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I Couldve Been A Contender Branding Like A Challenger

How can you take on a category leader when you're a new brand or you have a fraction of the share? Not by being like them, but but being different. How to think and be like a challenger brand, and how to bring this alive in your strategy, design and amplification.

I Couldve Been A Contender Branding Like A Challenger

  1. 1. I
could’ve
been
a contender… Thinking
and
Being
like
a
Challenger By
Bianca
Cawthorne
  2. 2. Wherever
you
have
a
leader…
  3. 3. …you
have
someone
wanting
your
position
  4. 4. “Success
means
never
le.ng
the
compe44on define
you.
Instead
you
have
to
define
yourself based
on
a
point
of
view
you
care
deeply
about.” Tom
Chappell,
Tom’s
of
Maine
  5. 5. Leaders
in
the
market Reassure Reinforce
the
status
quo Paternalis4c Consumer‐centric
  6. 6. Leaders
provide
consumers
with… Simplicity
of
choice Reassurance
of
scale Ease
of
access Reliability Trust
  7. 7. Adam
Morgan
coined
the
phrase
‘Challenger
Brand’
  8. 8. challenge
vb. 1. to
invite
or
summon
to
a
contest 2. to
call
into
question
or
dispute 3. to
make
demands
on
or
stimulate 4. to
lay
claim
to 5. to
question
a
statement
or
fact What
does
challenger
mean?
  9. 9. So,
it
means
the
little
guy
against
the
Big
Guy…
  10. 10. challenge
vb. 1. to
invite
or
summon
to
a
contest 2. to
call
into
question
or
dispute 3. to
make
demands
on
or
stimulate 4. to
lay
claim
to 5. to
question
a
statement
or
fact Look
at
#5…
  11. 11. Challengers
are
able
to
succeed
against
a
dominant
leader
by questioning
their
leadership
&
strategy VS VS VS
  12. 12. Challengers
take
a
different
stance
to
Leaders Category
Leaders Challengers Disrupt Challenge
the
Status
Quo Adult
to
Adult
 Brand‐Centric Reassure Reinforce
the
status
quo Paternalis4c Consumer‐centric
  13. 13. Sometime
to
succeed,
you
need
to
act
like
a Challenger
Brand Not
a
Follower
Brand We
cannot
beat
the
#
1
in
your
category
by
being like
them
  14. 14. Creating
Challenger
Brands
  15. 15. What
you
need
to
do
to
develop
a
Challenger
brand 1. You
need
a
different
approach
to
the
market
leader
‐
but
you
don’t
always
have
to break
the
rules
of
the
category 2. It
isn’t
about
being
provocative
for
the
sake
of
it…you
need
to
have
a
grounded brand
idea 3. You
need
to
study
brands
outside
this
category 4. You
need
to
study
the
Challengers
in
those
categories
  16. 16. There
are
different
ways
that
you
can
challenge
the leaders
in
a
category Ra4onal Emo4onal Play
by Rules Break Rules Virgin
Atlan+c Stood
up
to
BA
by
being
beOer
than them
in
price
and
service Dyson Challenged
the
rules
of
vacuum cleaner
category
and
made
a
beOer product Mastercard Competed
with
Visa
by
providing
a more
emo4onal
voice
in
a func4onal
category Persil
/
Omo Challenged
the
rules
of
the
laundry category
by
focusing
on
the
posi4ve, rather
than
the
nega4ve
  17. 17. Virgin
Atlantic
–
We
cut
fares
not
quality Demonstrated
clear
values
of
quality
service
and
a
precise, entrepreneurial
image
‐
values
that
could
maintain
consumer loyalty,
even
in
a
price
war. The
first
airline
to
tell
the
truth
about
long‐haul
flying,
and
do something
about
correc4ng
its
inherent
discomfort
and
boredom.
  18. 18. Mastercard
‐
Some
Things
in
Life
are
Priceless Mastercard
launched
its
Priceless
campaign
in
2003
as
a
bid
to differen4ate
itself
from
Visa,
taking
a
more
emo4ve
posi4oning that
reflected
a
new,
less
ostenta4ous,
approach
to
wealth. The
campaign’s
messages
connected
more
deeply
with consumers
to
such
an
extent
they
spread
virally
and
were
even parodied,
giving
consumers
(and
the
banks)
the
social
confidence they
needed
in
order
to
trust
Mastercard.
  19. 19. Dyson
‐
Dyson
is
Different Before
Dyson,
consumers
didn't
pay
much
aOen4on
to
vacuum brands
or
floor‐care
technology.
The
category
was
clogged
with brands,
and
years
without
meaningful
innova4on
led
to
a
market flooded
with
cheap,
inferior
vacuum
products
that
pushed average
prices
down. Dyson
revolu4onized
and
reshaped
the
vacuum
category
by developing
truly
innova4ve
products
that
solved
problems
that consumers
thought
would
be
part
of
vacuum
cleaning
forever.
  20. 20. Persil
/
Omo
‐
Dirt
is
Good The
brand
idea
of
Dirt
is
Good
became
a
central
part
of communica4ons.
Dirty
clothes
demonstrate
your
child
is
curious, crea4ve,
exploring.

Persil’s
patented
technology
gives
your
child the
freedom
to
get
dirty,
safe
in
the
knowledge
that
the
brand can
remove
stains
easily. Persil
challenged
the
category
norm
that
most
people
think
that dirty
clothes
are
‘bad’
and
that
washing
clothes
is
a
4resome chore:
children
are
annoying
when
they
get
clothes
dirty
‐
but mums
don’t
want
to
hold
children
back
  21. 21. Designing
Challenger
Brands
  22. 22. How
do
Challenger
Brands
use
design? • To
make
a
powerful
statement
about
who
they
are • To
showcase
their
revolutionary
attitude
and
behaviour • To
dramatise
their
big
difference
from
all
the
others • To
create
new
codes
and
define
a
new
language
and
aesthetic • To
set
a
new
standard
for
others
to
follow
  23. 23. Crea4ng
an
Engaging
Personality
  24. 24. Being
Different
to
the
Rest
  25. 25. Marrying
Func4on
and
Aesthe4cs

  26. 26. Simplifying
Complex
Categories
  27. 27. Challenging
Design
Paradigms
  28. 28. Bringing
the
Brand
to
Life
  29. 29. Bringing
Challenger
Brands
to
Life
Beyond
the
Pack
  30. 30. “We
don’t
have
a
lot
of
money, so
we
are
going
to
have
to
think” Bill
Bernbach
  31. 31. Personal
service
at
Pret…through
to
personal
comment
cards
  32. 32. Burger
King
‘Have
it
Your
Way’…
On
door
stickers
  33. 33. …and
on
parking
spaces
  34. 34. Diesel
irreverence…
On
office
artwork…
  35. 35. …and
on
office
tables
  36. 36. Puccino’s
personality
…
On
coffee
cups
  37. 37. …and
on
sugar
sachets
  38. 38. Innocent’s
quirkiness…on
distribution
vans…
  39. 39. …and
on
promotional
packs
  40. 40. What
would
your
Genius
Bar
look
like?
  41. 41. Bianca
Cawthorne Butterfly
London 46
Brook
Road St
Margaret‘s TW1
1JE M:
+44
(0)
7866
806
367
(UK) M:
+971
(0)
55
288
7614
(UAE) bianca@butterflylondon.com Contact

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