Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

10 Principles to Build an Addictive Product and Service

There are about 2.6m apps on the Play Store. That’s 2 with six 0’s.
How do you drive users to start using your app, become engaged, gain value from it, and keep coming back?

10 Principles to Build an Addictive Product and Service

  1. 1. 10 Principles to Build an Addictive App Borrys Hasian Google Expert in Product Design Google Launchpad Global Mentor 29 Oct 2017
  2. 2. Top Three App Categories Used Daily
  3. 3. Source: TNS/Google, “Mobile App Usage Study,” 2016.
  4. 4. Source: TNS/Google, “Mobile App Usage Study,” 2016.
  5. 5. Source: TNS/Google, “Mobile App Usage Study,” 2016.
  6. 6. There are about 2.6m apps on the Play Store. That’s 2 with six 0’s. How do you drive users to start using your app, become engaged, gain value from it, and keep coming back?
  7. 7. Inspirations for the 10 Principles Don Norman’s three levels of processing: Visceral, Behavioral, and Reflective. Dieter Rams’s Ten Principles of Good Design. Tom Kelley’s Creative Confidence Jon Maeda’s Laws of Simplicity Alan Cooper’s Goal-Directed Design Nir Eyal’s Hook model
  8. 8. Source: jjg.net
  9. 9. Reflective Behavioral Visceral Self-image, personal satisfaction, memories Appearance, touch, and feel, sound Function, performance, usability, and simplicity. THREE LEVELS OF PROCESSING IN THE BRAIN
  10. 10. 10 Principles of Good Design Good design is aesthetic. Good design is unobtrusive. Good design is long-lasting. Good design makes a product understandable. Good design makes a product useful. Good design is innovative. Good design is thorough down to the last detail. Good design is as little design as possible. Good design is honest. Good design is environmentally friendly.Reflective Behavioral Visceral
  11. 11. Design Principles Summary Users' subjective reactions to the product's look, sound, smell/taste (if any). The ability of users to achieve the goals. Level of resource/effort consumed when doing tasks to achieve goals. Less but better. Focusing on the essential aspects that matter to the users. Users' subjective satisfaction or memory with the product. Good design is aesthetic. Good design is unobtrusive. Good design is long-lasting. Good design makes a product understandable. Good design makes a product useful. Good design is innovative. Good design is thorough down to the last detail. Good design is as little design as possible. Good design is honest. Good design is environmentally friendly.
  12. 12. eral ioral ctive Design Principles Users' subjective reactions to the product's look, sound, smell/taste (if any). The ability of users to achieve the goals. Level of resource/effort consumed when doing tasks to achieve goals. Less but better. Focusing on the essential aspects that matter to the users. Users' subjective satisfaction or memory with the product. 10. Looks and feels good up to the last detail. 9. Straight to the point. No fuzz. KISS. 8. Useful. 7. The right action at the right context. 6. Designed to be familiar (intuitive). 5. Drive conversions. 4. Trigger. 3. Makes users feel cool. 2. Not boring. 1. The right reason. The Why.
  13. 13. We’ll take Instagram as an example
  14. 14. Reflective
  15. 15. 1. The right reason. The Why.
  16. 16. Source: TNS/Google, “Mobile App Usage Study,” 2016.
  17. 17. Instagram is a simple way to capture and share the world’s moments.
  18. 18. Golden Circle Must watch talk by Simon Sinek: How great leaders inspire action
  19. 19. Source: TNS/Google, “Mobile App Usage Study,” 2016.
  20. 20. Who are your users? Law of diffusion of Innovation Source: Blog
  21. 21. Source: TNS/Google, “Mobile App Usage Study,” 2016.
  22. 22. Framing A method of presenting choices in specific ways to influence decision making and judgment. Tool Compare to ‘5% Fat’
  23. 23. 2. Not boring
  24. 24. Physio-pleasure Socio-pleasure Psycho-pleasure Ideo-pleasure Four pleasure framework by Prof. Lionel Tiger.
  25. 25. Socio-pleasure: Rewards of the tribe - gratification from others
  26. 26. Psycho-pleasure: Rewards of the hunt (material goods, money, or information)
  27. 27. 3. Makes users feel cool.
  28. 28. Rewards of the self (mastery, completion, competency, consistency)
  29. 29. ‘A bit of work’ from users, store value as data, content, followers, reputation, and skill.
  30. 30. Behavioral
  31. 31. 4. Trigger.
  32. 32. Example: External trigger from Facebook post
  33. 33. Source: TNS/Google, “Mobile App Usage Study,” 2016. Don’t just rely only on push notification
  34. 34. Source: TNS/Google, “Mobile App Usage Study,” 2016.
  35. 35. 5. Drive conversions.
  36. 36. Source: Google/Ipsos Consumers in the Micro-moment Survey, APAC - 2016
  37. 37. Hick’s Law The time it takes to make a decision increases with the number of options. Tool Reduce the number of options to reduce response times and errors.
  38. 38. 6. Designed to be Familiar (Intuitive)
  39. 39. Doing is easier than thinking
  40. 40. Usability Testing - Validate with the real users, not with your internal teams.
  41. 41. Affordance The physical characteristics of a thing influence its function and use. Tool
  42. 42. 7. The right action/info at the right context.
  43. 43. Source: Google/Ipsos Consumers in the Micro-moment Survey, APAC - 2016
  44. 44. Source: Think With Google Micro-moments Occur when people reflexively turn to a device — to act on a need to learn something, do something, discover something, watch something, or buy something. They are intent-rich moments when decisions are made and preferences shaped.
  45. 45. Link to Video
  46. 46. Inattentional Blindness A failure to perceive an unexpected stimulus presented in clear view. Tool
  47. 47. Horror Vacui A tendency to fill blank spaces with things rather than leaving spaces empty. Tool The perceived value of a store’s window is inversely related to its
  48. 48. 8. Useful
  49. 49. Source: Google/Ipsos Consumers in the Micro-moment Survey, 2015 Only 9% of users will stay on a mobile site or app if it doesn’t satisfy their needs (for example, to find information or navigate quickly).
  50. 50. 9. Straight to the point. No fuzz. KISS.
  51. 51. Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away. - Antoine de Saint-Exupery
  52. 52. 80/20 Rule A high percentage of effects in any large system is caused by a low percentage of variables. Tool 20% of what people want: portability and tape playback.
  53. 53. Performance Load The mental and physical effort required to complete a task. When performance load is high, time and errors increase. Tool Cognitive load: reduce information density, reduce mental effort (recognize than recall), automate task when possible. Kinetic load: reduce number of steps, reduce physical effort, automate task when possible.
  54. 54. Visceral
  55. 55. 10. Looks and feels good up to the last detail.
  56. 56. Aesthetic-Usability Effect Aesthetic things are perceived to be easier to use than ugly things. Tool See the research Experiment in the 90s by Japanese researchers.
  57. 57. Black Effect A set of cognitive and behavioral effects triggered by exposure to the color black. Tool Black products are generally perceived to be classy, high value, and timeless.
  58. 58. How do we do it?
  59. 59. Innovation is the sweetspot
  60. 60. Design Sprint to the rescue!
  61. 61. Design sprint is a framework for teams of any size to solve and test ideas in 2-5 days.
  62. 62. Google Design Sprint 1-Why 2-Pleasure 3-Coolness 4-Trigger 5-Conversions 6-Intuitive7-Right action 8-Useful 9-Simplicity
  63. 63. Understanding users, business, and technology. Define focus and key strategy. Sketches, and decide. Prototype and validate.
  64. 64. How do we measure the success of the design?
  65. 65. HEART Framework from Google. Resource: How to choose the right UX metrics for your product.
  66. 66. eral ioral ctive ED Score (Emotional Design Score) Users' subjective reactions to the product's look, sound, smell/taste (if any). The ability of users to achieve the goals. Level of resource/effort consumed when doing tasks to achieve goals. Less but better. Focusing on the essential aspects that matter to the users. Users' subjective satisfaction or memory with the product. 1. I think the product looks good. 2. I found that the product was easy to learn. 3. I could achieve my goals easily. 4. I found the features of the product satisfy my needs. 5. I found that the product is troublesome to use. 6. I felt that the performance of the product is good. 7. I felt that the product is complicated. 8. I felt good when using the product. 9. I think I would use the product again in the future. 10. I would recommend the product to my friends/family.
  67. 67. ED SCALE Strongly disagree Strongly agree 1 2 3 4 5 1. I think the product looks good. 2. I found that the product was easy to learn. 3. I could achieve my goals easily. 4. I found the features of the product satisfy my needs. 5. I found that the product is troublesome to use. 6. I felt that the performance of the product is good. 7. I felt that the product is complicated. 8. I felt good when using the product. 9. I think I would use the product again in the future. 10. I would recommend the product to my friends/family.
  68. 68. For 1,2,3,4,6,8,9,10 Temp Score = Scale -1 ED Score Calculation For 5, 7 Temp Score = 5 - Scale ED Score = Sum of Temp Score x 2.5
  69. 69. “Less but better” product that’s engaging, useful, and making people’s lives better and easier.
  70. 70. ありがとう Borrys Hasian Google Expert in Product Design Google Launchpad Global Mentor borrys@circleux.com twitter @borryshasian In Progress The Book of UX Design, in Indonesia Language: www.belajarux.com

×