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Globalization leadership and improvement in schools chris green - day 1-session2

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Globalization leadership and improvement in schools chris green - day 1-session2

  1. 1. Christopher Green Executive Director Schools Review Unit NAQQAET Kingdom of Bahrain© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  2. 2. MACRO MICRO The macro level Political and Economic Improvement culture commitment in systems will micro Leadership and Improvement Similar social circumstances management challenge is in schools local© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  3. 3. at both macro and micro levels School improvement Positive change in the personal behaviour & academic achievement of students Leading and Teaching that managing brings about real schools learning effectively© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  4. 4. Lecture 10% Reading 20% Audiovisual Average student 30% Demonstration retention rates 50% Discussion 75% Practise doing 90% Teach others© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  5. 5. Apart from information technology, what has had significant impact on improving the quality of education in schools in the last five years?© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  6. 6. Systematic school review Incisive school leadership Student-focused teaching & learning© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  7. 7. SOURCES FOR THESE ANSWERS 1. Policy and practice in improving school leadership, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Vol. 1 & 2 2008 Lessons in leadership development, Barber, M. 2010 Education systems keep getting better McKinsey & Co, 2010 2. Highly effective schools in ten systems, Chris Green, 2012© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  8. 8. SOURCE 1 OECD, BARBER AND MCKINSEY 22 systems in 19 countries SOURCE 2 CHRIS GREEN 10 systems in 9 countries© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  9. 9. SOURCE 2 A LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF HIGHLY EFFECTIVE SCHOOLS IN TEN SYSTEMS England Sweden USA UAE Saudi Arabia Tanzania (Abu Dhabi & Dubai) Kingdom of India New Zealand Bahrain© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  10. 10. Wymondham College, Norfolk, England© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  11. 11. Thomas Telford School, Shropshire, England© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  12. 12. Greensward Academy, Essex, England© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  13. 13. Walsall Academy, Walsall, England© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  14. 14. St. Christopher’s School, Bahrain© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  15. 15. British School, Bahrain© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  16. 16. Hutteen Primary Boys’ School, Bahrain© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  17. 17. Rabe’aa Primary Girls School, Bahrain© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  18. 18. Khawla Secondary Girls School, Bahrain© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  19. 19. Um Salama Intermediate Girls School, Bahrain© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  20. 20. British School, Riyadh, KSA© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  21. 21. Bhavan British School, Baroda, India© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  22. 22. Tweedsmuir School, Invercargill, New Zealand© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  23. 23. Kunskapsskolan School, Stockholm, Sweden© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  24. 24. Al Ain Junior School, Abu Dhabi© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  25. 25. Cambridge High School, Abu Dhabi© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  26. 26. Tarpon Springs Culinary School, Florida, USA.© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  27. 27. Albuqueque Academy, New Mexico, USA© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  28. 28. Mvumi Secondary School, Dodoma, Tanzania© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  29. 29. MICRO MACRO© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  30. 30. © The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  31. 31. © The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  32. 32. © The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  33. 33. © The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  34. 34. © The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  35. 35. Local adaptation© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  36. 36. Accurate school review is critical as the informant of priorities for improvement Regular and frequent Rigorous school self- external review to evaluation as routine benchmark and in-school moderate school management self-evaluation© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  37. 37. vision action can do Change© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  38. 38. Outstanding leadership at a range of levels is the ‘key’ to sustaining improvements© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  39. 39. The must be leading learning inside conventional classrooms and© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  40. 40. is where there is direct and practical leadership of learning inclusive, distributed and within a culture of lifelong learning in and out of school© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  41. 41. What are the salient issues to address? What does leadership need to do to be outstanding?© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  42. 42. Bahrain Schools Bahrain Centre Agenda of Excellence Ministry of Education National criteria Strategies for leadership (particularly Literacy & Numeracy) performance Tracking Comprehensive students’ performance progress data© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  43. 43. CYCLE 1 CYCLE 2© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  44. 44. CYCLE 1 CYCLE 2© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  45. 45. CYCLE 1 CYCLE 2© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  46. 46. CYCLE 1 BOYS SCHOOLS Figure 3: Overall effectiveness – comparing boys’ schools in Cycles 1 and 2 1 13 53 36 2008-2011 103 schools 1% 13% 51% 35% (Cycle 1) 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 1-Outstanding 2-Good 3-Satisfactory 4-Inadequate GIRLS SCHOOLS 6 47 41 5 2008-2011 99 schools 6% 48% 41% 5% (Cycle 1) 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 1-Outstanding 2-Good 3-Satisfactory 4-Inadequate© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  47. 47. © The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  48. 48. By improving schools’ self-evaluation and identifying priorities for action© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  49. 49. 51% 48% 50% 39% 40% 33% 30% 27% 26% 25% 24% 20% Exact 1 Point Difference 10% 2 Points Difference 10% 3 Points Difference 4% 0% -1% -6% -6% -10% 2008-2011 2008-2011 2011-2012 202 schools 51 schools 51 schools in Cycle 1 in Cycle 1 in Cycle 2© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  50. 50. leadership hierarchy empowerment control accountability secrecy transparency bureaucracy strategic action blame learning development© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  51. 51. learning assessment-based subjectivity learning analysis synthesis fragmentation coherent purpose administrative focus learning focus passive attendance active learning© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  52. 52. Examination Boys’ and girls’ validity & achievement reliability Distributed Lifelong learning leadership culture© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  53. 53. personal trusting responsibility relationships formative assessment as central reflective passion for practice and improvement appraisal© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  54. 54. But always within a culture of Students’ focused learning© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  55. 55. from Effective leadership is about moving people Delivery mindsets to Learning mindsets with Consequent action© The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET
  56. 56. © The views expressed in this presentation are those of the speaker’s, and not the NAQQAET

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