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Constructivism

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Constructivism

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Constructivism

  1. 1. Constructivism An Educational Philosophy
  2. 2. Key Concepts of Constructivism • Learning is an active process • Students will learn by doing • Previous knowledge is built upon • Links are formed between new and existing knowledge • Past experiences and Cultural influences play a part in the learning process
  3. 3. Constructivism Theorists
  4. 4. Constructivism Theorist: Jean Piaget Cognitive Learning Theory  Children think differently than adults  Children are naturally active learners  Children do not need motivation from adults to learn  Children construct and store new knowledge while moving through different cognitive stages. Jean Piaget August 9, 1896 – September 16, 1980
  5. 5. Constructivism Theorist: Lev Vygotsky Social Cognition  Learning takes place with the context of a child’s social development and culture  Children learn by interacting with each other and their environment Scaffolding  Important to discover the level of each child’s development and construct learning plans from that point. Schemata  Organized way of developing an educational construct for remembering and understanding information Lev Vygotsky November 17, 1896 – June 11, 1934
  6. 6. Zone of Proximal Development Important part of Social Constructivism Describes the areas between what a child can do independently, with assistance, and potential skills.
  7. 7. The Constructivist Teacher  Serves as a resource that facilitates learning  Tailors the lessons to the learning experience of the child  Encourages exploration The constructivist teacher facilitates learners' interactions with hands-on and self-directed learning activities
  8. 8. Constructivist Classroom vs. Traditional Classroom Constructivist Classroom  Students work primarily in groups to build knowledge  Curriculum focused on bigger concept  Students encouraged to question  Students considered be thinkers with own theories about the world  Learning measured through observation, student work, and portfolios Traditional Classroom  Typically student work alone  Curriculum focused on basic skills  Strict curriculum adherence  Students considered blank slates  Learning measured by testing
  9. 9. Constructivism Pros  Students enjoy being a part of the learning process  Higher level of thinking  Hands on activities  Students take ownership of learning Cons  Student not always willing to discover new knowledge  Lack of teacher responsibility  Conflict within groups
  10. 10. Why I Picked This Education Philosophy As I teacher I would definitely apply many of the constructivist methods in the classroom. As I have gone through my schooling I found that it was much easier to learn a new skill by doing rather than just being told. I feel that it connects the learner with the actual skill by being able to apply it. To be an educator that is able to encourage kids to critically think and analyze what they are working on resulting in a higher level of knowledge is exciting to me.
  11. 11. References • Constructivism: Roles of Teacher and Learner. (2012, March 14). Retrieved June 16, 2015, from https://constructivismandexistentialism.wordpress.com/2012/03/14/constructivism- roles-of-teacher-and-learner/ • Piaget's Theory on Constructivism. (n.d.). Retrieved June 16, 2015, from http://www.teach-nology.com/currenttrends/constructivism/piaget/ • Samoberle. (n.d.). Retrieved June 16, 2015, from https://samoberle.wordpress.com • Vygotskian Approach - Tools of the Mind. (n.d.). Retrieved June 16, 2015, from http://www.toolsofthemind.org/philosophy/vygotskian-approach/ • Zone of Proximal Development and Scaffolding - Tools of the Mind. (n.d.). Retrieved June 16, 2015, from http://www.toolsofthemind.org/philosophy/scaffolding/

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