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Landmarks of Maxilla
Dr. Yumna
Lecturer
Dental Hygiene and Technology
Introduction
• Aim of a prosthodontist is not only the meticulous
replacement of what is missing, but also preservation
of...
Maxilla
Intra oral Landmarks of Maxilla
1. Limiting structures
2. Supporting structures
– Primary Stress bearing area
– Secondary ...
1. Limiting
Structures
1. Limiting Structures
• These are the sites that will guide us in having
optimum extension of the denture so as to engage...
1. Limiting Structures
• Encroaching on these structures will result in the
– Dislodgment of the dentures
– Soreness of th...
1. Limiting Structures
• Labial frenum
• Labial vestibule
• Buccal frenum
• Buccal vestibule
• Hamular notch
• Posterior s...
Frenum and Vestibule
• Fold of mucous
membrane at the midline
• Contains no muscles
• Properly relieved
• Vestibule is the...
Hamular Notch
• Also called pterygomaxillary notch
• Distal extension of denture
• Identify the palatal seal area
Posterior Seal Area
• An imaginary line drawn across the palate that marks
the beginning of the soft palate when the patie...
Posterior Seal area
2. Supporting
Structures
2. Supporting Structures
• Masticatory forces produce quite a pressure on the
underlying structures
• Every structure bene...
2. Supporting Structures
• They are divided into
– Primary stress bearing area
– Secondary stress bearing area
Primary Stress bearing area
• These are the areas which are most capable of taking the
masticatory load providing a proper...
Primary Stress bearing area
• Horizontal portion of the hard palate, lateral to the
midline
• Slopes of the residual
alveo...
Secondary Stress bearing area
• Areas that resist the lateral forces of occlusion and
can aid the resistance to the vertic...
Secondary Stress bearing area
3. Relief
Areas
Relief Areas
• Areas which have fragile structures
• They can resorb easily
• They should be relieved to avoid trauma
Relief Areas
• They include
– Incisive papilla
– Median palatine raphe
– Fovea palatine
Incisive papilla
• Projection on the palate near the incisors
Median palatine raphe
Fovea palatine
• Area of compressible tissue
located anteriorly to the
vibrating line
• Tissue in this area is very thin
Landmarks of maxilla
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Landmarks of maxilla

Landmarks of maxilla, its relief supporting and limiting structures

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Landmarks of maxilla

  1. 1. Landmarks of Maxilla Dr. Yumna Lecturer Dental Hygiene and Technology
  2. 2. Introduction • Aim of a prosthodontist is not only the meticulous replacement of what is missing, but also preservation of what is present • Complete denture must function in harmony with the remaining natural tissues. • So for the success thorough knowledge of the anatomical structures is must
  3. 3. Maxilla
  4. 4. Intra oral Landmarks of Maxilla 1. Limiting structures 2. Supporting structures – Primary Stress bearing area – Secondary Stress bearing area 3. Relief area
  5. 5. 1. Limiting Structures
  6. 6. 1. Limiting Structures • These are the sites that will guide us in having optimum extension of the denture so as to engage maximum surface area without encroaching upon the muscle actions
  7. 7. 1. Limiting Structures • Encroaching on these structures will result in the – Dislodgment of the dentures – Soreness of the area – Decreased retention, stability and support
  8. 8. 1. Limiting Structures • Labial frenum • Labial vestibule • Buccal frenum • Buccal vestibule • Hamular notch • Posterior seal area
  9. 9. Frenum and Vestibule • Fold of mucous membrane at the midline • Contains no muscles • Properly relieved • Vestibule is the area bounded between cheek and alveolar ridge
  10. 10. Hamular Notch • Also called pterygomaxillary notch • Distal extension of denture • Identify the palatal seal area
  11. 11. Posterior Seal Area • An imaginary line drawn across the palate that marks the beginning of the soft palate when the patient says ‘aaah’ • It extends from one hamular notch to the other • Lie usually 2mm in front of fovea palatine
  12. 12. Posterior Seal area
  13. 13. 2. Supporting Structures
  14. 14. 2. Supporting Structures • Masticatory forces produce quite a pressure on the underlying structures • Every structure beneath the denture cannot take such stress hence we need to know about the areas which can bear the stress
  15. 15. 2. Supporting Structures • They are divided into – Primary stress bearing area – Secondary stress bearing area
  16. 16. Primary Stress bearing area • These are the areas which are most capable of taking the masticatory load providing a proper support to the denture • Some desired properties of these areas are – Sufficient fibrous connective tissue – Presence of cortical bone – Absence of structures which can get harm due top stress
  17. 17. Primary Stress bearing area • Horizontal portion of the hard palate, lateral to the midline • Slopes of the residual alveolar ridge
  18. 18. Secondary Stress bearing area • Areas that resist the lateral forces of occlusion and can aid the resistance to the vertical forces • They have increased vascularity • These areas are – Rugae – Maxillary Tuberosity
  19. 19. Secondary Stress bearing area
  20. 20. 3. Relief Areas
  21. 21. Relief Areas • Areas which have fragile structures • They can resorb easily • They should be relieved to avoid trauma
  22. 22. Relief Areas • They include – Incisive papilla – Median palatine raphe – Fovea palatine
  23. 23. Incisive papilla • Projection on the palate near the incisors
  24. 24. Median palatine raphe
  25. 25. Fovea palatine • Area of compressible tissue located anteriorly to the vibrating line • Tissue in this area is very thin

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