Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Hyphen 31 | 2003 18
Employment and environment
Role and functions of voluntary work
Elisabeth Redler
Director of Anstiftun...
Hyphen 31 | 2003 19
Changing functions
In performing a task they themselves
have chosen, individuals act for the
good of t...
Hyphen 31 | 2003 20
to protect the heritage, in particular
through appropriate management of
nature and landscapes;
to pro...
Hyphen 31 | 2003 21
INORMATIONS FROM THE FEDERATIONS
Denmark
Ecological sanitation - sustainable sanitation
in allotment g...
Hyphen 31 | 2003 22
because the users if they manually ad-
ded water after urinating only used small
amounts.
Concentratio...
Hyphen 31 | 2003 23
Comfort of sitting
The comfort of sitting on the toilets
were reported in only positive terms by
63 us...
Hyphen 31 | 2003 24
France
The Garden of Eden
The earth for the people living at
biblical times is a reality promised by
G...
Hyphen 31 | 2003 25
fields by doing the works that are easier
than labouring and sowing: taking out
weeds, forking the ear...
Hyphen 31 | 2003 26
Germany
International garden exhibition in Rostock
2003 - a very diversified gardening culture
The yea...
Hyphen 31 | 2003 27
ners of Mecklenburg and Vorpommern
proposes the visit of the international
exhibition 2003 at special ...
Hyphen 31 | 2003 28
NEWS
News from the federations
Finland
September meeting of the chairmen of the member allotment garde...
Hyphen 31 | 2003 29
Luxembourg
13. 04. 2003 National congress dedicated to the 75th anniversary
07. 06. 2003 75th "mother ...
Hyphen 31 | 2003 30
France
Deposit in the House of Parliament of a draft law concerning the amendment of the existing text...
Hyphen 31 | 2003 31
SEMINAR OF THE INTERNATIONAL OFFICE
workshop I Water in the allotment garden sites
Lecturer: Dusan HUS...
Hyphen 31 | 2003 32
SEMINAR OF THE INTERNATIONAL OFFICE
workshop II : Ecological culture of fruit
lecture and discussions
...
Hyphen 31 | 2003 33
ADDRESSES OF THE NATIONAL FEDERATIONS
Nationaal Verbond van
Volkstuinen vzw/Ligue
Nationale du Coin de...
Hyphen 31 | 2003 34
editor: Office International du Coin de Terre et des Jardins Familiaux a.s.b.l.
20, rue de Bragance, L...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Larsen, I., Backlund, A. 2003: Denmark - Ecological Sanitation - Sustainable Sanitation in Allotment Gardens in Denmark, part 1. Article in "The Hyphen" 31/2003 p 18 - 34

8 views

Published on

Article about The National Danish Environmental Protection Agency - Project M226-0057 Ecological Handling of Human Urine, Human Feces and Greywater in Allotment Gardens using Dry Diverting Toilets and Zero Discharge Willow Wastewater Evapotranspiration

Published in: Environment
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Larsen, I., Backlund, A. 2003: Denmark - Ecological Sanitation - Sustainable Sanitation in Allotment Gardens in Denmark, part 1. Article in "The Hyphen" 31/2003 p 18 - 34

  1. 1. Hyphen 31 | 2003 18 Employment and environment Role and functions of voluntary work Elisabeth Redler Director of Anstiftung Research Association Munich Are Hanneke van Veen and Rob van Eeden, the Dutch authors of several best-sellers on the virtues of miserliness, guilty of a dual dereliction of the duty to support job creation? Their books urge us to reduce our levels of consumption and so spare both our wallets and the environment, with damaging effects on employment in the manufacturing and commercial sectors. Moreover, the- se �new Scrooges� have written various guides on how best to make your money work for you, trespassing on the preser- ve of investment advisors, debt consul- tants and various other professional categories in the financial services sec- tor. Like other voluntary workers, they add their personal touch to the colourful panorama of employment categories in the fringes of the private and public sectors. Their example shows that em- ployment policy objectives do not always mix well with environmental policy ob- jectives. Likewise, schemes to promote autonomy, exchange and sharing, which are also sustainable forms of consump- tion, find themselves charged with the crime of destroying jobs by reducing consumption. Threat or opportunity? Hugely exaggerated accusations of this kind lead to many tentative initiatives being abandoned before they really get off the ground. The most serious aspect in political terms, however, is probably the fact that a sector of society which so far has developed according to its own rules � voluntary workers perform tasks they have chosen themselves � is being subjected to the rules of the labour market, the economy and govern- ment social policy. This trend can be seen at several levels: the work of self- help groups and voluntary associations is increasingly being guided by the cri- teria of efficiency and service to the customer; governments grants are con- ditional on quality assurance and the integration of the long-term unemployed; and the champions of the third sector themselves, who have the wind in their sails, emphasise the sector�s potential in employment terms. Yet researchers at John Hopkins University have shown in an international study on the third sector that only a very small proportion (1,1%) of jobs in the environmental sector involve non- profitmaking activities, from which they conclude that the third sector is neither a threat to employment nor a potential source of job op- portunities. Positive impetus The great democratic value of voluntary work must be properly recognised. Unconventional, au- tonomous voluntary work is part of a society�s wealth and therefore deserves to be protected and supported. It shapes the activity, flexibility and cohesion of the community, thus contributing to its via- bility. Voluntary work is a barometer of unsatisfied needs. Citizens become in- volved in areas where services are ina- dequate, areas ignored by government and the market, serving causes that do not enjoy the favour of the prevailing ideology.Alongside these efforts, political initiatives sometimes also emerge and fight hard to win financial support for their objectives or to have stricter regu- lations imposed. The voluntary sector thus becomes a source of new, positive impetus for the employment market, and this influence is very noticeable, for instance, in the environmental sector. Job creation in non-profitmaking orga- nisations in the environmental techno- logy and monitoring sectors is among the political successes achieved. Volun- tary work acts as a force for innovation here, including in the official sector. The fact that the two objectives, environment and employment, can be reconciled in this way will of course be welcomed, but no greater value will be attached to it at political level than to the democratic quality of voluntary work. Voluntary work (honorary post) in Europe's leisure garden associations (York 2002) COUNCIL OF EUROPE
  2. 2. Hyphen 31 | 2003 19 Changing functions In performing a task they themselves have chosen, individuals act for the good of the community without waiting for legislation, an employment contract or pay to justify their work. Although the intrinsic value of what they do is in no way threatened by the creation of jobs in associations and self-help groups, it is threatened by the �colonisation� of the third sector, which can involve the following, for instance: the third sector has to carry out all the tasks which government and the market are unwilling or unable to per- form. The tasks are assigned from out- side and not chosen by the sector itself; the third sector has to absorb all those who cannot find employment in the conventional labour market. The image of work for the public good be- comes blurred with that of compulsory work; small-scale individual initiatives are lumped together with the big traditional charitable organisations, which then play a dominant role in the political evolution of the �third sector� defined in this way. In future, full employment will depend less on the creation of new jobs and more on the fair distribution of existing work. Taking on a task that meets one�s own needs and those of the community is one way of making good use of free time and filling the vocational vacuum left by the decline in paid employment. Moreover, if the post-materialist ap- proach is accompanied by a commit- ment to work for the environment, it offers a possible means of solving envi- ronmental and employment problems at the same time. Article published in the journal NATUROPA iss. 92/2000 Voluntary work in the allotment garden movement Managing the heritage wisely and creating jobs - the experience of Regional Nature Parks in France Jean-Luc SADORGE Director of the Federation of Regional nature parks of France Regional Nature Parks were first esta- blished in 1967 as a means of contribu- ting to both the preservation and the economic development of France�s most vulnerable regions. The parks do not therefore set protection against develop- ment, but build local development stra- tegies based on making the most of the heritage. Three key concepts Three key concepts apply here: regi- ons, plans and contracts. Regions The boundaries of Regional Nature Parks are determined by heritage criteria relating to nature, culture, history and landscapes. Plans The plans for the individual parks, on which the entire system is based, are laid down in ten-year charters. These are drawn up following reviews of all of the assets and constraints of the region concerned, in both heritage and socio- economic terms. Contracts Once they have been drawn up, the charters have the legal force of con- tracts. They are approved by all the local authorities concerned and then officially validated by decree for ten-year periods on a proposal from the Minister for the Environment. There are now 38 such Regional Nature parks in France. They are to be found in almost every part of the country, cover over 10% of its national territory and have approximately 3 million inha- bitants. Five objectives The Regional Nature Parks have five statutory objectives: COUNCIL OF EUROPE
  3. 3. Hyphen 31 | 2003 20 to protect the heritage, in particular through appropriate management of nature and landscapes; to promote economic, social and cultural development and improve the quality of life; to contribute to regional/spatial plan- ning; to attract visitors and educate and inform the public; to perform activities of an experimen- tal or exemplary nature in these areas. Responsibility for implementing these objectives lies with autonomous public bodies headed by local elected repre- sentatives and assisted by multidisci- plinary technical teams that cover the fields provided for in each park�s charter. The technical teams include biologists, architects, agronomists, tourism experts, educationalists, economists and fore- sters, etc, with the skill mix being adap- ted to the needs of the individual parks. An asset for local development Designating a region as a nature park immediately gives it a positive public image, which, in turn, is an asset for local development. There are several reasons for this: Firstly, the system is operated by twin �keys�. In other words, local initiative is combined with official designation at national level. Without strong commit- ment at local level, it would not be pos- sible to protect the heritage credibly on a scale as large as that of the Regional Nature Parks, as it would be impossible to get local people to accept schemes imposed by central government. On the other hand, the fact that parks are desi- gnated by central government decree gives the procedure legal force. Secondly, the credibility in conserva- tion terms immediately becomes a tourist asset. Following a well-established pat- tern � which itself poses problems for the managers concerned � the action of protecting a particular region�s herita- ge makes it more attractive to visitors. At the same time, the impact of desi- gnation as a Regional Nature Park is not confined to tourism. �Regional Nature Parks� is a registered trademark owned by the French Ministry for the Environ- ment. When a park is established by decree, the body responsible for mana- ging it takes over the trademark and acquires the right to grant the use of the corresponding logo to businesses within the park, in accordance with specifica- tions based on precise criteria. Regard- less of whether they are in the productive or service sectors, the businesses are thus able to use the logo in their marke- ting and profit from the park�s positive image. Lastly, designation as a Regional Nature Park also helps make the region concerned stand out as a recognised and unique heritage asset, rather than just a marginalized rural area. This is a source of pride and dynamism for the local community. A role in job preservation In view of all of the above factors, a study conducted in 1996 on employment and Regional Nature Parks showed that the parks play a major role in stabilising and preserving employment in rural areas. They are not only employers (direct employment) and investors and buyers of goods and services (indirect employment), but also the initiators of projects (induced employment). Since the jobs created are long-term in nature, even though their number does tend to decline over time, the study concluded that Regional Nature Parks created between 18 000 and 35 000 jobs lasting a year during the year under review. When the number of jobs created or preserved is compared with the total budget of the Regional Nature Parks, the great efficiency of the parks therefore becomes clear. Living laboratories for sustainable development Aware of the importance of these findings, the Federation of Regional Nature Parks is now conducting an inter- park round of discussions and trial sche- mes in eight pilot parks as part of an ADAPT European programme, the aims being to: strengthen ties with the firms that are the parks� natural partners. This involves working on the recognition, enhancement and improvement of their image, the quality of their products and services and their compatibility with the park charters. In other words, the efforts are essentially geared towards optimi- sing a strategy adopted by the firms to make them stand out in their markets; develop working relations with new businesses (small and medium-sized firms from all sectors), in particular those involved in production activities, and launch wide-ranging initiatives on issues that have so far received little attention. While maintaining their heritage- based approach, the parks have every- thing to gain from strengthening their business culture ands their specific eco- nomic development know-how. By put- ting into practice on a daily basis the idea that nature conservation will, in future, depend on the commitment of both business and society at large � a position that has been universally ac- cepted since the Rio Summit � France�s Regional Nature Parks are acting as 38 living laboratories for sustainable de- velopment. Their experience shows that preser- ving landscape and nature can be a good means of contributing to the eco- nomic and social development of a country�s most vulnerable regions. Article published in the journal NATUROPA iss. 92/2000 COUNCIL OF EUROPE
  4. 4. Hyphen 31 | 2003 21 INORMATIONS FROM THE FEDERATIONS Denmark Ecological sanitation - sustainable sanitation in allotment gardens in Denmark, part 1 Resume In the HYPHEN/BINDESTRICH 27/2001 the Danish project �Ecological handling of wastewater in allotment gardens by means of diverting dry toilet systems and willow evapotranspiration beds� which is the biggest and most detailed ever done about diverting dry toilet systems was presented concerning background and planned investigations. No-mixing/diverting toilet systems without water flush were established to test and demonstrate organic and sus- tainable sanitation systems as alterna- tives to systems with chemicals or water flushing closets in combination with collecting tanks or sewers. Many Danish gardeners have stop- ped using pesticides and want to de- velop a more ecological behaviour also in sanitation. Water flush toilets in com- bination with collection tanks are very expensive resulting in economical and social problems. Trucks collecting wa- stewater destroys the often primitive roads. Establishing sewage is also very expensive and often resulting in different problems. Both solutions with water flushing toilets also works against the idea of allotment gardens as only being used half of the year and without some of the features known from permanent living. No mixing toilets/diverting toilets were introduced to implement ecological and sustainable behaviour with a high sanitary comfort. This article describes some of the results from the project running from 1998 � 2002 as a co-operation between the Danish Allotment Gardens Associa- tion, 10 local organisations, A& B Back- lund ApS, The Danish Technical Univer- sity and the municipalities of Ballerup and Herlev.The project had Arne Backlund from A & B Backlund ApS as a project manager and was partly financed by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency. Methodology 89 toilets were installed and experi- ences from 81 of them could be collec- ted. Participation was free for organiza- tions and members and the choice among a range of toilets and containers were free. Information about the sys- tems, the handling and the ideas were presented on arrangements. The parti- cipants were free to contact the project manager concerning questions. The participants were responsible them- selves for mounting and running of the systems. Written questionnaires played a minor role. Information about among others expectations and experiences with installation and running were col- lected. All participants were personally interviewed by phone or at a visit. Many of the installations were inspected. Sam- ples of collected urine were taken from 10 allotment gardens and analysed for among others nutrients, heavy metals, organic compounds and microor- ganism. The participants delivering urine were especially interviewed concerning questions relevant for the quality of the urine. Sample of faeces/ composted faeces were not taken and analysed in this but in another project. Main conclusions Diverting dry toilets are good alterna- tives. Mounting, cleaning as well as emptying of the toilet were all found easy to carry out. The project participants in the inve- stigation were very positive and have had very few problems which were sol- ved. The daily use of the toilet were ge- nerally without problems but some wo- men found it difficult to hit the urine bowl. After a period of getting acquainted with the system only two women still had difficulties. Inconveniences in the shape of flies, noise and smells have been minimal and the users have solved the few pro- blems occurring themselves. The urine was very concentrated Ivan Larsen, Chairman of the Danish Allotment Garden Association Arne Backlund, Project manager, Director of A & B BACKLUND ApS Big success with no-mix toilets without water flush �It's the best thing I ever did.� (A user's comment)
  5. 5. Hyphen 31 | 2003 22 because the users if they manually ad- ded water after urinating only used small amounts. Concentrations of heavy metals and organic compounds were low much lo- wer than the limit values in the sludge regulation. The urine was well suited to be used as a fertiliser. The project par- ticipants would have liked to use of mixture of collected urine and water as a fertiliser in their individual garden. In the investigation neither bacterial nor parasitic infectious micro organisms of the types: Campylobacter, Salmonel- la, Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia duodenalis or other intestinal parasites were found. Diverting toilet systems without water flush is a good ecological alternative to chemical closets as well as an econo- mical and an ecological alternative to water flushing toilets with collection tanks or sewage. Project results Characteristics of allotment gardensand participants The methods for collection of user experiences were described. The ten allotment garden associations were cha- racterised through numbers and sizes of the gardens. Garden sizes were ge- nerally 390 � 400 m2. The age and the sex of the users, and distribution among the allotment gardens, were stated. 80 allotment garden houses had altogether 176 permanent users, slightly more wo- men than men. 27 permanent users were under 18 years of age and 13 of those under the age of six. Answering a questionnaire, 34 participating gardens responded that they used the allotment garden 60 � 230 days a year. The gar- dens were in average used 145 days a year. The water demand including water for irrigating the garden was in five allo- tment gardens from 4 - 20 m3 with an average of 11m3. Finally the focus were on the toilets previously used in the allotment garden houses. The most commonly used toilet was a chemical toilet. 55 out of 81 toilets had been chemical. Choice of toilet and urine container The participants could choose bet- ween four toilet models in plastic, two in wood, one in metal and one in sanitary porcelain. The toilet stool in porcelain has a collection unit under the floor to collect faeces; all other models collect faeces in the toilet above the floor. 76 participants choosed toilets with fans (12V or 220V with an effect from 1W to 19W). Most frequently a �Separett Weekend�, 37 out of 89, was chosen. 80 participants preferred 25-litre urine containers and only 9 the big 220-litre containers. Characteristics of the collected urine The 10 households delivering urine mixture for sampling and analysis were described. The households were descri- bed regarding numbers of permanent users, age, sex, type of toilet, urine container, efficiency of the source diver- ting system and the frequency of empty- ing the urine container. The results of the chemical and microbiological analy- sis were presented. The urine mixture was very concen- trated with a concentration of nutrients of 5400-mg N, 360 mg P and 1100 mg K per litre. The concentrations of heavy metals were very low, much lower than the limit values given in the sludge di- rective and also much lower than the contents found in other organic fertilisers. The concentrations of the investigated organic compounds were also low, much lower than the limit values. There were no findings of bacterial infectious matters, such as Campylob- acter or Salmonella or parasitic infectious matters such as Cryptosporidium par- vum, Giardia duodenalis or other inte- stinal parasites, in the urine mixture from any of the 10 households. Amounts of thermo tolerant coliforms were already at the first sampling below the detection level (10-cfu/100 ml) for 9 of the 10 urine mixtures. The sample, in which thermo tolerant coliforms could be detected, was under the detection level at the second analysis approximately one month after sampling in the allotment garden. Amounts of enterococcus were below detection level (10-cfu/100 ml) for five of the urine mixtures at the se- cond analysis approximately one month after sampling. At the third analysis approximately two months after sam- pling additional four samples were below detection levels. In the last urine mixture the amount of enterococcus was not detectable at the fourth analysis after approximately three months. pH was from 8.8 � 9.2. Experiences from mounting and running Installation of toilets, ventilation sy- stems, and urine systems with 25-litre containers were generally easy. To dig down 220-litre containers demanded more work and efforts. Experiences from the running of the faeces system, the urine system and the ventilation system were reported. The experiences were positive. �Separett Weekend� �WM ES� �ES" in addition an urine container INORMATIONS FROM THE FEDERATIONS
  6. 6. Hyphen 31 | 2003 23 Comfort of sitting The comfort of sitting on the toilets were reported in only positive terms by 63 users (nine users had provided foot stools on their own). All of the partici- pants using toilet models with sitting heights of 40, 42 and 46 cm were satis- fied. More different opinions were ex- pressed regarding sitting heights of 49, 50 and 53 cm without stools, 18 of these users would prefer a stool. Ivan Larsen, Chairman of the Danish Allotment Garden Association Frederikssundsvej 304A, DK-2700 Bro- enshoej, D�nemark Tel.: +45 38288750, Fax: +45 38288350 E-mail: info@kolonihave.dk Internet: www.kolonihave.dk Arne Backlund, Project manager, Direc- tor of A & B BACKLUND ApS Ordrupvej 101, DK-2920 Charlottenlund, D�nemark Tel.: +45 39633364, Fax:+4539636455 E-mail: backlund@backlund.dk Internet:www.backlund.backlund.dk to be continued �Separett Villa� �H66� Ecological sanitary installations can be an option in allotments INORMATIONS FROM THE FEDERATIONS
  7. 7. Hyphen 31 | 2003 24 France The Garden of Eden The earth for the people living at biblical times is a reality promised by God to the chosen people. On its small territory even at the time of its greatest extension under Salomon (970-931 a. C.) the land was contained in narrow limits: 230 kilometres from north to south, 27 to 150 kilometres between the Medi- terranean and the frontiers of the desert. On these restricted sources you can find numerous landscapes and climates. The internal snow of the Hermon moun- tains are only at a few hours walk from the solitude of the desert. The green manures of Galilee touch the lunar areas of the Jordan valley and the Dead Sea. People of the Bible express these con- trasts by saying that their country is both the country where milk and honey flows and the unmerciful earth that devores its inhabitants. The absence of rivers and brooks makes the cultivation dependant on rain and dew. The people living at that time know how to irrigate the gardens by following the example of what is done in Egypt. But the shortness of water limits a satisfactory irrigation of the ve- getable garden and the orchard to supply the needs of the families. He knows his enemies: the hails and the flying gras- shoppers described by the prophets Jo�l and Amos. He uses iron tools: hoe, plough pulled by two oxen or donkeys with the prohibition to use two animals of different species for the labour. How- ever for the small works, tools of stone or wood are of common usage. In order to transport the harvest one uses don- keys or charts pulled by oxen. The people of that period live in brick houses that are constructed around a court yard. The roof is nearly flat but has a small inclination in order to allow the rain- waters to flow into a cistern. Beside the house you find a vegetable garden where one cultivates the regional vegetables: peas, alliums, melons, oni- ons, cucumbers and pumpkins. At the font of the garden you find a few vines and a fig tree that invoke the image of a perfect happiness to the passing peop- le. They sow hard weat and bailey before or after the first rains (November till December) and the harvest takes place in June or July accordingly to the diffe- rent species and regions. Flax is culti- vated for commercial aims. Fruit grows all over the country. Vines, fig trees, pomegranate trees, olives trees and palm trees characterise the landscapes of the Bible. One has to add apple trees, hazel, and almonds trees. The law for- bids to knock down a fruit tree. After the first rains, women, old peo- ple and children have to work on the P. L�v�que INORMATIONS FROM THE FEDERATIONS
  8. 8. Hyphen 31 | 2003 25 fields by doing the works that are easier than labouring and sowing: taking out weeds, forking the earth. At spring time the heavy work starts, for example: the thrashing and taking out of the corn, the vintage, wine production, the harvest of olives and the fabrication of oils etc.. The climate and the flora stimulate the growth of the bees. Honey is con- sidered as a basic product. The wax is used for the fabrication of candles. The Man of the Bible uses aromatic plants, that are very prosperous in the heath land, for its food and the fabrica- tion of perfumes: myrrhe, capers, seed mustard (black mustard) camomile, ver- bena, cumin, anise flowers of lily and jasmine. The work of the earth puts rhythm to people�s life. The harvest, the vintages and the harvest of olives are sung by the farmers and their families. After the vintages one celebrates the weddings of the daughters. The value of the work of the earth is underlined very strongly by the dates of the three main religious celebrations: Pessah (Eastern) at the beginning of the harvest of the barley, Soukot (Whit- sun) during the fruit and corn harvest, the Cabane (Feast of the Tabernacles) at the end of the annual agriculture cycle. Article published in the Jardin Familial de France n� 414/2002 INORMATIONS FROM THE FEDERATIONS
  9. 9. Hyphen 31 | 2003 26 Germany International garden exhibition in Rostock 2003 - a very diversified gardening culture The year 2003 offers a special ad- venture to all gardening friends: The international garden exhibition (IGA) in Rostock. During 171 days from April 25th till October 12th 2003 all the guest can admire on the exhibition ground at the border of the Warnow numerous examples of domestic and international gardening culture. The ground of a surface of 100 ha is a natural ground, crossed by rivers and small running waters, that have been put again in their original state for the international garden exhibition. The area of the borders of the lower Warnow has been completely changed. The existing constructions of the village of "Schmarl" and the leisure gardens situated close to it have been integrated in the exhi- bition. The great hall of more than 10.000 m2 that can be divided in different parts with its characteristic ceiling will show in a rhythm of one or two weeks a chan- ging exhibition of flowers and plants. On the rest of the ground you can find for example a special place dedicated to roses, and you will see throughout the year different plant cultivations.There will be thematic gardens and gardening cultures from yesterday and today. The visitors can as well learn everything on annual plants. If the suspended gardens have been the main attraction of the exhibition in Hannover, the swimming gardens will be the main attraction of the green in- ternational exhibition near the sea of Rostock. Floating stages of different sizes near the borders will change the Warnow in a sea of flowers. Some of these flower islands can be walked on and you can find there grounds for the organisation of meetings as well as gastronomic equipments. In these swim- ming gardens you can familiarise yours- elf with the thematic liaison with the element called water. According to the international charac- ter of the exhibition the national gar- dens will give an exotic flair to the inter- national garden exhibition. Very close to the new leisure garden site you will be able to admire for example the Chi- nese garden. A funicular will circulate in a trian- gular way over the ground during the period of exhibition. You cannot find something similar in the whole North of Germany. Another attraction will be among others the cathedral made of willow, the greatest construction of living plants in which one can cele- brate religious events, concerts, lec- tures and as well weddings can take place there. Special conditions for the leisure gardeners The federation of the leisure garde- The allotment settlement "Schmarl" have been intergrated in the exhibition INORMATIONS FROM THE FEDERATIONS
  10. 10. Hyphen 31 | 2003 27 ners of Mecklenburg and Vorpommern proposes the visit of the international exhibition 2003 at special conditions to all German leisure gardeners. Are pla- ned both one day excursions and jour- neys with spending the night in the re- gion and additional program. The program can be adapted indivi- dually for every group. The arrival can be made either by bus, train or plane. For journeys with some nights spent in the region one suggests a planning in good time considering the hotel situation in Rostock and in the areas along the coast. Wishes and demands can be addressed already now to: PTI Panoramica Touristik International GmbH Neu Roggentiner Str. 3 18184 Roggentin Person to contact: Frau Kratzsch Telefon: 038204/65750 | Telefax: 038204/6588750 E-Mail: kratzsch@pti.de | Internet: www.pti.de National gardens, the traditional ship and the cathedral made of willow are special attractions of the IGA INORMATIONS FROM THE FEDERATIONS
  11. 11. Hyphen 31 | 2003 28 NEWS News from the federations Finland September meeting of the chairmen of the member allotment garden associations in Helsinki France 17. - 18. 05. 2003 National congress in Tourcoing (North) subject: "The allotment gardens in the heart of the city" June 2003 National congress of social housing in Lille Germany 14. - 16. 03. 2003 judicial seminar concerning financial questions 21. - 23. 03. 2003 meeting of the executive board 13. - 15. 06. 2003 seminar on biodiversity in the allotment and leisure garden: an ecological contribution of the leisure garden movement 15. 06. 2003 European Day of the Garden in Rostock 11. - 13. 07. 2003 meeting of the technical advisers: subject "Roses" 07. 09. 2003 National congress of the German federation 19. - 21. 09. 2003 meeting of the technical advisers: subject competition 10. - 12. 10. 2003 judicial seminar concerning the evaluation an important element for a regulated change of leaseholders 24. - 26. 10 .2003 seminar concerning social questions. Subject: "Social changes in Germany and possible consequences for the leisure garden movement" Great Britain 07. 06. 2003 Annual General Meeting Meetings and Organizations
  12. 12. Hyphen 31 | 2003 29 Luxembourg 13. 04. 2003 National congress dedicated to the 75th anniversary 07. 06. 2003 75th "mother day" celebration in Bettembourg 17. 10. 2003 Celebration for the 75th anniversary Slovakia Exhibition - Z�hradk�r in Trencina, Agricultural complexe in Nitra Switzerland 14. 06. 2003 42nd Congress in Bern Finland Sustainable summer vacationing or "How to spend your summer ecologically", France Research work ordered by the Ministery of Agriculture: "Let us rehabilitate the allotment gardens", Document: Let us create plots of happiness at the bottom of flat houses, "Letter to the presidents of the associations" (6-times yearly,) The French allotment garden (6-times yearly), Germany Green series: issue 157-162, Brochure concerning the 20th federal competition 2002: "The gardens in the town planning", Luxembourg 9 monthly reviews, "Pocket booklet 2003": "Concerning the construction of dwelling houses and flats", Switzerland 3rd edition of the brochure: "The leisure gardens cultivated in a nature-related way" Belgium Statutory renewal of the general assembly and the executive board Documentations Necessary Informations NEWS
  13. 13. Hyphen 31 | 2003 30 France Deposit in the House of Parliament of a draft law concerning the amendment of the existing texts on allotment gardens and gardens for reinsertion of excluded persons into society: Germany International gardening exhibition 2003 integration of a leisure garden site in the exhibition, exhibition of the central federation and the national federationduring 6 months, seminar on environmental questions Federal competition The Central leisure garden federation evaluates the 20th federal competition, many examples to be imitated by leisure gardeners were noticed. "European Day of the Garden" in Rostock on June 15th 2003 International subject: "The leisure gardens a social mission" Foreigners Intergation The Central federation deals especially with the questions concerning emigrant persons and develops a specific programme with several steps. A specific person in every national federation will deal with these questions. SEMINAR OF THE INTERNATIONAL OFFICE Seminar of the International Office in Bratislava (Slowakei) Provisional Schedule Date : 28. - 31. August 2003 Location : Bratislava- HOTEL DANUBE Opening Address Allotment garden sites- today and futures perspectives Lecturer: Juraj KORCEK- Director of the Slovakian federation (SZZ) NEWS
  14. 14. Hyphen 31 | 2003 31 SEMINAR OF THE INTERNATIONAL OFFICE workshop I Water in the allotment garden sites Lecturer: Dusan HUSKA - Slovakia workshop II Ecological culture of fruit Lecturer: Prof. HRICOVSKY- President of the SZZ workshop III Allotment garden sites in the heart of the city Lecturer: J�r�me CLEMENT- French allotment garden federation Expected number of particpants : 200 persons Accomodation: Hotel DANUBE in Bratislava Seminar expenses: Accomodation 3 nights: single room: 72 � by the night double room: 82 � by the night Seminar fee: 300 � per delegate 200 � per escort Thursday, 28. 08. 2003 to 2.00 pm Arrival of the participants Accomodation in the hotel DANUBE 10.00 am General assembly International Office 3.00 pm Welcome of the participants by the president of the Slovakian Allotment Garden federation - Mr. Ivan HRICOVSKY Opening of the International seminar by the president of the International Office - Mr. Bruno RAJAUD Adress by the Secretary general of the International Office - Mrs. Malou WEIRICH Adresses by official guests 4.00 pm Introductory lecture: Allotment garden sites - today and perspectives for the future Lecturer: Juraj KORCEK 4.45 pm Coffee break 5.15 pm Discussions 7.00 pm Ceremonial dinner in the hotel-restaurant DANUBE Friday, 29. 08. 2003 7.00 - 8.00 am Breakfast in the hotel DANUBE 8.30 - 11.30 am workshop I: Water in the allotment garden sites lecture and discussions
  15. 15. Hyphen 31 | 2003 32 SEMINAR OF THE INTERNATIONAL OFFICE workshop II : Ecological culture of fruit lecture and discussions workshop III: The allotment garden sites in the heart of city lecture and discussions 10.00 am Coffee break 12.00 am Lunch in the hotel-restaurant DANUBE 1.30 - 5.00 pm Trip to Gabeikovo with refreshments 6.00 - 7.00 pm Visit of the Europe-place in Komarno 7.00 pm Dinner in Komarno 10.30 pm Return to the hotel DANUBE Saturday, 30. 08. 2003 7.30 - 8.30 am Breakfast in the hotel DANUBE 9.00 - 11.30 am Report of the workshops l, II, III Summary of the seminar Mr. Wilhelm WOHATSCHEK, president of the executive board Final words by the president of the International Office Mr. Bruno RAJAUD Final words by the president of the Slovakian allotment garden federation, Mr. Ivan HRICOVSKY 10.00 am Coffee break 12.00 am Lunch in common in hotel DANUBE 1.00 pm Departure to Senica 2.30 - 5.00 pm Visit to the allotment garden site Senica-Kunov Awarding the diploma for an ecological gardening 6.00 - 7.30 pm Visit to the castle "Cerveny Kamen" 8.00 - 10.30 pm Dinner in the wine castle - tavern Pezinok with wine- tasting 11.00 pm Return to the hotel DANUBE Sunday, 31. 08. 2003 8.00 - 9.00 am Breakfast in the hotel DANUBE 9.30 - 11.00 am Sightseeing to Bratislava
  16. 16. Hyphen 31 | 2003 33 ADDRESSES OF THE NATIONAL FEDERATIONS Nationaal Verbond van Volkstuinen vzw/Ligue Nationale du Coin de Terre et du Foyer-Jardins Populaires ASBL Belgium association's place: Vogelmarkt 11 B -9000 GENT secretary's office: c/o L. Van Bellegham Oudburgweg 6 B-9830 St. Martens-Latem Tel.: 09/329 85 22 Fax: 09/329 85 22 E-mail: n.ghesquiere@pi.be Denmark Kolonihaveforbundet for Denmark Federikssundsvej 304 A DK - 2700 BRONSHOJ Tel.: 3828 8750 Fax: 3828 8350 E-mail: info@kolonihave.dk Germany Bundesverband Deutscher Gartenfreunde e. V. Platanenallee 37 D - 14050 BERLIN Tel.: 030/30 20 71-40/-41 Fax: 030/30 20 71 39 E-mail: bdg@kleingarten-bund.de Great Britain The National Society of Allotment and Leisure Gardeners Ltd. O'Dell House/Hunters Road GB - CORBY, Northants NN17 5JE Tel.: 01536 266576 Fax: 01536 264509 E-mail: natsoc@nsalg.demon.co.uk Luxembourg Ligue Luxembourgeoise du Coin de Terre et du Foyer 97, rue de Bonnevoie L - 1260 LUXEMBOURG Tel.: 48 01 99 Fax: 40 97 98 E-mail: liguectf@pt.lu Norway Norsk Kolonihageforbund Gronlandsleiret 23 N - 0190 OSLO Tel.: 22-17 23 71 Fax: 22-17 33 71 E-mail: forbundet@Kolonihager.no Poland Polski Zwiazek Dzialkow�w Krajowa Rada ul. Grzybowska 4 PL - 00-131 WARSZAWA Tel.: 22-6546232 Fax: 22-6206112 E-mail: krpzd@dzialkowiec.com.pl Sweden Svenska F�rbundet f�r Kolonitr�dgardar och Fritidsbyar �s�gatan 149 S - 116 32 STOCKHOLM Tel.: 8-74 30 090 Fax: 86 40 38 98 E-mail: leif.thorin@koloni.org Switzerland Schweizer Familieng�rtnerverband Sekretariat: z. Hd. von Frau Ruth STEINER St. Georgenstra. 71a CH - 9000 St. GALLEN Tel.: 41 71 222 98 26 Fax: 41 61 31 13 10 3 E-mail: ruth.steiner@dtc.ch Slovakia Slovensk� Zv�z Z�hradk�rov Republikov� V�bor Havlickova 34 SK - 817 02 BRATISLAVA Tel.: 7-54 77 54 22 Fax: 7-54 77 77 64 Finland Suomen Siirtolapuutarhaliitto ry Pengerkatu 9 B 39 SF - 00530 HELSINKI Tel.: 9-763 155 Fax: 9-763 125 E-mail: sgarden@siirtolapuutarhaliitto.fi France Ligue Francaise du Coin de Terre et du Foyer 11, rue Desprez F - 75014 PARIS Tel.: 1-45 40 40 45 Fax: 1-45 40 78 90 E-mail: c.denis@jardins.familiaux.asso.fr Netherlands Algemeen Verbond van Volkstuinders Verenigingen PO-Box 9094 NL - 3506 GB UTRECHT Tel.: 0031/346 561612 Fax: 0031-346 56 40 92 E-mail: info@avvn.nl Czechia Cesk� Zahr�dk�rsk� Svaz �stred� Rokycanova 15 CZ-130 00 PRAHA 3 - Zizkov Tel.: 2-22782710 Fax: 2-22782711 E-mail: zahradkari@vol.cz Austria Zentralverband der Kleing�rtner, Siedler und Kleintierz�chter �sterreichs Getreidemarkt 11/10 A - 1060 WIEN Tel.: 1-587 07 85 Fax: 1-587 07 85 30 E-mail: zvwien@chello.at
  17. 17. Hyphen 31 | 2003 34 editor: Office International du Coin de Terre et des Jardins Familiaux a.s.b.l. 20, rue de Bragance, L - 1255 Luxembourg date: Janurary 2003 concept and realisation: Bundesverband Deutscher Gartenfreunde e.V. editorship Malou Weirich, Office International layout/ dtp: Thomas Wagner, BDG source of pictures: Thomas Wagner, BDG, pages 21, 22, 23 (pictures 1 and 2): Larsen/ Backlund the Office online: www.jardins-familiaux.org

×