and analysis is focused on the identification of training needs for teachers and trainers and produce a guide to Cloud-based terminology. The issues associated with mainstreaming innovation has been discussed and a series of recommendations resulted to a model of vision and practical strategic outlines. These are published as a training needs manifesto for educational organizations and for decision makers. With the support of the Lifelong Learning Programme of the European Union
  4. 4. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 4 School on the Cloud D3.1 - Antonina Bliort - Apostolopoulou Katerina - Armstrong Ms Niamh - Claudia Ribeiro - Conea Gabriela - Cristiana Martinha - Cruces Fernando - De Angelis Kylene - Donert Karl - Dr. Eng. Elmo De Angelis - Ferreira Dário - Ferreira Sandra - Gonzalez Gonzalez, María Jesús - Koller Alfonz - Lázaro y Torres, María Luisa - Leonardi Simonetta - Nunes Célia - Pöckl Mag. Anita - Rocha Sérgio - Sanchez Isaac Buzo - Schmeinck Prof. Dr. Daniela - Siegmund Alexander - Silva Durval Vieira - Sotiriou Chryssanthe - Spigarelli Sandra - Strobl Prof Dr. Josef - Tiago Reigada - Totev Todor - Toteva Kalinka - Ulrich Michel - Valcke Andries - Vandeborne Nicole - Vogler Robert A lot of internal and external colleagues of GO! have helped us to make the presentations. We would like to thank them very much for their time and excellent work: - De Vleesschauwer Elisabeth, Verleijen Jacques, De Ridder Kevin, Van Boven Hans, Vermeersch Jens, Vliegen Pascal, Buytaert Jan and Descamps Sofie, form GO! - Lepomme Rudi, from Gartner - Cuyt Bram, from Scholengroep Rivierenland - Barrix Ken and De Pril Filip, from Scholengroep Brussel - Devlies Erik, from Klascement - Bruggeman Bram, from Bramvuur Special thanks to Barrix Ken (who joined our meeting in Porto) for his great contribution to the deliverables and De Cupere Katrien who has helped with the translations.
  5. 5. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 5 School on the Cloud D3.1 Table of contents The road to the presentations....................................................................6 Pre-assignment ............................................................................................ 6 Results of the pre-assignment......................................................................9 First submeeting ........................................................................................ 31 Results of the first submeeting .................................................................. 35 The presentations........................................................................................ 41 A presentation on the impact of cloud based teaching on teachers........... 41 A presentation on the impact of cloud based teaching on teacher education, to get a diploma, during life time. ............................................ 45 A glossary................................................................................................... 45 A presentation of cloud based teaching with the use of social media and mobile devices. What is an iClassRoom?................................................... 46 A presentation on Innovation-recommendations, based on a vision ......... 47 A manifesto for educational organizations and decision makers................ 50
  6. 6. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 6 School on the Cloud D3.1 The road to the presentations Pre-assignment Homepage: http://linoit.com/users/sofiedecupere/canvases/iTeacher%20Porto Assignment: https://iteacherporto.wikispaces.com/home We encouraged our partners to do this assignment in group, working together per country.
  7. 7. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 7 School on the Cloud D3.1
  8. 8. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 8 School on the Cloud D3.1
  9. 9. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 9 School on the Cloud D3.1 Results of the pre-assignment Not every partner filled in every part of the pre-assignment. This is the result. Austria: https://iteacherporto.wikispaces.com/Austria In what way is the digital gap between parents and children handled within the context of the school and what role will the teacher play? Nowadays the "digital gap" between parents and children are not so big any more, children learn from parents and vice versa. A prime question for school is to focus digital knowledge for good paths in learning and getting competences. Not every digital tool is suitable therefore and basic competences and skills (writing, reading and calculating) of students are basic required, often before getting forward in digital skills. School and teacher should focus on suitable ways to meet the main goals of education. Teachers are getting more and more in the role of learning mentors/consultants/advisors and accompanists of students. In which manner can a teacher follow and adapt to the quick social technical innovations within the educational process? 1. teacher in-service training courses with focus on social/technical innovations 2. participation in research projects/networks with Focus on social/technical innovations 3. contact with universities and/or research institutes in the field of social/technical innovation 4. didactic/technical literature 5. information in special webpages for teachers 6. teacher trainer in social/technical innovation 7. in Notebook/project classes What ways does a teacher have to address the Government about the facilities he/she needs, now and in the near future? 1. subject specific networks (in every federal state and one national wide working group of all 9 federal state working groups in specific subjects -> national wide umbrella groups) 2. study/working groups in different subjects 3. labor unions 4. indirect via school/education inspection 5. indirect via school leadership/management -> school leadership councils in every federal states 6. informal in face-to-face contacts in conferences about school development, the future of ICT in schools etc. 7. informal in face-to-face contacts in celebrations of school prizes and projects awards 8. contact to special study group members initiated by the federal ministry of education Belgium: https://iteacherporto.wikispaces.com/Belgium In what ways can the new technologies improve/change the core educational processes? Well-being and involvement: In our contemporary education ICT is a huge challenge to improve learning skills of the children. We must ensure that we can guide them in a safe, responsible and effective use of ICT. Therefore we emphasize the following strategic goal: All teachers use ICT to realize powerful learning environments and give their students the required guidance so they can practice ICT in a competent and thoughtful way. Learning capability: Starting from this strategy we define the following learning capabilities: - A teacher has a positive and balanced attitude towards ICT and can use ICT in a safe, sustainable, adequate, flexible and creative way. He is familiar with the basic skills in ICT and is responsible to educate it to the students.
  10. 10. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 10 School on the Cloud D3.1 - A teacher is familiar with the digital world and can guide, inspire and teach students in choosing and using ICT resources adequately so that it is an enrichment in the learning environment. - A teacher is able to select, to insert and/or to create ICT applications to realize an added value in an efficient and didactic way. Qualification: To work towards these learning capabilities it is important to have insight into a powerful learning environment and how ICT can be integrated. We start with the theory of "process-oriented feedback". The teacher guides the students in discovering own mistakes, determining & adjusting strategies and asking for help. The teacher must focus on the objectives preconceived in the learning environment. He gives clarity to the students on the goals to be achieved. This way of teaching develops the skills of the students in guiding and maintaining their own learning process. Independency is a large concept. We distinguish three levels: independent working, independent learning and responsible learning. With the integration of ICT, three aspects play a crucial role: 1. Asking the right questions on the cognitive level: - Knowledge (to search and to reproduce information) - Insight (to identify and to indicate information) - Synthesis (to be creative with the knowledge and the insight) 2. Selecting suitable resources via internet: - Educational resources (to test knowledge, to practice skills) - Authentic resources (to enhance the skills, to give insight into the processes) 3. Providing materials and programs What must an iTeacher be able to do? We bring together all the elements from the core process into a teaching model. Within that model there must be a meaningful, varied and balanced range. It is every teacher’s challenge to succeed in this purpose. 1. Students "inform" in a digital environment. It means that students incorporate the learning content and give it a meaning. The teacher starts from a didactic learning concept after which the students appeal to their information skills (orientating, collecting, selecting and judging). 2. Students "create" in a digital environment. The teacher advises the students on how to process and how to shape the learning content. The teacher meets the need of media skills in which the students are challenged on a technical, a creative, a reflective and a social level. 3. Students "apply" in a digital environment. The students immerse themselves in the learning content and give it value. It is meaningful for a teacher to start from a certain context. However, in order to enforce the effect on learning it is as important as to “decontextualize” or to apply. This way the students come to a better understanding of the learning content. What must a school be able to do so that future teachers can succeed in their new mission? 1. Schools integrate ICT to support and strengthen the primary processes. The introduction of ICT does not lead to an improvement in results, but education can be strengthened and supported. The supporting character offers the advantage that the teachers can use the released time for more targeted interactions with the students. Additional with a custom range of software, opportunities arise to strengthen the educational learning process. Learning in a digital environment works motivating. There is the opportunity to work at your own pace, get feedback, to plan, etc. ICT makes education more fun (involvement), stimulates contact (interaction) and makes time-and location-independent learning possible (differentiation). The use of ICT resources and applications must be the result of a didactic vision. From the didactic vision professional and determined choices are to be made by the teachers. 2. Schools have an ICT minded profile. Teachers don’t have to be technical experts, but ICT minded. It means that they should be able to apply ICT. Teachers should be aware of the role of ICT in the digital world of the students and the use of it as a teaching tool. From this notion the teachers reflect on their own knowledge and skills
  11. 11. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 11 School on the Cloud D3.1 and take initiative to professionalize. Teachers should also be aware of the need for ICT in their management. It is expected that they see opportunities in organizing activities with ICT. The educational aim is of much greater importance than the chosen technology. 3. Schools develop a strong organizational structure for ICT integration. ICT integration should be organized on two levels: a central point (a ICT squad) and the periphery (the teachers). The ICT squad is responsible for a framework where the “ICT awareness” is incorporated. Proposals are submitted to the teachers in terms of reality and attainability. Teachers can communicate their needs to the ICT squad. The needs will be translated into action. 4. Schools ensure good management and infrastructure. Schools should consider a custom infrastructure that enables teachers and students to deploy ICT in different ways. Technical systems must be used responsibly so that they last for a long time. Stability is the first characteristic. It refers to fixed and/or wide systems. The school should pay attention to uniformity and standardization. Flexibility is the second characteristic. It refers to replaceable and/or adaptable systems. Bulgaria: https://iteacherporto.wikispaces.com/Bulgaria What must an iTeacher be able to do? The future skills and competences of a teacher: Teachers need to improve knowledge and skills to enhance, improve and explore their teaching practices. Fundamental skills come first - like managing electronic files, using computerized databases and spreadsheets, sending and receiving e-mail messages, and creating documents with graphics are no longer a taboo. These skills are prerequisites for more advanced skills, such as accessing online resources, creating desktop publishing documents, developing multimedia presentations, selecting and customizing instructional software to fit students' needs, streamlining record-keeping and other administrative procedures with electronic tools, and observing the correct protocols in sharing intellectual property. The competencies are organized into five aspects: productivity, communication, research, media and presentation. The values a teacher lives by in the future: As a rule, every educated man is a man of Values. Teaching is a classic example of action based on values although professionally teachers are often expected to live in a neutral world. The term ‘intrinsic satisfiers’ is used by the Institute for Public Policy Research report (Edwards, 2002) to denote those things which are essential to teachers’ sense of professional fulfilment. He argues that professional wastage will only be reduced by enhancing the positive features of the job - the core work of contact with pupils, enhancing responsibility to determine the course of events, with scope and freedom to apply initiative and creative skills to both content and pedagogy. Such satisfiers may include: - Autonomy - Being valued - Being trusted - Being listened to - Time for learning, teaching and planning - Collegiality - Initiative - Creativity - Contact with pupils - Foresight and will to meet and resolve problems - Scope for innovation and experimentation, etc. This is a tall order, but that is the responsibility that the teacher must take in order to be an effective catalyst for social change.
  12. 12. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 12 School on the Cloud D3.1 The future structures and organizations in which a teacher will work: The future is about access, anywhere learning and collaboration, both locally and globally. Teaching and learning is going to be social and networking (including internationally) is the key. A wide range of organizational forms and settings emerge, with strong emphasis on non-formal learning. - Public and private learning online networks - Knowledge societies - Learning Centers The information a future teacher will need/have: Todays’ free flow of information presupposes well-informed students who in some cases might know more than their teachers. It does mean teachers need to know everything but they need to know reliable sources of information and knowledge to provide to their students. Technological systems a future teacher will use/need: All currently available, in addition to the new ones to come up. Generally speaking, teachers to use the technologies which their students are into. What must a school be able to do so that future teachers can succeed in their new mission? What new structures and organizational forms will future schools have? Education is a conservative system. But special technological departments will appear, as well as new digitalized administration. What information must future schools have and produce? Reliable and secure What will be the core values a future school must embrace? Freedom, tolerance, and experimentation. http://www.newschool.edu/mission-vision Technological systems a future school need? Incorporating relevant new technologies. What must educational authorities be able to do so that future teachers can succeed in their new mission? Will current educational authorities remain the educational authorities in the future? Will there be more authorities (-levels)? Will they be interdependent? Dissatisfaction with institutionalized provision and expression given to diversified demand leads to the abandonment of schools in favor of a multitude of learning networks, quickened by the extensive possibilities of powerful, inexpensive ICT. The de-institutionalization, even dismantling, of school systems as part of the emerging "network society". Various cultural, religious and community voices to the fore in the socialization and learning arrangements for children, some very local in character, others using distance and cross-border networking. What policies must be designed and supervised by future educational authorities? - Sharing best practices on the ability of the authorities to adapt to the changes in and influencing education - Enabling schools towards a more autonomous and self-improving school system - Learning from experience - A radical change in the assessment process would be needed, but this would be more reflective of the workplace and would be particularly relevant in a world that needs to encourage and nurture more entrepreneurial tendencies. What will be the scope of the future tasks of educational authorities? - Raising the quality of teaching and leadership - Creation of a better and more diverse school system - Improving behavior and attendance in schools What will be the guiding values for future educational authorities? Values in education of all times should and do follow society. In times when most of all people look for appreciation, undoubtedly education must seek for ways to support and reward attendance and achievements. The credit system in education is a needed firm step in the right direction. What information and systems are required for these authorities? - all-time research on the needs and tendencies - systematic evaluation of the results
  13. 13. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 13 School on the Cloud D3.1 - well observed and results-based allocation of duties - more autonomous and self-improving school system - appreciation and stimulation of good will and practices What will be the impact of the social context on the educational eco system? In what way is the digital gap between parents and children handled within the context of the school and what role will the teacher play? Technological changes have always created challenges for parents. The main concern is that technologies reduce the legitimacy of parental influence while increasing influences from unknown and often unwanted sources. With so much amazing (and not so great) content available, the role of the teacher is changing to act more like a curator or guide. The aim of which is to develop opportunities for young learners to have a more emotional connection with their learning material. With this in mind, the role of the teacher is more important than ever. But it’s not only about the change from teacher to that of facilitator of learning, the role of the teacher is going to evolve and become more important than ever. Beyond technological advancement, a core feature of modernity is the capacity (and desire) to continuously transcend the limits of our human nature. In such a world, if parents desire to influence their children, they may need to choose limits, for their children and for themselves. Resisting the desire to overcome limits and embracing some self-imposed constraints, as difficult as it is, may be what parents need to navigate the digital age. In which manner can a teacher follow and adapt to the quick social technical innovations within the educational process? Teaching is a complex activity. Competent teachers apply broad, deep, and integrated sets of knowledge and skills as they plan for, implement, and revise instruction. Technology proficiency (including technical skills and instructional applications) is but one dimension of teacher competence. The acquisition of technology knowledge and skills must be connected with the development of a broader array of competencies. The International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) has actively addressed the technology isolation problem and has recently released a set of revised teacher technology standards. Developed through a rigorous process of expert and lay-person input, the NETS-T Project (National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers) explicitly describes what competent teachers should know and should be able to do with technology in the context of broader teacher competencies. The NETS-T standards are categorized as follows: 1. technology operations and concepts, 2. planning and designing learning environments and experiences, 3. teaching, learning, and the curriculum, 4. assessment and evaluation, 5. productivity and professional practice, social, ethical, legal, and human issues. How does a teacher handle scientific criticism regarding technical innovation in education? Making use of technology to allow students the freedom to discover solutions to problems both independently and collaboratively is a force for good. Educators strive for students to engage with their subject beyond a superficial level. Students are expected to be active learners, learners who have a thirst for discovery and knowledge. Technology places the world in the hands of every student inside the confines of the classroom. For many of the4 educator it feels counterintuitive to allow students the space to discover solutions as these might not be the ones we genuinely wanted them to find. Allowing the use of technology in the classroom does free the teacher from the lesson-plan shackles. What ways does a teacher have to address the Government about the facilities he/she needs, now and in the near future? Not alone, but as part of social and professional networks, including parents and the students themselves.
  14. 14. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 14 School on the Cloud D3.1 Greece: https://iteacherporto.wikispaces.com/Greece In what ways can the new technologies improve/change the core educational processes? New technologies can improve educational processes and learning outcomes according to the paradigm of Computer Supported Collaborative Learning. This theoretical field studies how people can learn together using computers. Collaboration is encouraged when a group of students use cloud-based applications to discuss, debate and present what they have found collaboratively. Cloud-based applications can support face to face or distant interaction synchronously or asynchronously R. Keith Sawyer , Gerry Stahl, Timothy Koschmann , Dan Suthers, Computer Supported Collaborative Learning. Retrieved by http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.434.9240 Stahl, G, Koschmann, T. & Suthers, D. (2006). Computer supported collaborative learning: An historical perspective. In R. K. Sawyer (Ed) Cambridge Handbook of the learning sciences. Cambridge. pp. 409-427 http://gerrystahl.net/cscl/CSCL_English.pdf Stahl, G. (2000). A model of collaborative knowledge-building. In Ann Arbor (Ed) Proceedings of Fourth International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS 2000)MI. Retrieved by http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.113.2787 Ron Oliver , Arshad Omari , Mt Lawley (2001). Student responses to collaborating and learning in a Web-based environment. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning. Retrieved by http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.87.6910 Lehtinen, E., Hakkaraninen, K. & Lipponen, L. Computer supported collaborative learning. A Review. retrieved by http://www.comlab.hut.fi/opetus/205/etatehtava1.pdf Well-being and involvement: Organizing student council, networking of NGO's and environmental-cultural policy makers. Learning capability: Specialized applications aiming at specific learning abilities, Bilingual children, Autistic children, Dyslectics. Qualification: educational scenarios development, content, methodologies, evaluation, grades. The last two processes are supported by on-line tools as Edmondo. Talent development: e-Porfolio, e-art exhibions . Other comments: This framework if it is presented in a unified platform may be very helpful tool in education. In Greece cloud-based technologies for educational use in under construction under the project Digital School e-me (http://dschool.edu.gr).Currently teachers and students have access to the platform Digital School books and Fotodentro, digital repository of educational materials. The Panhellenic School Network (www.sch.gr) offers a variety of digital tools such as e-mail, e-class, teleconferencing, European school radio, blogs-webpages, e- magazines. What must an iTeacher be able to do? http://www.media-and-learning.eu/resource/eduvista-toolkit http://www.coetail.com/wayfaringpath/files/2014/10/The-Profile-of-a-Modern-Teacher.png The future skills and competences of a teacher: e.g. the way a teacher predicts and solves new technical and educational problems. Adapt existing scenarios and utilize new technologies. Write educational scenarios incorporating new data and new tools. Make effective use of classroom scenarios.
  15. 15. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 15 School on the Cloud D3.1 The values a teacher lives by in the future: The teachers should see themselves as co-learners, not teachers Lifelong learning. Allow their students to teach each other and participate in a community of learners Embrace change. Collaborate with colleagues to solve problems. Don't wait until they are experts to introduce something new to their students. The future structures and organizations in which a teacher will work: Museums-educational programs, ESRI. Technological systems a future teacher will use/need: mobile applications. What must a school be able to do so that future teachers can succeed in their new mission? What new structures and organizational forms will future schools have? Report cards with passwords to the parents. Applications for monitoring student absences with password from parents and teachers Networking with social services, healthcare services etc. for progress reports and collaboration with school teachers. What information must future schools have and produce? Environmental data - ex. mm of rainfall Citizen data. What will be the core values a future school must embrace? Embrace change and collaborate with different organizations. Technological systems a future school need? Wireless network. What must educational authorities be able to do so that future teachers can succeed in their new mission? Will current educational authorities remain the educational authorities in the future? Will there be more authorities (-levels)? Will they be interdependent? The current educational authorities can remain but they should create new structures for technological support of schools. What will be the scope of the future tasks of educational authorities? Set a framework. What will be the guiding values for future educational authorities? European identity and networking. What information and systems are required for these authorities? Networking with European authorities. What will be the impact of the social context on the educational eco system? In what way is the digital gap between parents and children handled within the context of the school and what role will the teacher play? School can organize meetings with parents and specialists that discuss and propose solutions to bridge the gap. In which manner can a teacher follow and adapt to the quick social technical innovations within the educational process? Participate in conferences, European projects. How does a teacher handle scientific criticism regarding technical innovation in education? Suggesting that we are in the process of testing new tools.
  16. 16. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 16 School on the Cloud D3.1 Ireland: https://iteacherporto.wikispaces.com/Ireland In what ways can the new technologies improve/change the core educational processes? The Case of Ireland: At primary level, new regulations have been introduced by the Teaching Council and Teacher Education has been reconceptualized. The Teaching Council identifies ICT as a priority in initial teacher training. The Bachelor of Education programs for primary teaching includes ‘an increased emphasis on the key strategic priorities of literacy and numeracy, ICT and inclusion’ DES (2013). The program was designed to take into account the change in Irish society and the dynamic arena of digital technologies. The conceptualized program provides the opportunity to enhance the digital literacy of teachers and maps the Irish school curriculum to this digital landscape. At post-primary level, again the introduction of a Teaching Council is being new regulation within a legislative context and accordingly, influences what is being delivered on teacher education programs as well as undergraduate general degrees. Junior Cycle is in the process of Reform. Eight principles underpin the Framework for Junior Cycle: Quality, Wellbeing, Creativity and Innovation, Choice and flexibility, Engagement and participation, Inclusive education, Continuity and development, Learning to learn. These principles will inform the planning for, as well as the development and the implementation of junior cycle programs in all schools. An optional program for coding in Transition Year emerged from the ICT action plan. This program "Having Fun with Computer Programming and Games" is one step to address the importance of including code as part of a digital literacy agenda. The public examination system is in the process of the most significant reform since the formation of the state. Vocational post-primary education has also being revamped reduction of 33 bodies to 16. FAS gone to SOLAS.NQAI FETAC and HETAC now merged into We now have one single body for Quality and Qualifications Ireland (QQI) with the amalgamation of FETAC, HETAC, NQAI and the IUQB. A wave of migration into Ireland began in the early 2000s and the new multicultural society has brought new challenges to the education system. These challenges include for example managing multi-lingual classrooms as well as different religious beliefs and traditions. At tertiary level, change is driven by the need for greater efficiencies in the public finances as well as, like all EU countries, the desire to compete globally? The numbers of institutions in the system has been reduced from 39 in 2012 to 24 in 2014. Institutional mergers have been encouraged and five regional clusters have been established. According to Brosnan (2013), a review of the literature on higher education internationally foregrounds systems undergoing profound transformation and reform (Schuetze and Slowey, 2000; Skilbeck, 2001; Schonburg and Teichler, 2006; Tapper and Palfreyman, 2010; Filappakou, Salter and Tapper, 2012). Trends towards globalisation, marketisation, technological advances, massification and diversification of the student body, as well as greater accountability to a wide range of stakeholders, are identified as drivers of this reform (Kogan and Hanney, 2000; Clark, 2004; Tapper and Palfreyman, 2010; De Zilma, 2010). Ireland is no different. All levels of the Irish education system are experiencing different change and reform. In Ireland the program for Government includes a national digital strategy. The integration of ICT into the teaching and learning environment of school is a prior in this strategy. A Digital Strategy for School is underway at the moment following a broad consultation process with the key or major stakeholders. Focus groups are convening to overview the outcomes and discuss our future digital agenda and map out a digital policy for Irish schools ( DES 2014). Digital literacy is to the forefront of the National Literacy and Numeracy Strategy ( DES 2011). The National Council for Curriculum and Assessment (NCCA) is developing an integrated language curriculum for primary schools to embed development of digital literacy. In relation to digital skills and knowledge on how best to use ICT in teaching and learning, a range of courses are available through Professional Development Service for Teachers (PDST), Technology in Education. These courses provide examples of teachers best practice and innovative ideas to integrate ICT and highlight administrative efficiencies. These services will combine to ensure that the effective use of ICT will be demonstrated in all professional development opportunities offered to teachers. All registered Newly Qualified Teachers (NQTs) both at primary and post-primary levels have to attend National Induction Program for Teachers workshops. Through Scoilnet, the national portal, teachers have access to thousands of resources to enhance their teaching. Other resources for example, Living Schools Lab project
  17. 17. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 17 School on the Cloud D3.1 to showcase, upscale and mainstream innovative use of ICT in both primary and secondary schools. The project maths website provides examples of best practice in using dynamic technology in the teaching of mathematics. Many Universities and colleges provide valuable information through their centers of excellence to support teaching and learning in schools. For example the National Centre for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching and Learning http://www.nce-mstl.ie/ provide mathematics resources for teachers. Department of Education and Science inspectorate reports, stated that there was ‘an ongoing need to promote and develop opportunities for the use of ICT by learners to make, create and learn actively through ICT over and above the use of ICT by teachers to support lesson delivery’ (DES, 2013 page 8). DES (2008) ICT in Schools - Inspectorate Evaluation Studies. Dublin: Department of Education and Science. Retrieved November 26 at: http://www.education.ie/en/Publications/Inspection-Reports-Publications/Evaluation-Reports- Guidelines/ICT-in-Schools-Inspectorate-Evaluation-Studies.pdf DES (2013) Digital Literacy: Submission by the Department of Education and Skills to the Joint Oireachtas Committee on Education and Social Protection. Department of Education and Skills, Feb. 2013. DES (2011) Literacy and Numeracy for Learning and Life Dublin: Department of Education and Science. DES (2013b) Chief Inspector's Report 2010-12. Dublin: Department of Education and Skills DES (2014) Report on the 2013 ICT Census. Dublin: Department of Education and Skills (published Spring 2014)Joint Advisory Group to the Minister (2009) Smart Schools = Smart Economy: Report of the ICT in Schools Joint Advisory Group to the Minister for Education and Science. Dublin: Irish Computer Society and Department of Education and Science. Minister’s Strategy Group (2008) Investing Effectively in Information and Communication-Technology in Schools 2008-2013. Dublin: Department of Education and Science. NCCA (2012) Literacy in Early Childhood and Primary Education (3-8 years) Dublin: National Council for Curriculum and Assessment. Technology in Schools 2008-2013. Dublin: Department of Education and Science. Well-being and involvement: The general aims of primary education in Ireland: “This vision of education can be expressed in the form of three general aims: - to enable the child to live a full life as a child and to realize his or her potential as a unique individual - to enable the child to develop as a social being through living and cooperating with others and so contribute to the good of society - to prepare the child for further education and lifelong learning.” ( DES 1999 page 7) “Key issues in primary education - quality in education - literacy and numeracy - developing a sense of Irish identity - the place of the Irish language in primary education - the spiritual dimension in life - the European and global dimensions of modern living - pluralism, a respect for diversity and the importance of tolerance - the function of the curriculum in contributing to equality and fairness of access in education - partnership in education - the role of information and communication technologies in enhancing learning - catering for children with special needs - the crucial role of early childhood education - facilitating the transition from primary to post-primary education - the role of the curriculum in establishing patterns of lifelong learning. ”(DES 1999 page 9) Our second level education system builds on the foundation from primary level.” “Second level education aims to provide a comprehensive, high-quality learning environment which aims to prepare individual students for higher or continuing education or for immediate entry into the workplace.” Second level education consists of a three-year Junior Cycle (lower secondary), followed by a two or three year Senior Cycle (upper secondary), depending on whether the optional Transition Year is taken. DES (2014). Learning capability: In Ireland he priorities for primary and post-primary education over the coming years are to: - promote quality, relevance and inclusiveness by supporting schools in developing an inclusive Environment for all learners:
  18. 18. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 18 School on the Cloud D3.1 - target interventions to address educational disadvantage - raise educational attainment - meet the needs of learners with special education needs - provide supports for newcomer children - progress the modernization agenda - enhance teacher education and professional development - promote ongoing curriculum development, school evaluation and quality improvement, and - provide high-quality school accommodation, administrative and financial supports.” (DES, 2011 page 15). Teachers use technology to: - Share lesson plans and teaching processes - repository - collaborative planning - communication Qualification: “The core values which underpin the work of the teaching profession in Ireland have been made explicit in the Teaching Council’s Codes of Professional Conduct for Teachers (2007). They relate to the educational experience, educational outcomes and relationships in teaching. The core values are: - commitment - quality of education - student-centered learning - responding to change - professional development - holistic development - cultural values - social justice, equality and inclusion - collegiality - collaboration - respect - care - co-operation.” Talent development: Will teachers get to design new units of study? Will they be offered an opportunity to collaborate around the idea of what these standards mean for their students? Will they have a chance to reflect on student progress, to refine their practice, and make meaningful instructional decisions? What must an iTeacher be able to do? An innovative teacher is creative, inspiring, charismatic and flexible. This teacher must be able to excite and enthuse their students. He/she should be able to help students reach their maximum potential, across a range of intelligence spans e.g. linguistic, musical, spatial etc. This teacher needs to keep abreast with new developments in ICT, educational research and contemporary issues in society. A teacher needs to remain interested and passionate about teaching. It is important that teachers and students work together to make learning a personal transaction and develop students' competencies and talents. Teaching demands creativity and innovation to engage and maintaining student engagement. Innovative teachers are willing to take calculated risks, anticipate and overcome obstacles and work around obstacles. Teachers must be action oriented, they should recognize opportunities to network, share, collaborate ideas and experiences. Teachers need to look ahead to benefits of new approaches and new technology. Innovative teaching is crucial to meet the educational needs of the new generations. Newly qualified teachers comments: Identify when a lesson is not working, the reason for it and alter it accordingly. ie Don’t bang your head against a brick wall, if the student is not understanding something, try every way around explaining it possible. Look at what the teacher is doing, not always what the student is failing to understand - what am I failing
  19. 19. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 19 School on the Cloud D3.1 to understand? Analyze, adjust and try again. Capable of finding practical applications and explanations of concepts that a student can identify with personally and pitch material at an appropriate level. The future skills and competences of a teacher: High skills in ICT, an interest in education and contemporary issues e.g. students should follow the daily news either through digital media or traditional media outlets, good levels of organizational and communication skills, should have a good knowledge of how to cope with stress successfully Skills and competencies in using different tools and technologies in their teaching and learning for example: Storytelling and Multimedia, Multi touch surfaces, Multimedia posters, E-books, Games, EPortfolios/binders, EBooks /Interactive textbooks, Interactive gaming, Assistive technology, Web-based platforms and competencies in Web- Based Research. Newly qualified teachers comments: Competent in ICT/technology to aid their teaching to make effective presentations that engage and support learning. Children can still learn simply through human interaction of course, but the emphasis on ICT competencies will increase. The values a teacher lives by in the future: Commitment to excellence in teaching and lifelong learning; commitment to equality of educational provision for all students in call and school. Newly qualified teachers comments: Hopefully to be fair, understanding, competent, thorough, prepared, present, organized, focused and compassionate. The future structures and organizations in which a teacher will work: Schools as reflective and learning organizations. Newly qualified teachers comments: Schools and universities will presumably remain in place for the foreseeable future. Perhaps teaching may be available online in a way that is not simply text files, but videos of the teacher to aid work outside of the classroom. Technological systems a future teacher will use/need: Technology used in the classroom in the future: Project- based Learning Management System / Learning platforms, Simulations and Models, Interactive Web Boards, E-ink technology. 3D visual technologies, Virtual and Augmented reality, Augmented reality eye wear, Future object embedded intelligence, Eye tracing, Reactive materials Immersive Virtual Worlds and ????? Will there be a killer app for education? What must a school be able to do so that future teachers can succeed in their new mission? Schools need to make teachers feel valued as professionals. Schools need to have excellent communication strategies and schools need to support teachers with personal CPD plans. Schools should create a cooperative, team-based organizational structure within which teachers work together to ensure each other's success. It is important that the school promotes a culture of sharing, cross-disciplinary collaboration, planning teams, reform, peer mentoring, master teachers, and self-evaluation. The school should focuses on specific goals and strategies tailored to their students and the educational system. Schools need to physically provide learning environment, software and hardware and encourage Professional Development, Mentoring, Training and Support in the use of technology tools. Schools need to provide support and communities of learners to enable a teacher to utilize technology. The consistent encouragement from school leadership is important and a strong leader is important to implement innovative and provide a positive culture of change in schools. Teachers should be kept informed about the school’s direction through periodic meetings, and should be consulted on decisions about ICT purchases and improvements to learning environments. What new structures and organizational forms will future schools have? Cross-disciplinary collaboration, planning teams, peer mentoring, master teachers and self-evaluation. What information must future schools have and produce? The learning analytics from a schools learning environment will provide valuable information on performance, participation and engagement. Technological systems a future school need? Software to enable Storytelling, Multimedia posters, E-books, Games, ePortfolios/binders, EBooks /Interactive textbooks, Interactive gaming.
  20. 20. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 20 School on the Cloud D3.1 Assistive technology to aid students with Special educational needs. Web-based platforms for Project-based Learning, Simulations & Models and Virtual & Augmented reality to support teaching and learning. What must educational authorities be able to do so that future teachers can succeed in their new mission? A recent Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) publication by Toner (2011) analyses the importance of boosting ‘skills for innovation’ as a key element in promoting innovation in the economy. Educational authorities should model best practice in education themselves, they should provide up to date CPD for schools and they should make a meaningful contribution to contemporary educational debates in the media, teachers magazines and through journals. Will current educational authorities remain the educational authorities in the future? Will there be more authorities (-levels)? Will they be interdependent? Trends towards globalization, marketization, technological advances, massification and diversification of the student body, as well as greater accountability to a wide range of stakeholders, are identified as drivers of this reform (Kogan and Hanney, 2000; Clark, 2004; Tapper and Palfreyman, 2010; De Zilma, 2010). Need for new technologies for Teaching and learning environment, more training of teachers CPD. More data collection, monitoring needed for greater accountability and transparency. What is needed in the Irish context is more coherence in education policy. In other words, more joined up thinking. Cross-government departmental thinking. What policies must be designed and supervised by future educational authorities? DES strategic plan for three-year period. Third-level has the Hunt report which outlines the policy environment until 2030 (DES, 2011). A Digital Strategy for School is in progress. NCCA updating language and literacy to take into account digital literacy. What will be the scope of the future tasks of educational authorities? Irish higher education is now at a point of transition HUNT/ DES policies undergoing transformation Modernization of the entire education system is underway. What will be the guiding values for future educational authorities? Driven very much by economic agenda. The link between participating in education and well-being including health and financial reward is seen as central to government education public policy. The represents a significant philosophical change where Ireland is moving from a ‘theocratic’ model of education (Lynch, 2013) to one based on servicing the needs of the knowledge economy. What will be the impact of the social context on the educational eco system? Innovation happens in environments where teachers collaborate, communicate, and the school provides a supportive culture allowing time for teachers to share and communicate. It must be supported by timely Professional Development. The national context is an important layer of the educational ecosystem. National policies support innovation but policies must be followed with guidelines and guidance to allow teachers to implement these policies. Training is essential to provide teachers with best practice and the opportunity to network. Technology provides a wealth of resources, but these must be curated to match subject areas and educational levels. Hopefully better educational provision for all. In what way is the digital gap between parents and children handled within the context of the school and what role will the teacher play? Parents are encouraged to actively get involved in their child’s learning. Technology can support this by allowing parents access to learning environments and providing additional resources and supports.
  21. 21. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 21 School on the Cloud D3.1 Italy: https://iteacherporto.wikispaces.com/Italy In what ways can the new technologies improve/change the core educational processes? Well-being and involvement: Today’s students, through communicative contexts of new media, not only acquire knowledge, make friendship, play, and express themselves but also develop their identities and negotiate their values. As teachers we have to take in account that these practices are radically different from those of older generations but produce the same effect: form a person. The advent of the Internet has created new virtual scenarios where young people "live" and meet each other. These new environments are changing the way we communicate, learn, work, play, socialize, and participate in civic life. Well-being is related to the individual capability and awareness to use this virtual social places. Who is inadequate automatically is excluded from the social life and the possibility to be successful. Since new abilities are required to students to handle the great flow of information passing by these new channels. However for a long time school curricula have emphasized only three basic skills: reading, writing and arithmetic, giving them priority in teaching. Since last years, all over Europe, revisions of the curricula have been introducing new skills and competences. Information literacy is entered in many curricula, but the road from introducing it to applying it seems to be still long in some countries. Many teachers, do not know how to promote the information- seeking skills associated with the Internet. Since there is a widespread myth that "digital natives" know everything about computers and surfing the web. Some teachers just leave their students alone at the computers or, at the opposite, teachers don't let them use the Internet at all because they do not know where to start teaching or what to do. Participatory culture Henry Jenkins, Director of the Comparative Media Studies Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, since 2006 has introduced the idea of a participatory culture promoted by the advent of Internet and social media. The participatory culture is: " a culture with relatively low barriers to artistic expression and civic engagement, strong support for creating and sharing one’s creations, and some type of informal mentorship whereby what is known by the most experienced is passed along to novices. A participatory culture is also one in which members believe their contributions matter, and feel some degree of social connection with one another (at the least they care what other people think about what they have created)" Jenkins underlines as schools have been slow to recognize this new participatory culture. Schools and afterschool programs must play more attention on fostering new media literacies. Media literacy is :" a set of cultural competencies and social skills that young people need in the new media landscape". Participatory culture and new literacies involve both traditional basic skills and new skills developed through collaboration and networking. The new skills listed by Jenkins include: "Play — the capacity to experiment with one’s surroundings as a form of problem-solving Performance — the ability to adopt alternative identities for the purpose of improvisation and discovery Simulation — the ability to interpret and construct dynamic models of real-world processes Appropriation — the ability to meaningfully sample and remix media content Multitasking — the ability to scan one’s environment and shift focus as needed to salient details. Distributed Cognition — the ability to interact meaningfully with tools that expand mental capacities Collective Intelligence — the ability to pool knowledge and compare notes with others toward a common goal Judgment — the ability to evaluate the reliability and credibility of different information sources Transmedia Navigation — the ability to follow the flow of stories and information across multiple modalities Networking — the ability to search for, synthesize, and disseminate information Negotiation — the ability to travel across diverse communities, discerning and respecting multiple perspectives, and grasping and following alternative norms". source -Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture:Media Education for the 21st Century- MacArthur Foundation) collaboration Promoting 21st century skills and new competencies requires a more systemic approach between everyone involved in helping students to become full participants in our society. Schools, afterschool associations and parents have distinctive roles to play to foster these skills. Learning capability: School nowadays is a "wide community" where many figures take part and interact. Each figure coming from outside (society and local agencies) is important and represents a stakeholder who can contribute to the choices of the school. However main decisions should be in charge to school staff (teachers
  22. 22. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 22 School on the Cloud D3.1 and head teachers) who have pedagogical thought. Mainly innovation has to fit with pedagogical purposes not just with trends and stakeholders' point of views. Information Communication Technology can help those students who have difficulties in writing, reading and calculating. E.g. speech synthesis, also known as text-to-speech (TTS), can be used to help people with dyslexia converting written texts into a speaking voice. Talent development: For a fair and sustainable society is important to ensure that all citizens have equal access to education but unfortunately still a too high number of young people drop out of school each year. EU’s plans aim to reduce the average drop-out rate to below 10% by 2020. Cutting the number of young people who leave education early is one of the most important aims of the Europe 2020 strategy as well as combating the problem of low reading and writing skills. Schools, policies and institutions have to acknowledge this issue and integrate it in their programs. Other comments: Innovation idea can look very different because the environment in which takes place is very different from school to school. What is suitable and works well in a school context can be unappropriated in another European school. It can be due to presence or absence of devices or teacher/head teacher training and background. The main characteristic of the paradigm of innovation should be flexibility What must an iTeacher be able to do? The future skills and competences of a teacher: In 2011 UNESCO published the "UNESCO ICTCompetency Framework For Teacher . It underlines that "it is not enough for teachers to have ICT competencies and be able to teach them to their students. Teachers need to be able to help the students become collaborative, creative learners, problem solving, through using ICT so they will be effective citizens and members of the workforce". Teacher should know and master a wide set of digital tools that allow to integrate technologies into the learning environment. The values a teacher lives by in the future: The use of new technologies in education implies not only new values as active citizenship, cross-cultural understanding, but also new teacher roles and new pedagogies and new approaches to teaching. The teacher plays a central role in being a tutor who guides the students so that they can develop and become both active participants in the learning environments of the school, in society and in the wide web based community. The future structures and organizations in which a teacher will work: Nowadays most part of our work, social activities and our private life have moved online. Only teaching is still in the classroom. In the next future scenarios we should move teaching into the cloud to align it to the real life and social evolution. The information a future teacher will need/have: Our society is characterized to be an information society, where information is a continuous flow always changing and increasing. In this kind of society knowledge and information quickly become obsolete, since what is important and useful today couldn't be tomorrow. The teacher should develop capability to be able to access on demand every kind of information required by his/her profession. Technological systems a future teacher will use/need: Technological systems need to be evolving systems, periodically reviewed as technology evolves and as new knowledge develops. What must a school be able to do so that future teachers can succeed in their new mission? What new structures and organizational forms will future schools have? The Web 2.0 offers large opportunities to use new tools to interact, share, edit information and create innovative learning environments. The European School Net has created a " Future Classroom Lab" in Brussels. It is a model of a well-equipped, reconfigurable, teaching and learning space. It has been thought as a “Living Lab’ showing how ICT can be implemented in schools to renew and re-think the education process. http://www.eun.org/ The future school lab can be considered a good example how should be next school environment, however that model can't be follow in each European country due to a lack of infrastructures. The "Survey of Schools: ICT in Education Final Study Report BENCHMARKING ACCESS, USE AND ATTITUDES TO
  23. 23. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 23 School on the Cloud D3.1 TECHNOLOGY IN EUROPE’S SCHOOLS " shows there is large variation of ratio computer per students between European countries. The survey also shows the wide difference keeps regarding the use of virtual learning environments and the ratio students- Interactive White Boards. ICT use is improving in all European schools but several obstacles remain. The biggest obstacle to ICT use in many countries is insufficient ICT equipment, so the use in the classroom for learning is infrequent. table source:https://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/sites/digital-agenda/files/KK-31-13-401-EN-N.pdf What information must future schools have and produce? School should have access to every kind of information useful to give more opportunity to their student to be successful in their own life. A flow of information always available on demand and accessible anywhere. "It takes a village to raise a child" where the village is a global connected village. Sugata Mitra is building a new model of school and Self Organized Learning Environment using the opportunity offered by the Cloud. This model aims to offer a chance of being educated to poor children in the underdeveloped areas of the world. http://www.ted.com/talks/sugata_mitra_build_a_school_in_the_cloud What will be the core values a future school must embrace? The American research "Hanging Out, Messing Around, and Geeking Out, Kids Living and Learning with New Media" Mizuko Ito leaded by MIMI ITO has studied and mapped different youth practices and the social and cultural ecologies that contextualize these practices. The research underlines that youth grown up[...]immersed in new digital tools and networks are engaged in an unprecedented exploration of language, games, social interaction, problem solving, and self-directed activity that leads to diverse forms of learning. These diverse forms of learning are reflected in expressions of identity, how individuals express independence and creativity, and in their ability to learn, exercise judgment, and think systematically. Values and norms of education, are being changed by a new landscape of media and communications where youth are central. The "always connected generation" lives in virtual environment and practices: sharing, peer learning, creativity, authoring. These new ways while being practiced became values that are applied by youth in relationships and judgments. School has to take in account and embrace these new values and add them to the traditional range. **http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/hanging-out-messing-around-and-geeking-out** Technological systems a future school need? A good example can be the above quoted "FUTURE CLASSROOM LAB" IN Brussels. What must educational authorities be able to do so that future teachers can succeed in their new mission? Will current educational authorities remain the educational authorities in the future? Will there be more authorities (-levels)? Will they be interdependent? Surely innovation process requires qualified leadership from
  24. 24. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 24 School on the Cloud D3.1 the governments, and all responsible of the education systems but each EU country has different organization, resources, infrastructures and appreciation so it is difficult to define a hypothesis that can fit well for all. What policies must be designed and supervised by future educational authorities? Policies related to: - new school buildings - funds to buy technology and devices - curricula revision - furniture inside school - national plan of training for teachers What will be the scope of the future tasks of educational authorities? - ensure equal opportunity to everyone to reach success at school - reduce the drop out What will be the impact of the social context on the educational eco system? In what way is the digital gap between parents and children handled within the context of the school and what role will the teacher play? The "always connected generation" needs support by school to improve its awareness that doesn't rise automatically by surfing the web but requires reflection and support. Sometime happens the same for parents who, due to a lack of competencies to understand their world, aren't enough aware of what they children do . School has to support and train also parents in their educator role. In which manner can a teacher follow and adapt to the quick social technical innovations within the educational process? Learning can no longer be seen as to acquire knowledge just at school but learning should be seen as something that takes place on an on-going basis from our daily interactions with the world around us for all life during. Teacher has to update his /her knowledge continually as continually society and technologies change. Teacher can update competencies from formal learning, as in service training organized by institutions, or informal learning as a wide offer of MOOC, or self-directed learning acquiring information from the Web. Poland: https://iteacherporto.wikispaces.com/Poland In what ways can the new technologies improve/change the core educational processes? New technologies help to put and idea of personalized learning into practice, thus support development of individual talents of each pupil. What must an iTeacher be able to do? Few days ago I saw really nice picture in the Internet - the profile of a modern teacher (http://www.coetail.com/wayfaringpath/2014/10/14/the-profile-of-a-modern-teacher/)
  25. 25. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 25 School on the Cloud D3.1 Modern generation of educators should move from the role of experts in some specific area (geography, biology, science, history) to the role of trainers and coaches of their students. They should become leaders inspiring their students to acquire knowledge, develop their skills, set goals concerning future career, etc. I share the idea of dr Russell Qualia from Qualia Institute who emphasizing the role of an educator-leader/coach who's able to build feeling of self-worth and self-confidence in students, show them purpose of education process as well as foster their engagement (http://www.qisa.org/framework/principles.jsp) According to the above mentioned situation teachers need to strengthen in particular their social skills. They are experts in their areas but need to build up ability to lead students, motivate them and attract to education. What must a school be able to do so that future teachers can succeed in their new mission? School has to play a role of technical operator - provide fast and undisturbed access to technologies (Internet in particular). We cannot think about 'cloudy' school without this. Romania: https://iteacherporto.wikispaces.com/Romania In what ways can the new technologies improve/change the core educational processes? Well-being and involvement: Students need to trust that their certification will provide them a good future. It can give the educational system the force to adapt with a society/ that is always changing, that isn't predictable anymore. Learning capability: Personalized education; more option to be taken into consideration: a more flexible curricula. In a system that is more or less conservative, new technologies can be an opportunity to have the chance to do what you are more interested in. Qualification: An evaluation mean that is less subjective. Knowing and being more aquatinted with new technologies give students more chances to find their own way. Talent development: Creativity linked with much larger liberty of expressing themselves. Increases the importance of discovering what the students really need. Other comments: In a way or another in every countries these are the key elements but what makes it to be different it is the different importance given to them. Our educational system even if it have been transformed entirely it is still more formal and conservative. I don't consider it to be necessarily a week point, because sometimes to avoid mistake it is better to be calm and keep your own time but sometimes this kind of thinking
  26. 26. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 26 School on the Cloud D3.1 may cause you to lose the start. I think that because of the economical background we seem to give more importance to qualification, we don't always have time to be creative and we accept or life made us to accept that well-being may remain an ideal. What must an iTeacher be able to do? The future skills and competences of a teacher: e.g. the way a teacher predicts and solves new technical and educational problems. The values a teacher lives by in the future: More or less they are the same because our duty is not only to offer information but to help children to discover their own values and to help them to understand how to learn by themselves. The future structures and organizations in which a teacher will work: They will offer more freedom to teacher and to his students. The information a future teacher will need/have: It is certain that we'll need more information or maybe we have to know how we can get this new information. Technological systems a future teacher will use/need: Something that is updated. What must a school be able to do so that future teachers can succeed in their new mission? What new structures and organizational forms will future schools have? They have to receive the possibility to create the structure they need. What information must future schools have and produce? They should have the chance to have digital books. What will be the core values a future school must embrace? A right balance between tradition and modernity. Technological systems a future school need? More computers. What must educational authorities be able to do so that future teachers can succeed in their new mission? Will current educational authorities remain the educational authorities in the future? Will there be more authorities (-levels)? Will they be interdependent? Let's hope they will be shared not only by central authorities but by local one as well. What policies must be designed and supervised by future educational authorities? A policy in which student's real needs are central: less theoretical and more practical. What will be the scope of the future tasks of educational authorities? To allow teachers and students to have more options in choosing what they want and what they really need to teach/learn. What will be the guiding values for future educational authorities? Flexibility and adaptability. What will be the impact of the social context on the educational eco system? In what way is the digital gap between parents and children handled within the context of the school and what role will the teacher play? The so called "parents ‘school" is only at the beginning in Romania so it is difficult for teacher to help parents to overcome this gap. We have to remind as well that even if in Romania we have one of the highest speed of the internet , we have a lot of people living in the countryside so in certain area we have a lack of digital technology. However teacher s have to adapt to what is new so that in the future its role can increase. In which manner can a teacher follow and adapt to the quick social technical innovations within the educational process? As I have just said teachers through their formation are always opened to what involve knowledge. So they are open to what is new and to what helps them to be better teachers. How does a teacher handle scientific criticism regarding technical innovation in education? It is true that not everything is new have to be taken without criticism. But it is also true that we know that knowledge is spread in many things and that there are many ways to share it. What ways does a teacher have to address the Government about the facilities he/she needs, now and in the near future? Now he can address the Government only through his manager or as a part of a trade union. Maybe it will be better if the power of the government are smaller and the power of the local authorities will be bigger.
  27. 27. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 27 School on the Cloud D3.1 Spain: https://iteacherporto.wikispaces.com /Spain In what ways can the new technologies improve/change the core educational processes? Students of the Masters in Teacher Training: sharing information, collaboration, acquiring knowledge, interacting, building a culture of trust, pedagogical integration, … Well-being and involvement: healthcare policy, anti-bullying policy, organizing student council, parent participation by a virtual interactive wall, using social red web 2.0. Learning capability: determining plan of care, executing care, communication with stakeholders, .. by using multiple intelligences, guiding students deal with learning obstacles. Qualification: organizing the act of teaching (choosing content, choosing didactical approaches), organizing evaluation (choosing evaluation instruments, evaluating, giving feedback to students), certifying and qualifying students (examination board meetings, helping students choose a direction in studies and/or profession), .. by active learning that enhance own inquiry and discovery, so from a handout seek for themselves the solution (inductive method) using TIC (map, virtual globes, digital libraries). Talent development: portfolio, helping students choose a direction in studies and/or profession based on their talents, organizing extracurricular activities, trip professional virtual visits (museums, places, libraries, art project google) by using of multiple intelligences helps all students succeed, eight abilities that he held to meet these criteria: musical–rhythmic, visual-spatial, verbal linguistic, logical–mathematical, bodily–kinesthetic, interpersonal, intrapersonal, and naturalistic, group tutoring, individual tutoring, practice: google earth, google map, art project, google scholar, google book, digital libraries, archives, skills, making activities and practices. Other comments: It is a complement: the importance of student’s intrinsic motivation: https://www.learnboost.com/blog/10-super-quick-and-easy-ways-to-intrinsically-motivate-your-students/, flipped classroom, can help. Students receive guidance and work with images together with theory from outside the classroom, while in the actual classes they can resolve any issues or perform collaborative work that allows them to set the contents of the subject. What must an iTeacher be able to do? The future skills and competences of a teacher: The way a teacher predicts and solves new technical and educational problems. The values a teacher lives by in the future: Skills in technology. The future structures and organizations in which a teacher will work: Learning along the way Professional Development by and for Teachers. The information a future teacher will need/have: Human and Natural Values. Technological systems a future teacher will use/need: For me the future of technology in education is the cloud. Forget devices, the future of education technology is all about the cloud and anywhere access. In the future, teaching and learning is going to be social. It is a really interesting question and one that I am required to think about all the time. By its very nature, technology changes at a fast pace and making it accessible to pupils, teachers and other stakeholders is an ongoing challenge. What must a school be able to do so that future teachers can succeed in their new mission? What new structures and organizational forms will future schools have? Structures interdisciplinary, … What information must future schools have and produce? New information resources online. What will be the core values a future school must embrace? The future is about access, anywhere learning and collaboration, both locally and globally. Teaching and learning is going to be social. Schools of the future could have a traditional cohort of students, as well as online only students who live across the country or even the world. Things are already starting to move this way with the emergence of massive open online courses (MOOCs). Technological systems a future school need? Schools will need a fast robust internet connection. Infrastructure is paramount to the the future of technology in education. Using open data and preparing open data for students. What must educational authorities be able to do so that future teachers can succeed in their new mission? Will current educational authorities remain the educational authorities in the future? Will there be more authorities (-levels)? Will they be interdependent? Depend on the ideology of the school and the programmed values.Although they are marked by the education law of each country. What information and systems are required for these authorities? What we do know, is that it will need the cloud. Schools and other educational institutions will need to futureproof their infrastructure the best they can.
  28. 28. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 28 School on the Cloud D3.1 What will be the impact of the social context on the educational eco system? In what way is the digital gap between parents and children handled within the context of the school and what role will the teacher play? Mediating . Digital gap between parents and sons. In which manner can a teacher follow and adapt to the quick social technical innovations within the educational process? Lifelong learning. Shared applications and documents on the cloud, such as Google Apps will allow for more social lessons. How often do students get an opportunity to collaborate productively using technology in the classroom? It isn't always easy. However, students working on documents together using Google Apps is easy. They could be in the same room or in different countries. These are all good skills for students to have. Of course, these collaborative tools are also very useful for teachers. I for one have worked on several projects where these tools have lets me work with people across the country. Some of which I have never met. How does a teacher handle scientific criticism regarding technical innovation in education? Rather than being 'taught' students can learn independently and in their own way. There is also a massive amount of resources online that students can find and use themselves, without the help of the teacher. This of course means the role of the teacher will change. the teacher is a guide for the students in the context technology. Teachers can use the cloud to set, collect and grade work online. Students will have instant access to grades, comments and work via a computer, smartphone or tablet. Many schools are already doing this. Plus, services such as the educational social network Edmodo offer this for free. What ways does a teacher have to address the Government about the facilities he/she needs, now and in the near future? The cloud can also encourage independent learning. Teachers could adopt a flipped classroom approach more often. Students will take ownership of their own learning. Teachers can put resources for students online for students to use. These could be videos, documents, audio podcasts or interactive images. All of these resources can be accessed via a student's computer, smartphone or tablet. As long as they have an internet connection either via Wi-Fi, 3G or 4G they are good to go. UK: https://iteacherporto.wikispaces.com/UK In what ways can the new technologies improve/change the core educational processes? Well-being and involvement: Geocapability: Geocapability is a term linked to geography education and is proposed as an international approach to articulating the aims, purposes and outcomes of an effective curriculum. It is derived from the ‘capabilities approach’ to human welfare economics, originally espoused by economist Amartya Sen and political philosopher Martha Nussbaum. Rather than discrete skills, capability rests on acquiring and developing a range of ‘functioning’s’ that contribute to human autonomy in thought and action. (See the GeoCapabilities Project http://www.geocapabilities.org.) ICT offers a more challenging, and potentially far-reaching opportunity in the pre-service and professional development in the teacher education system [1]. 1. Borko, H., J. Whitcomb, and D. Liston. 2009. Wicked problems and other thoughts on issues of technology and teacher learning. Journal of Teacher Education 60 (1): 3-7. Learning capability: Geocapability and education: Key advocates of the geocapabilities approach take it as axiomatic that young people’s geocapability can be enhanced through formal education. The main reason for this is that the school curriculum provides young people with access to specialized, disciplinary knowledge. The capabilities approach to curriculum thinking recognizes the power of specialized knowledge enabling individuals and societies to think ‘the unthinkable’ and ‘the not yet thought’ [3]. The idea of ‘powerful knowledge’ is used as driver of curriculum thinking and construction to develop the opportunity for young people to acquire the conceptual ideas of a discipline that enable them to reflect on and move beyond the particulars of their everyday experience. [4]). In these terms, ‘powerful knowledge’ can provide principles to be considered when designing and justifying a geography curriculum enabling a theoretically-informed relational understanding of people and places in the world; and a propensity and disposition to think about alternative social, economic and environmental futures [5] A geocapabilities approach to education stimulates teachers to consider the role of geography in helping young people reach their full human potential by providing the intellectual means for visioning ourselves on planet earth. 3. Geographical Association (2009) A Different View : a manifesto for the Geographical Association 4. Solem, M. Lambert, D. & Tani, S.( 2013) GeoCapabilities: Toward an International Framework for Researching the Purposes and Values of Geography Education. Review of International Geographical Education Online. 3 (3), 204-219. 5. Young, M. (2008) Bringing knowledge back in. London: Routledge Young, M. (2008) Bringing knowledge back in. London: Routledge
  29. 29. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 29 School on the Cloud D3.1 Traditional face-to-face professional development has a limited reach; only teachers who are able to access these opportunities locally can participate. For these reasons, alternative methods of professional development have become more appealing in recent years with the widespread use of online learning and Internet technology and video [1]. Such modes of delivery are also helpful if the goal is to internationalize approaches to professional development. Thus a theme like "Technology and the individual" would be important in understanding learning capability. Borko, H., J. Whitcomb, and D. Liston. 2009. Wicked problems and other thoughts on issues of technology and teacher learning. Journal of Teacher Education 60 (1): 3-7. Qualification: A capabilities approach may provide a mechanism for dismantling historically persistent structural issues that have limited teacher preparation. At present, teachers have few opportunities during their initial training and careers to engage the perspectives of peers and experts in different countries - they may indeed be isolated in their own institution. ICT would open up such opportunities for exchange between experts (teachers) in different subjects. Talent development: Geocapability posits that human capability is deprived without deep descriptive ‘world knowledge’ so that individuals can extend their thinking beyond the immediate ‘everyday’ experience of their surroundings. The ‘world knowledge’ envisioned by the geocapabilities approach is not just a collection of memorized facts about locations and places, or a set of competences/skills to be achieved; it is a way of seeing and understanding the world from multiple perspectives through the ‘systematicity' provided by key geographical concepts [1].giving a propensity and disposition to think about alternative social, economic and environmental futures [2] The Geocapabilities approach draws from the idea of ‘powerful knowledge’ developed by the educationist Michael Young to link it to conceptual work on curriculum and contemporary debates on the sociology of knowledge, and to re-focus on the aims and thinking of geography as a discipline for enhancing an individual’s capacity to contextualize the world, take responsibility for their lives, to make decisions and act according to what they believe is right. 1. Lambert, D, & Morgan, J. (2010) Teaching Geography 11-18: A Conceptual Approach. Maidenhead: Open University Press. p.64. 2. Hoyningen-Huene, P. (2013) Systematicity: The Nature of Science(Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Science). Oxford: Oxford University Press. It's about not having limits - teachers tend to set boundaries whereas technologies open them up. The role of education in society: Who are educationalists responsible to¸ What purpose does education have - economic? social? knowledge? or? Should help deal with (envision) futures. Should enable faster knowledge spread. Other comments: Challenge to envisage a whole system approach and integrate answers for all components. Excellence, high quality, valued - clear vision of what education is and should be, Open - great connections to societal processes, Selective - the best become teachers, Multi-disciplinary, problem-based, Not based on targets Teachers as professionals. What must an iTeacher be able to do? The future skills and competences of a teacher: Be responsive to new media, be up to date - by using for example social media, be able to integrate new technologies, see the spatial citizenship competence model at http://www.academia.edu/4046841/Spatial_Citizenship._The_concept_of_competence The values a teacher lives by in the future: Engaged in public real world processes, see the spatial citizenship competence model at http://www.academia.edu/4046841/Spatial_Citizenship._The_concept_of_competence The future structures and organizations in which a teacher will work: Teachers will be experts - in their core subject area and be able to draw on information and expertise from elsewhere - using Web 2.0. The information a future teacher will need/have: Teachers will have access to everything - like the Digital Earth concept foreseen by Al Gore. They will need to have the expertise to draw on this information and to use it to advance knowledge, not just reproduce meaningless exercises. Implies project based, interdisciplinary activities working on complex questions. Technological systems a future teacher will use/need: Blend of technologies - what they feel most comfortable with. Will see more miniaturization, more integration into everyday actions and activities.
  30. 30. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 30 School on the Cloud D3.1 Will become even more seamless. What must a school be able to do so that future teachers can succeed in their new mission? What new structures and organizational forms will future schools have? Become more open to the outside world, become more like the real world . What information must future schools have and produce? As described above - access to everything - understanding therefore the good, positive aspects and less good..., schools should contribute to information like environmental research, involvement in Citizen Science for example contributing data through projects. What will be the core values a future school must embrace? Mirroring society. Technological systems a future school need? Open, cheap, interactive, integrated. What must educational authorities be able to do so that future teachers can succeed in their new mission? Will current educational authorities remain the educational authorities in the future? Will there be more authorities (-levels)? Will they be interdependent? Reduce bureaucracy, trust teachers and teacher education as professionals, be more decentralized - i.e. remove layers and barriers, establish clear education vision, teachers and organizations work within this. What policies must be designed and supervised by future educational authorities? Should just focus on the vision and setting 'meta level' targets. What will be the scope of the future tasks of educational authorities? Understanding futures, establishing visions for education with societal, national contexts. What will be the guiding values for future educational authorities? Will depend on the culture and needs of society/country, clear vision of what education should achieve. See geocapabilities approach. What information and systems are required for these authorities? Must avoid big brother syndrome, need to have trust. What will be the impact of the social context on the educational eco system? In what way is the digital gap between parents and children handled within the context of the school and what role will the teacher play? There will not be a digital gap in the future (i.e. in a generation). Changes now will be reduce this as pupils today become parents. In which manner can a teacher follow and adapt to the quick social technical innovations within the educational process? Have to understand the value. Easy to implement in small steps. Problems arise when forced to implement or insufficient non-technical training takes place. How does a teacher handle scientific criticism regarding technical innovation in education? Should be professional - i.e. understand they are not the source of all knowledge - teachers as learners. What ways does a teacher have to address the Government about the facilities he/she needs, now and in the near future? Should be open forum - opportunities for government / Ministries to understand and have dialogue with teachers. Use the opportunities to advise those in positions of decision making.
  31. 31. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 31 School on the Cloud D3.1 First submeeting Porto, November 7th – 8th 2014 In preparation of the very first gathering with the workgroup iTeacher, we created an introductive assignment which was send to every partner, using the cloud-service. We encouraged our partners to do this assignment in group, working together per country. As a result, some interesting ideas about the future role of teachers, specifically in relation to modern technology, were suggested. During the gathering we used a symbaloo in order to store all the assignments and results in one place and create links to them. Off course the introduction assignment is also part of the symbaloo. All of the above, as well as the cloud-tools we have been using so far, can be found by clicking the following link: http://www.symbaloo.com/mix/iteachersoc-porto We will continue to use this symbaloo in all future gatherings of the workgroup iTeacher. Topics fort his gathering were the following: 1. What is an iTeacher? 2. How to be an iTeacher? 3. What do you believe will be the main changes to school education in the future?
  32. 32. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 32 School on the Cloud D3.1 What is an iTeacher? To define an iTeacher, we worked with the primary process of education, by Flanders Synergy: First of all we agreed on 10 keywords for each primary process of education. This way there would be no misunderstandings about the different processes and there meaning. Then, we created a tagxedo (word cloud) containing these 10 keywords and posted this on the lino-wall of each primary process. After that we discussed in what ways new technologies can improve or change the education process of the 4 primary processes. Some very concrete answers were formulated and also posted on the lino. Next on the agenda was a group discussion about the competencies and training needs of the iTeacher with Trello. Four small groups were formed for this assignment. A list of competences was given to choose from, but adding new competences was also an option. Goal of the assignment was to define what competences teachers need in the different stages of their jobs, namely the innovative teacher, the starting teacher and the current teacher. To roundup the topic “what is an iTeacher” we had a plenary discussion about the lino-walls as well as the competences.
  33. 33. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 33 School on the Cloud D3.1 How to be an iTeacher? It is good to define what an iTeacher is, but how can you be one? To answer this question we organized a brainstorming session in groups by using a carrousel system. This means that we had three rounds in which 2 placemats were to be filled out by each group. Using this system allowed everyone to express their ideas about every subject related. In the final round every group was able to continue with the ideas all other groups had added to the placemats. As all the participants were very enthusiastic a lot of great input was given during this brainstorming session. What do you believe will be the main changes to school education in the future? As the future evolution of school education has a great impact on how to be a teacher, we also worked on an additional assignment from the workgroup iFuture. They asked us to state our opinion in terms of the role of cloud computing as it relates to the learning needs, objectives and strategies in order to enhance the activities the learner is good at and improve those that the learner face difficulties with. Also for this assignment we decided to work in small groups. Every group watched a movie in which a situation was portrayed in relation to a pupil, a student, a manager and a teacher. Conclusions about these movies were presented for the whole workgroup iTeacher. You can consult our findings in the symbaloo. After two days of hard work, fun and lots of inspiring ideas we met with the workgroup iLearner, who were also present in Porto. Both workgroups presented their findings of the last two days to each other. As each workgroups is partly depending on the other, this stage of the process is very important and necessary. In addition to the presentations a lot of time for discussion and sharing of ideas was foreseen.
  34. 34. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 34 School on the Cloud D3.1 Conclusion: The main conclusion of the gathering was the following: The iTeacher is a concept rather than a person. It is about being an innovative teacher, which can only by achieved by cooperating with other people. For this reason the workgroup iTeacher will put his focus on the team and its competences instead of the individual. It will be a challenge to process this within a cloudconcept. During the gathering we used a lot of cloud tools in order to get to know there added value, find out there flaws and integrate the cloud within the workgroup. This way we will be able to use cloud solutions in our future work with the group. Based on the input of the introductive assignment and the 1st submeeting the cloud will be used to cooperate and finalize the deliverables. The next gathering of the workgroup iTeacher will take place in Madrid in the beginning of 2016.
  35. 35. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 35 School on the Cloud D3.1 Results of the first submeeting What is an iTeacher? http://linoit.com/users/SoCiTeacher/canvases/well-being%20and%20involvement http://linoit.com/users/SoCiTeacher/canvases/learning%20capability
  36. 36. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 36 School on the Cloud D3.1 http://linoit.com/users/SoCiTeacher/canvases/qualification http://linoit.com/users/SoCiTeacher/canvases/talent%20development
  37. 37. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 37 School on the Cloud D3.1 Conclusion http://linoit.com/users/SoCiTeacher/canvases/What%20is%20an%20iTeacher%3F Competences of an iTeacher https://trello.com/b/DVqdQSlr/group-1
  38. 38. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 38 School on the Cloud D3.1 https://trello.com/b/qXfH79oI/group-2 https://trello.com/b/WpvWMwXz/group-3
  39. 39. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 39 School on the Cloud D3.1 https://trello.com/b/QIUTPjHg/group-4 Conclusion https://trello.com/b/E2Ab5YRb/final-conclusion
  40. 40. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 40 School on the Cloud D3.1 How to be an iTeacher? http://www.spiderscribe.net/app/?94eba68b4e03d8f90b2e0355b2d4b39b
  41. 41. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 41 School on the Cloud D3.1 The presentations A presentation on the impact of cloud based teaching on teachers https://sway.com/rbxChB5UW7A7DWt7
  42. 42. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 42 School on the Cloud D3.1
  43. 43. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 43 School on the Cloud D3.1
  44. 44. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 44 School on the Cloud D3.1
  45. 45. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 45 School on the Cloud D3.1 A presentation on the impact of cloud based teaching on teacher education, to get a diploma, during life time. http://www.tiki-toki.com/timeline/entry/477778/Opleidingsbehoefte Click on the circle at the bottom left to see the time line in 3D. A glossary https://sway.com/sPhg_-7xBr2ifdNe
  46. 46. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 46 School on the Cloud D3.1 A presentation of cloud based teaching with the use of social media and mobile devices. What is an iClassRoom? http://youtu.be/OEQbSUpa0nc The school is part of the mediatized world. The class cannot ignore the digital technology. Each class must integrate and evolve in the direction of an iclassroom. This forasmuch the development of media literacy and media awareness with the school staff and students. Therefore, the school must develop a vision, both for didactic and pedagogical purpose. This according to the principles of ICT: interactive, context, applicable. At school, rules and agreements are made, for example in the form of a netiquette. The iclassroom contains a virtual and physical space with the goal to connect the classroom with the world. Why? 1. For the INDIVIDUAL PUPIL:  DIFFERENTIATION  PERSONAL CURRICULUM  CUSTOMIZATION  OWNER OF OWN LEARNING 2. For the GROUP of CLASS:  EXCHANGE OF KNOWLEDGE  FUN TO LEARN  LEARNING TOGETHER 3. For the SCHOOL:  ONE BIG CREATIVE SPACE  INNOVATION  INCLUSION 4. For the WORLD:  GETTING TO KNOW EACH OTHER  EMBRACE DIVERSITY  A MOUSECLICK AWAY NO WALLS, NO BOUNDARIES, ALL NEIGHBOURS AND UNIQUE PEOPLE!
  47. 47. 543221–LLP–1–2013–1–GR-KA3- KA3NW 47 School on the Cloud D3.1 A presentation on Innovation-recommendations, based on a vision https://www.thinglink.com/scene/657132449456717826 The (virtual) world in transition Education and iTeacher are not separated from the changes in the world, especially the virtual world. The social changes that relate to ICT integration in education are mainly situated on three major axes: - Knowledge sharing, experiences, emotions, investment… - Place and time independent work/learn: relaxing… - The knowledge society Within these three core concepts and their cutting edges we can situate and frame various new concepts.

    Be the first to comment

    Login to see the comments

  • isaacbuzo

    Jul. 4, 2015

Sofie De Cupere (editor), School on the Cloud, ICT Key Action 3 European Project Participants in Working Group 2 (i-Teacher) have prepared presentations on the impact of Cloud-based teaching, teacher education, training and on the relationship between the “use of Cloud-based teaching” and the mobile, connected and social media use in i-classroom. Discussion and analysis is focused on the identification of training needs for teachers and trainers and produce a guide to Cloud-based terminology. The issues associated with mainstreaming innovation has been discussed and a series of recommendations resulted to a model of vision and practical strategic outlines. These are published as a training needs manifesto for educational organizations and for decision makers.

Views

Total views

2,220

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

507

Actions

Downloads

28

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

1

×