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Schiffman cb10 ppt_08

  1. 1. CHAPTER EIGHT Consumer AttitudeFormation and Change
  2. 2. Learning Objectives1. To Understand What Attitudes Are, How They Are Learned, as Well as Their Nature and Characteristics.2. To Understand the Composition and Scope of Selected Models of Attitudes.3. To Understand How Experience Leads to the Initial Formation of Consumption-Related Attitudes.4. To Understand the Various Ways in Which Consumers’ Attitudes Are Changed.5. To Understand How Consumers’ Attitudes Can Lead to Behavior and How Behavior Can Lead to Attitudes. Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 2
  3. 3. What Is Your Attitude Toward the Product Advertised? What Is Your Attitude Toward the Ad Itself? Are the Two Attitudes Similar or Different? Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 3
  4. 4. You May Have Liked the Product but Disliked the Ad or Vice VersaCopyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 4
  5. 5. A learned predisposition to behave in a consistently Attitude favorable or unfavorable manner with respect to a given object.Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 5
  6. 6. What Are Attitudes?• The attitude “object”• Attitudes are a learned predisposition• Attitudes have consistency• Attitudes occur within a situationCopyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 6
  7. 7. What Information Does This Ad Provide to Assist Consumers in Forming Attitudes Toward the Saturn Vue Hybrid?Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 7
  8. 8. It is Stylish, Safe, and Good for the EnvironmentCopyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 8
  9. 9. Structural Models of Attitudes• Tricomponent Attitude Model• Multiattribute Attitude Model• The Trying-to-Consume Model• Attitude-Toward-the-Ad Model Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 9
  10. 10. A Simple Representation of the Tricomponent Attitude Model - Figure 8.3 Cognition Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 10
  11. 11. The Tricomponent Model Components The knowledge and perceptions that are • Cognitive acquired by a • Affective combination of direct experience with the • Conative attitude object and related information from various sourcesCopyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 11
  12. 12. The Tricomponent Model Components A consumer’s • Cognitive emotions or feelings about a particular • Affective product or brand • ConativeCopyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 12
  13. 13. The Tricomponent Model Components The likelihood or • Cognitive tendency that an • Affective individual will undertake a specific • Conative action or behave in a particular way with regard to the attitude objectCopyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 13
  14. 14. Discussion Questions• Explain your attitude toward your college/university based on the tricomponent attribute model.• Be sure to isolate the cognitive, affective, and conative elements.Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 14
  15. 15. Attitude models that examine the Multiattribute composition of Attitude consumer attitudes Models in terms of selected product attributes or beliefs.Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 15
  16. 16. Multiattribute Attitude Models Types• The attitude-toward- • Attitude is function of object model the presence of certain• The attitude-toward- beliefs or attributes. behavior model • Useful to measure• Theory-of-reasoned- attitudes toward action model product and service categories or specific brands.Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 16
  17. 17. Multiattribute Attitude Models Types• The attitude-toward- • Is the attitude toward object model behaving or acting with• The attitude-toward- respect to an object, behavior model rather than the attitude• Theory-of-reasoned- toward the object itself action model • Corresponds closely to actual behaviorCopyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 17
  18. 18. Consumer Characteristics, Attitude, and Online ShoppingCopyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 18
  19. 19. Multiattribute Attitude Models Types• The attitude-toward- • Includes cognitive, object model affective, and conative• The attitude-toward- components behavior model • Includes subjective• Theory-of-reasoned- norms in addition to action model attitudeCopyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 19
  20. 20. A Simplified Version of the Theory of Reasoned Action - Figure 8.5Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 20
  21. 21. Discussion Question• Now use the theory of reasoned action to describe your attitude toward your college/university when deciding on which school to attend.Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 21
  22. 22. An attitude theory designed to account for the many cases Theory of where the action or Trying to outcome is not certain Consume but instead reflects the consumer’s attempt to consume (or purchase).Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 22
  23. 23. Selected Examples of Potential Impediments That Might Impact Trying - Table 8.7 Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 23
  24. 24. A model that proposes that a consumer forms various feelings (affects) and judgments Attitude- (cognitions) as the result of exposure to an Toward-the- advertisement, which, in Ad Model turn, affect the consumer’s attitude toward the ad and attitude toward the brand.Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 24
  25. 25. A Conception of the Relationship AmongElements in an Attitude-Toward-the-Ad Model - Figure 8.6Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 25
  26. 26. Issues in Attitude Formation• How attitudes are learned – Conditioning and experience – Knowledge and beliefsCopyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 26
  27. 27. How Does a Favorably Known Brand Name Impact the Formation of Consumer Attitudes Toward a New Product? Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 27
  28. 28. There is Stimulus Generalization From the Lean Cuisine Brand Names to the New Product. Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 28
  29. 29. Issues in Attitude Formation• Sources of influence on attitude formation – Personal experience – Influence of family – Direct marketing and mass media• Personality factorsCopyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 29
  30. 30. How Does a Cents- Off Coupon Impact Consumers’ Attitudes? Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 30
  31. 31. New Customers Will Try the Product,Existing Customers will be Rewarded. Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 31
  32. 32. Strategies of Attitude ChangeCopyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 32
  33. 33. Changing the Basic Motivational FunctionCopyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 33
  34. 34. Why and How Does This Ad Appeal to the Utilitarian Function? Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 34
  35. 35. The Product is Green and Works asWell or Better than Other Products. Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 35
  36. 36. Which Lifestyle- Related Attitudes Are Expressed or Reflected in This Ad? Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 36
  37. 37. Healthy Eating and Snacking Lifestyle Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 37
  38. 38. How Does This Ad Provide Information to Establish or Reinforce Consumer Attitudes? Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 38
  39. 39. It Raises the Question About UVA Rays andthen Provides Information on Sun Protection. Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 39
  40. 40. Discussion Questions • What products that you purchase associate themselves with an Admired Group or Event? • When does it personally influence your purchasing?Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 40
  41. 41. How Is Fiji Water’s Link to an Environmental Cause Likely to Impact Consumers’ Attitudes Toward Its Product?Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 41
  42. 42. They Might Have a More Favorable Attitude.Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 42
  43. 43. Attitude Change • Altering Components of the Multiattribute Model – Changing relative evaluation of attributes – Changing brand beliefs – Adding an attribute – Changing the overall brand rating • Changing Beliefs about Competitors’ BrandsCopyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 43
  44. 44. How Is This New Benefit Likely to ImpactConsumers’ Attitudes Toward the Product? Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 44
  45. 45. The Consumer Will Have a More PositiveAttitude Overall from the New Attribute. Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 45
  46. 46. How Is the Absence of an Ingredient Likely to Lead to a Favorable Attitude Toward a Product? Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 46
  47. 47. When It Was An Unfavorable AttributeCopyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 47
  48. 48. Which Attitude Change Strategy Is Depicted in This Ad?Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 48
  49. 49. Changing the Overall Brand RatingCopyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 49
  50. 50. How Is Valvoline’s Attempt to Change AttitudesToward a Competing Brand Likely to Impact Attitudes Toward Its Own Brand? Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 50
  51. 51. By Showing Better Wear Protection Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 51
  52. 52. Customer attitudes are Elaboration changed by two Likelihood distinctly different Model routes to persuasion: (ELM) a central route or a peripheral route.Copyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 52
  53. 53. Elaboration Likelihood ModelCopyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 53
  54. 54. Behavior Can Precede or Follow Attitude FormationCopyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 54
  55. 55. Issues in Attribution Theory• Self-Perception Theory – Foot-in-the-Door Technique• Attributions toward Others• Attributions toward Things• How We Test Our Attributions – Distinctiveness – Consistency over time – Consistency over modality – ConsensusCopyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 55
  56. 56. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic,mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher. Printed in the United States of America. Copyright © 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice HallCopyright 2010 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter Eight Slide 56
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