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Facilitation Foundations - A Guide to Effective Agile Meetings

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Facilitation Foundations is a presentation that has been given at multiple Agile Conferences. The focus of the presentation is improving the quality and effectiveness of Agile Meetings.

Many who have downloaded this deck have made it a standard for assisting organizations who are struggling with spending too much time and money on Agile Meetings.

Published in: Technology, Business
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Facilitation Foundations - A Guide to Effective Agile Meetings

  1. 1. Facilitation FoundationsImproving the Quality of Agile MeetingsV. Lee Henson CST 1
  2. 2. Improving the Quality of Agile Meetings Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 2
  3. 3. ✤ Founded in 2007 - Salt Lake City, UT✤ Specialize in Public & Private Certification Workshops & Courses✤ Deep understanding of Agile & Traditional Project Management, (PMP), RUP, Lean, Kanban, Scrum, (CST), XP, & PMI-ACP✤ Proven Applied Agile Principles in Software, Hardware, Financial, Insurance, Construction, Medical, Marketing, Legal, Entertainment, Research, Military, Government, Retail, Education, Law Enforcement, and many more... 3
  4. 4. V. Lee Henson CST✤ Certified Scrum Trainer✤ Project Management Professional✤ PMI- Agile Certified Practitioner✤ Certified Lean Agile Professional✤ Motivational Speaker & Executive Coach✤ Author of The Definitive Agile Checklist✤ Inventor of Rapid Release Planning✤ Information Technology / Psychology 4Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only.
  5. 5. What Are We Trying To Solve?The 3 most common downfallsof meetings are: The meeting has no purpose or planned Agenda The incorrect participants are invited or not invited The meeting goes exactly as planned, without positive results Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 5
  6. 6. The Agile Manifesto We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work we have come to value: Individuals & Interactions over processes & tools Working software over comprehensive documentation Customer collaboration over contract negotiation Responding to change over following a plan That is , while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more. Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 6
  7. 7. Agile vs. Plan Driven Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 7
  8. 8. Scrum vs. Waterfall Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 8
  9. 9. The Why Behind the What: • Teams struggle when they have a Vision with no strategy to get there • Meetings can quickly dissolve when the right parties are not engaged and attend with a purpose • Once the vision and strategy are clear, the needed meetings fall into place Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 9
  10. 10. Forming - Storming • Forming represents building of the team • The Forming Stage is Important as team members get to know each other and gel • Storming occurs when the team addresses how they will function both independently and as a group • Storming may be painful, but is necessary for the team to be successful Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 10
  11. 11. Norming - Performing • Norming happens when teams adjust their behaviors and begin to work together as a cohesive unit • Motivation increases across the team as a result of Norming • Not all teams reach the Performing stage • At this point teams are able to handle both conflict and decision making without direct supervision Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 11
  12. 12. Get a Tool Kit! Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 12
  13. 13. Meeting Rules • Every Agile meeting should have a purpose and goal • Prior to holding a meeting, all key participants should be invited • The agenda for the meeting should be distributed prior to the meeting • The meeting goal & agenda should be distributed prior to the meeting • All resources should be reserved and prepared for the meeting • The meeting facilitation toolkit should be well stocked and ready to go • The team should establish and post effective meeting rules Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 13
  14. 14. Meeting Rules Continued• The meeting goal and objective should be presented• The time-boxed agenda should be presented• The rules should be posted and all should be reminded to take heed• If at any time a discussion begins that is not part of the agenda, the topic should be added to a running list for later discussion• If the meeting ends and the goal has not been reached, arrange for a subsequent meeting at a later time (do not go over time in hopes of solving an issue)• Once conclusive results have been reached, record all risks, assumptions, and action items• Insure that all list items have a party responsible to address each topic outside of this meeting• Post the results in a visible place for all to see Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 14
  15. 15. Fist To Five • Team makes decisions, ScrumMaster only guides the decision process • A ScrumMaster seeks consensus within the team, a quick way to do this Consensus = “I can live with and support that.” • Fist to five: • 5 = wild, unbridled support • 4 = this is a fine idea, wish I’d thought of it • 3 = I can live with and support it • 2 = I have reservations I’d like to think about • 1 = I am very opposed; we shouldn’t move Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 15
  16. 16. Fist To Five Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 16
  17. 17. What About Business Priority? ✤ We all know the business has a 3 point ranking scale for priority of backlog items: High, Really High, or Really Really High. ✤ The business needs to use tools to help them understand that not everything can be of the highest priority. ✤ With the understanding that weTwo websites to assist with priority: would not be doing the work if it http://dotmocracy.org were not important, which items http://www.innovationgames.com have the greatest urgency? Can we arrange them into High, Medium, and Low categories? Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 17
  18. 18. Time vs. Relative Complexity✤ Let’s paint the room!✤ How many hours will it take?✤ Why all of the different answers?✤ Have any of you painted before?✤ Compared to something else you have painted, would it be easier to determine how difficult it would be to paint the room?✤ Is it easier to reach consensus? Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 18
  19. 19. Planning Poker - Does It Work? Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 19
  20. 20. Let’s Use a T-Shirt Size...✤ Smaller Than XS = a Task.✤ Extra Small = 1✤ Small = 2✤ Medium = 3✤ Large = 5✤ Extra Large = 8✤ Larger than XL = an Epic Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 20
  21. 21. Understanding MoSCoW: ✤ MoSCoW = more than a Russian Capital ✤ Must Have ✤ Should Have ✤ Could Have ✤ Would Like ✤ Every iteration should have a mix of the above types of items. ✤ Stake holders LOVE the Would Likes. ✤ The Product Owner drives the product backlog and creates the rank order based heavily on the MoSCoW ratings. Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 21
  22. 22. Create Five Stories✤ Think about what you have learned about user stories Take a few moments to create five Story Cards that look like the ones we have created so far:✤ 1) Make 5 cards each with a title & description. (Bonus points for using roles & personas in the description.)✤ 2) Take the 5 cards and give them each a priority. (Remember, this is from the business perspective.)✤ 3) Take the 5 cards and give them each a MoSCoW rating. (Remember, this is from the customer perspective.)✤ 4) Next, take the 5 cards and give them a T-Shirt size based on relative complexity & scope.✤ 5) Finally, take the 5 cards and place them in stack rank order. Be certain to take all 3 corners into consideration when placing them in order. Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 22
  23. 23. The Formula✤ Here is the formula for correct placement of stack rank order of your backlog items. Address risk by performing the items with the highest complexity Must Have High Priority earlier working towards the lower complexity items later in the process: Would Like H-M-L✤ 1) All Must Have High Priority items should be considered first and foremost. Must Have Medium Priority✤ 2) Be certain to get at least one Would Like in every sprint. Next should be one Would Like High Priority Must Have Low Priority item.✤ 3) Next should be the Must Have Mediums and Must Should Have H-M-L Have Lows. Could Have H-M-L✤ 4) The Should’s go next from High to Low Priority.✤ 5) Finally, place the Could’s from Highest to Lowest All states are stack ranked from highest Priority. to lowest risk unless the velocity of the Sprint does not afford this as an option. Team velocity always prevails.✤ Note: Dependencies trump priority & moscow rating. Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 23
  24. 24. Rapid Release Planning Checklist• Product Vision Statement• Product Roadmap• Release Themes• Release Timeline• Important Dates in Release• Team Identification• Prioritized Product or Release Backlog• Team Velocity (or capacity)• Technical ‘gotchas’ and dependencies that we know already Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 24
  25. 25. Release vs. Sprint Planning Release Planning Iteration PlanningAttendees Team, SMEs and Team, SMEs and product owner product owner required. Managers/ required. Managers/ customers optional. customers optional.Lowest level of work User stories TasksbreakdownEstimates Provided in Points, t-shirt sizes, or Hours duration (weeks)Output of meeting Release plan (= high Iteration plan (= level plan for multiple detailed plan of tasks iterations) for one iteration) Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 25
  26. 26. Rapid Release Planning Instructions: 1) Print out all of the story cards you hope to be included in the release leaving off the product owner t-shirt size. (After all, we would not want to influence the team.) 2) Place all of the cards in a large box, bucket, or basket. 3) Invite all of the teams participating in the release to be part of the rapid release planning session to gather around a large table. 4) Explain that in a moment you will be dumping out all of the cards. The team will have a preset amount of time to find a card they all agree is small in scope. 5) Once the team has identified a small benchmark item, explain they will have a preset amount of time to place all of the remaining cards in columns on the wall listed as small, medium, and large relative to the first item and to each other. 6) If a team member picks up a card they are uncertain about, have them return the card to the table for other team members to review. Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 26
  27. 27. Rapid Release Planning Instructions: 7) If an item is smaller than small, make a column for extra small. If the item is larger than large make a column for extra large. 8) If an item is placed in the wrong column on the wall, feel free to move it. Any card can move except for the initial small benchmark item. 9) For the final few seconds, I command silence and have the team carefully study as many items on the wall as they can in an effort to allow for any final adjustments to be made. 10) Once the time expires, I excuse the team for an extended lunch and ask the product owners to stick around for a while so we can do a quick comparison. 11) Any items with no disparity or with only one column of difference in either direction between the product owner and the team is a good enough estimate. The team will get better at estimating as they go and product owner will have a lot fewer items for additional review. The teams estimate in this case is the final one. Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 27
  28. 28. Rapid Release Planning Instructions: 12) If there is more than one degree of separation in the t-shirt size between the product owner and the team, this warrants additional discussion regarding that item. In most cases this limits the number of items requiring additional conversation to a much smaller number. 13) Outliers are marked with moth the team size and the PO size and placed in a separate column for additional discussion. 14) When the team returns, we talk about the outliers for a time-boxed period of five minutes each in an attempt to clarify scope. 15) The teams estimate stands and we move quickly through the items. 16) Before we exit the room, the team takes a sheet of round stickies and identifies any backlog items in the release that have an internal or external dependency. 17) Based on the teams projected velocity, the product owner places items into future sprints to identify any items that could be considered at risk of not making the release. Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 28
  29. 29. The Sliding Scale✤ The amount of time allowed for each step in the Rapid Release Planning Process varies based on the number of items you are trying to plan for, the number of people, # Of Items # Of People and whether teams are remote or collocated. The scale at right should be used as a guide and can be adjusted according to what works best for you. Please remember: 0-99 (5) 1 Team (+0)✤ 1) The times are intentionally FAST! This is to perfect reaching a true grit gut decision instead of pondering. 100-199 (10) 2 Teams (+5)✤ 2) Every team member may not get to see every card. This is PERFECTLY fine. They need to trust in the ability of the 200-299 (15) 3 Teams (+10) team member that did see the card.✤ 3) Movement of cards throughout the exercise is both 300-399 (20) 4 Teams (+15) normal and expected.✤ 4) Limit the number of people participating to no more 400-499 (25) 5 Teams (+20) than 50 People. 500 (30) 6 Teams (+25)✤ 5) Video Record your teams executing this and send it directly to me or upload via YouTube for a chance to win cool prizes! Times in Parentheses should be added together to calculate the TOTAL team✤ Note: Remote teams should add 50% to the times listed. time needed for the RRP Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 29
  30. 30. At The Wall... Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 30
  31. 31. Sprint Planning - Six Steps✤ 1) Schedule items into a sprint making certain not to exceed the teams projected velocity. (If you did Rapid Release Planning, this step is done)✤ 2) Review Team member capacity to ensure that people will not be over allocating themselves.✤ 3) Detail Planning - Breakdown the work into tests and tasks. (No estimating or signing up for the work should take place during this step.)✤ 4) Member Planning - Allow team members to sign up for the work they choose and give an estimate in hours as to how long each task will take to complete.✤ 5) Review open issues and impediments that may put any item in the sprint at risk. Replace items as needed with approval from the product owner.✤ 6) COMMIT to the sprint as a team! (Let’s do this!) Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 31
  32. 32. Meeting Timeline Guide:✤ Scrum Meetings should be time-boxed according to the number of weeks in the sprint.✤ For example: If you are doing two week sprints, the sprint planning meeting should last no longer than two hours. Three weeks = three hours. Etc.✤ The same holds true for end of sprint meetings. Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 32
  33. 33. The Daily Standup Rules:✤ Daily 15 minute or less ✤ Do not be late... meeting ✤ Fines go to a reputable charity✤ Same time same place everyday ✤ Team stands in a circle✤ No problem solving ✤ Chickens around the outside✤ * No Electronics of any kind ✤ Chickens follow the same rules✤ No pen and paper to record ✤ Stick to the three questions✤ Team rules posted on the wall ✤ Always end on time Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 33
  34. 34. Hold a Daily Standup✤ Many teams regard the daily standup as a less than desirable meeting. These teams have not fully embraced what the standup is intended to do. Today we will hold a daily standup:✤ 1) Eight volunteers will participate in this meeting. Imagine you are a team member developing an e-commerce website.✤ 2) Take a moment to decide what you have been working on and how you will answer the following 3 questions: ✤ What have you worked on since we last met? ✤ What will you be working on until we meet again? ✤ Are there any obstacles preventing you from making forward progress that you cannot solve yourself?✤ 3) The ScrumMaster will facilitate, not drive the meeting.✤ 4) We will try hard to give a solid report in record time.✤ 5) At the conclusion, we will review and discuss improvements. Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 34
  35. 35. Review & Demo • Delivered features • Incomplete features • Verifying ‘Done’ with the customer/ product owner • Maintaining trust with customer by not “hiding” undone work • Team and Customer responds to the delivery • The Goal: Collaborative Decision- Making about the emerging product Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 35
  36. 36. Retrospectives• Project retrospectives help teams examine what went right and what went wrong on a project• Retrospectives are designed to:• Find & fix problems• Find and Reinforce team strengths• Address both people & technical issues• Use tools and practices proven in the real world• The retrospective is the perfect chance to inspect and adapt.• Teams who perform meaningful retrospectives are consistently better at completing work on time and under budget• Ask the 3 questions and record findings Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 36
  37. 37. Sample Retrospective Agenda✤ What were the major events in our timeline?✤ What can we observe about the flow of events?✤ What were the sprint metrics like?✤ What have we learned about the product as a result of the sprint?✤ What have we learned about the team as a result of the sprint?✤ What worked well in our sprint that we would want to do again?✤ What do we wish we had done differently?✤ What recommendations are there moving forward with our next sprint?✤ Inspect the process not the people. Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 37
  38. 38. Innovation Games • These interactive techniques let your customers and prospects help you create the products they want. Understand customer needs, identify product functionality, learn how customers interact with your products, and shape your products’ future • Luke Hohmann has devoted his professional career to creating environments where everyone can work to their fullest creative and intellectual abilities. He is a committed coach, working with every individual and the organization as a whole to achieve greater levels of performance Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 38
  39. 39. ✤ You now hold the keys to success!✤ You have been educated and empowered.✤ Visit often and drink from the well! http://www.agiledad.com/ Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 39
  40. 40. Thank You! Lee@AgileDad.Com- Twitter @AgileDad - LinkedIn leehenson@gmail.com Copyright 2012 AgileDad LLC Licensed for Classroom Use Only. 40

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