Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

of

MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 1 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 2 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 3 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 4 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 5 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 6 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 7 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 8 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 9 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 10 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 11 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 12 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 13 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 14 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 15 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 16 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 17 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 18 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 19 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 20 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 21 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 22 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 23 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 24 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 25 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 26 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 27 MODO NYC - Press Kit Slide 28
Upcoming SlideShare
The H(app)athon Project Media/Press Kit
Next
Download to read offline and view in fullscreen.

0 Likes

Share

Download to read offline

MODO NYC - Press Kit

Download to read offline

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all
  • Be the first to like this

MODO NYC - Press Kit

  1. 1. jessekeyes.modo@gmail.com P R E S S K I T
  2. 2. INFO MODO PRESS KIT 2011
  3. 3. BUSINESS MODO PRESS KIT 2011 Jesse Keyes founded Modo to design and develop creative businesses that facilitate a balanced, pleasurable and productive life. A spatially oriented “architecture for living” undergirds Modo’s hospitality, culinary and fashion functions. www.oneseventh.com www.griffou.com www.karolinazmarlak.com
  4. 4. PRESS MODO PRESS KIT 2011
  5. 5. MODO PRESS KIT 2011KAROLINA ZMARLAK PRESS KIT 2010
  6. 6. MODO PRESS KIT 2011
  7. 7. MODO PRESS KIT 2011
  8. 8. MODO PRESS KIT 2011 &(-.'/-&0$ (1'$ -($ ,/'%#-&0$ (('(+$ (3''*$ #/"4('/($ %&.$ ,*'#(9$ $ :;'<'/(-7-3-#)$ =%($ '&0-&0$ -&$ #1'$ 7'0-&&-&0+$ #/"&0'/$%&.$7'##'/9$$A<'/)$ B#1"401#B"4#$ %&.$ ='33B #3'$ .'#%-3C2-2-&0+$ #/-@+$ &,/0$+ "1+ %.%2)+ -'!%#&+ ">$#1'$0%/@'&#9D $ G/->>"4$ &"('$ #"$ >%7/-,$ &0+$ %.@-/-&0+$ %&.$ #/)-&0$ %*$="43.$'&.$42$"&'$">$ $#"$J&"=$,%#'0"/)9$$!"#$ E$/'%3-K'$ 1'/$ :,"&<'/#-73'$ "&.$ #1'$ 4(4%3$ .'(-0&'/L($ 'L$ "/$ M4&B(&%2$ #1'$ ,"33%/$ 3)$,"&(#/4,#'.$2-','($#1%#$ 4&0$6(,%/$.'$3%$;'&#%$"/$ 3)$%&.$#'Q#4/'.$=-#1$84(#$ 42/#5 ?3'D$ 0/"42$ %&.$ #1'$ (%#-&$ .$(*-/#($%/'$%33$/'<'/(-73'+$ 9$ $ R33$ 73%,*$ =%>O'$ (-3*$ ($ ='33+$ =1-3'$ #1'$ =%>O'$ $/2&+ 2%.%2'%+ &"+ &,%+ '-&/0+ #1'$@-33'>'4-33'$2-','($%/'$ '$ @%.'$ >/"@$ 0%K%/$ %&.$ 4#->43$./'(('(+$/'<'/(-73'$"/$ 3-#)$-($-&$#1'$.'#%-3(T$>%7/-,$ -&$ /-77"&+$ %."/&@'&#($ 3-&'$ #1'$ ,"33',#-"&9$ $ N1'$ 1'$ ='%/'/$ #"$ (&%2$ #1'$ ,'($ #"$ ='%/$ #1'$ 2-','$ -&$ &+$E$@)('3>$/%/'3)$(''$@)$ )$-#$-($@''#-&0(+$&-01##-@'+$ '&#(9$ $ E$ ,"&(#%&#3)$ &''.$ ,/'%#'9D$ V%-.$ J%/"3-&%$ -&$ &$%$W'.&'(.%)$@"/&-&09$$ :X3"#1-&0$&''.($#"$('/<'$@43#-23'$24/2"('(9$$R#$#1'$ 2/-,'$2"-&#$#1%#$='$%/'+$='$&''.$#"$7'$,%/'>43$=-#1$ 1"=$='$2/'('&#$#1'$2/".4,#9$$E$="/*$=-#1$7/-33-%&#$ 2%##'/&$@%*'/(9$$N1'/'$-($%$=1"3'$#'%@$#1%#$-($#/)-&0$ #"$?04/'$#1-($=1"3'$3""*$%&.$/'<'/(-7-3-#)$"4#9$$E$ 1%<'$'Q,'33'&#$2%##'/&$@%*'/($%&.$='$84(#$#/)$4&#-3$ ='$0'#$-#$/-01#9D$ U'(,/-7-&0$=1"$(1'$(''($='%/-&0$#1'('$0%/@'&#(+$ #1'$(%@'$#1"/"401&'(($-($'<-.'&,'.9$$:N1'$="@%&$ 1%($ %$ <'/)$ (#/"&0$ ('3>B%=%/'&'((9$ $ I"/$ &"=$ #1%#$ 4(4%33)$ 1%22'&($ #"$ 7'$ %$ ="@'&$ =1"$ ="/*($ -&$ %$ ,/'%#-<'$ ?'3.$ 7',%4('$ (1'$ ="43.$ %22/',-%#'$ #1'$"/0%&-K%#-"&$">$1"=$#1-&0($%/'$@%.'9$$N-3.%$ V=-&#"&$,"@'($#"$@-&.+$%&.$-($%$0/'%#$-&(2-/%#-"&$ #"$@'$7',%4('$(1'$1%($%$,3'%/B,4#$<-(-"&$">$=1"$ (1'$-($%&.$=1%#$(1'$,1""('($#"$7'$%$2%/#$">9$$E#$-($ -66+-4"*&+&,%+#,"/#%+-09+'"!,/'&/#-&/"0+"1+'&)6%5++:&+ -($#1'$=%)$(1'$='%/($#1-&0(+$-#$-(&L#$%7"4#$#1'$2-','$ "/$#1'$.'(-0&'/9$$E$=%&#$#1'$="@%&$=1"$='%/($@)$ ,3"#1'($#"$1%<'$#1%#$(%@'$('&('$">$('3>9D W1%#$(1'$1%($'&.'.$42$=-#1$-($%$V2/-&0YV4@@'/$ ,"33',#-"&$ #1%#$ -&>4('($ ,3%((-,$ >'@-&-&'$ (-31"4'##'($ =-#1$%$5%2%&'('$-&O4'&,'9$$W1-3'$%3=%)($2/'('&#$-&$ 1'/$3%7'3+$$#1-($#-@'$9$H@%/3%*$(#%/#'.$3""*-&0$%#$5%2%&$ -&$ ,"//'3%#-"&$ =-#1$ #1'$ !'4/"@%&,'/$ @"<-'+$ ,43#$ "7('((-"&($=-#1$,)7'/(2%,'+$%&.$>4#4/-(#-,$#1'"/-'($ ">$ #/%<'3-&0$ =-#1"4#$ @"<-&09$ $ N1'$ #/%.-#-"&($ ">$ 5%2%&$%/'$%22%/'&#C#1'$21)(-,%3$3-&'($-&$#1'$.'(-0&+$ #6%-0+-09+4"69;+!-&&%20'+-09+'6%%.%'+-2%+4-'%9+"0+ *-@"&"(9$ R&"#1'/$ #1'@'$ ">$ #1'$ ,"33',#-"&$ -($ #1'$ 1-01B=%-(#'.$ 74773'$ (*-/#$ (-31"4'##'($ %&.$ 2'0$ 3'0$ #/"4('/($">$#1'$@".$Z[](9$$X"@7-&-&0$#1"('$#="$ -.'%(+$#1'$*-@"&"($%&.$M]($@".+$-($=1%#$@%*'($42$ #1'$3""*$>"/$#1'$('%("&T$,3'%&$3-&'(+$)'(+$74#$@"/'$">$ #1'$7"3.'/+$/"4&.'.$(-31"4'##'9$$N1'$(#/4,#4/'$">$#1'$ &',*3-&'($-($<'/)$,3'%&$74#$>4&&'3'.^$,"<'/%0'$=-#1$%$ "2'&&'((9$$!"$/'>'/'&,'$-($#""$3-#'/%3+$&"/$-($#1'$2"2$ ">$,"3"/$#""$7"3.+$=-#1$7/-01#$>4,1(-%$%&.$/'.+$,1'//)$ 73"(("@$O"/%3$2%##'/&($"&$=1-#'$(-3*9 +(+'$,-(./,(0$#+1((2"3&'4(4#"56"7/5(8#$*(9:;<( ("(3&/,?$&'7(7="7(&-(@$7=(-7#6A76#"%%B(-$6'5("'5(-$A&"%%B( ,"'7(?#/77B(A%$7=/-(7="7(7=/B(A"'(,$#+("'5(?%"B(&'1((D$( $-.%-/$%/&-%0&,$%1/$0%+2(3$*1"4!$5%%67%"("1"&!!8%92*#$,%"(% "5/E7$E*/"-6#/(#/"%*(8$#(,$*/'>-(/3/'&'4(,/"#1(((C&7=( A$'$*B<(,/(="5(7$(A$'-&5/#(=$,(7$(/3$%3/(7=/(A$%%/A7&$'(8$#( 7(A%&/'7(,=$(="-(-//'(/3/#B7=&'4(&'(7=/(%6G6#B(*"#+/7H (&5/"(&'(#/"5BE7$E,/"#1((I$'3/#7&@&%&7B1J @ABC((K=$7$4#"?=B(@B$56R!!R$N6N6_EXE %&'"()*"#%"! :R#$#1'$'&.$">$#1'$.%)+$E$#1-&*$=-#1$,3'%&$#%-3"/-&0$ %&.$<'/)$(#/4,#4/'.$(-31"4'##'(+$E$1%<'$%$#'&.'&,)$ #"$0"$#"$.%/*'/$,"3"/(+$74#$#"$@'+$-&8',#-&0$%$3-##3'$ 7-#$ ">$ 7"3.$ ,"3"/+$ %$ #"4,1$ ">$ ("@'#1-&0$ <'/)$ (#/"&0+$-(&L#$%$/-(*$-&$#1'$34Q4/)$@%/*'#9$$E&$>%,#$-#$-($ (#-33$<'/)$='%/%73'$%&.$=1%#$@%*'($#1'$2-','($>''3$ &'=$%&.$'Q,-#-&0$%($#1'$='%#1'/$=%/@($429$$N1'$ 0%/@'&#($7',"@'$/'<'/(-73'$%&.$@%&)$0"$7%,*$#"$ 73%,*$("$"4/$,"3"/$-#$-(&L#$(4,1$%$/-(*$>"/$%$@".'/&$ ="@%&9D$$J%/"3-&%$'Q23%-&(9 R&.$ #1'$ .'(-0&'/$ 1%($ 1%.$ ("@'$ 0"".$ /"3'$ @".'3($>"/$@".'/&$#1-&*-&0+$2/'<-"4(3)$="/*-&0$ >"/$X%/"3-&%$F'//'/%+$N1'"/)$%&.$`;$,"&(43#-&09$$ C-#,+ 8"4+ &-*3,&+ ,%2+ -4"*&+ 9/11%2%0&+ -'!%#&'+ "1+ #',1&-S4'+$ .'#%-3-&0+$ %&.$ 74(-&'((9$ $ W%#,1-&0$ #1'$ 2/',-(-"&$ ">$ 1'/$ 2%(#$ '@23")'/($ /'%33)$ 0%<'$ J%/"3-&%$ %$ 3'0$ 42$ "&$ #1'$ !'=$ a"/*$ >%(1-"&$ ,"@2'#-#-"&9$$:I/"@$#1'$@-&4#'$E$(#%/#'.$%#$IEN$E$ ="43.$#%*'$"&$-&#'/&(1-2($#1%#$='/'&L#$&','((%/-3)$ %7"4#$#1'$.'(-0&$%'(#1'#-,$E$=%&#'.$#"$>"33"=9$$b)$ ?/(#$-&#'/&(1-2$=%($>"/$`;$,"&(43#-&0$#"$3'#$@'$ *&"=$1"=$#1'$"<'/%33$74(-&'(($="/*(9$$$N1'"/)$ -($%$<'/)$7-0$,"@2%&)$%&.$E$="43.$(2'&.$1"4/($ =%#,1-&0$#1'$#%-3"/-&0$?##-&0(9$N1'"/)$-($%33$%7"4#$ #1'$ (2',-?,$ ?#$ ">$ #1'$ c]$ .->>'/'&#$ 2%&#($ #1')$ 1%<'9$ $ N1%#L($ =1%#$ #1')$ 7',%@'$ 0/'%#$ -&d$ #1'$ 2%&#(+$#1'$e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f;_$3-&*($#1%#$("@'#-@'($ ."&L#$2/"2'/3)$'Q'@23->)$=1%#$#1'-/$#/4'$<-(-"&$-(9$$ g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spring 2011 : the ddd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`;$,"&(43#-&09$$ C-#,+ 8"4+ &-*3,&+ ,%2+ -4"*&+ 9/11%2%0&+ -'!%#&'+ "1+ #',1&-S4'+$ .'#%-3-&0+$ %&.$ 74(-&'((9$ $ W%#,1-&0$ #1'$ 2/',-(-"&$ ">$ 1'/$ 2%(#$ '@23")'/($ /'%33)$ 0%<'$ J%/"3-&%$ %$ 3'0$ 42$ "&$ #1'$ !'=$ a"/*$ >%(1-"&$ ,"@2'#-#-"&9$$:I/"@$#1'$@-&4#'$E$(#%/#'.$%#$IEN$E$ ="43.$#%*'$"&$-&#'/&(1-2($#1%#$='/'&L#$&','((%/-3)$ %7"4#$#1'$.'(-0&$%'(#1'#-,$E$=%&#'.$#"$>"33"=9$$b)$ ?/(#$-&#'/&(1-2$=%($>"/$`;$,"&(43#-&0$#"$3'#$@'$ *&"=$1"=$#1'$"<'/%33$74(-&'(($="/*(9$$$N1'"/)$ -($%$<'/)$7-0$,"@2%&)$%&.$E$="43.$(2'&.$1"4/($ =%#,1-&0$#1'$#%-3"/-&0$?##-&0(9$N1'"/)$-($%33$%7"4#$ #1'$ (2',-?,$ ?#$ ">$ #1'$ c]$ .->>'/'&#$ 2%&#($ #1')$ 1%<'9$ $ N1%#L($ =1%#$ #1')$ 7',%@'$ 0/'%#$ -&d$ #1'$ 2%&#(+$#1'$e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f;_$3-&*($#1%#$("@'#-@'($ ."&L#$2/"2'/3)$'Q'@23->)$=1%#$#1'-/$#/4'$<-(-"&$-(9$$ g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chapter four 129 spring 2011 : the ddd128the ddd : spring 2011 D7B%&'4L(!"#$"%&'"()*+",1
  9. 9. MODO PRESS KIT 2011 Emerging Designers, New York 22 May, 2009 by Robert Cordero, Contributing Editor Karolina Zmarlak | Transformational value The ever-morphing Barcelona dress, courtesy of Karolina Zmarlak NEW YORK, United States — As global economic woes continue to wear on consumer spending, some fashion and luxury companies are teetering on the brink. Blue chip brands are halting expansion plans in order to focus on survival tactics, while smaller labels with limited resources are faced with the reality of sudden annihilation. It may not seem to be the ideal time to start a new label, but New York-based womenswear designer Karolina Zmarlak remains unfazed. “All ventures in the business of fashion are daunting because it is an industry that is constantly moving, contradictory, and revenuechallenged,” she argues. “But it would be tragic to not face the demons and complexities by attempting to ‘wait it out.’” Rather than sitting on the sidelines, Zmarlak has jumped into the fashion game with an eponymous Autumn/Winter 2009 collection of directional and versatile clothes that bravely tackles womens’ shifting perception of real fashion value. Faced with tight personal credit, consumers want more bang for their hardto-part-with bucks. “We have taken this deeply to heart by enabling each piece to be worn in various, truly distinct ways,” notes Zmarlak’s business partner, Jesse Keyes, adding: “Just as the Parisian woman is famously able to style the same garment in a myriad of ways with accessories, our pieces can be accessorized within their own structure.” Zmarlak’s current offering consists of well thought out and superbly executed designs that give a whole new meaning to value shopping. There are two-toned, silk Georgette tops with contrast- ing hues that can transform into a short, architectural dress, a Samurai-like wrap blouse and even a bulbous, Lanvin-like top. Trousers are made with active wear material to structurally resemble leggings, but are cut high for a slimming effect around the waist. Zmarlak’s gowns also offer the same transformational value, and thanks to their innovative execution, are designed to fit any size. And the versatility doesn’t end there: almost all of the pieces can be worn inside out and are infused with enough Lycra that you can literally throw them into your luggage without worrying about wrinkles. “We hope [the clothes] will be seen as investment pieces for the woman’s closet,” Zmarlak says. “Our design is not trend-driven, but rather can be considered to hold to certain classic basics, while being forward in their expression, fabrication and quality.” The line is aesthetically well considered, but Zmarlak ups the irresistibility factor further with an accommodating and functional price point too. “We wanted to offer a price range that would be realistic for the modern woman. Though we are in the high-end, ready-to-wear category, we offer foundation pieces that fall within the $200-$400 retail range. While a woman may only buy one $1400 dress or a $2,000 coat—which become her investment pieces—she can under- gird and layer her entire wardrobe with our design-driven foundations,” insists Keyes. When asked how she feels about starting a line amidst the economic maelstrom, Zmarlak reamains undaunted: “Now is the time to show strength, build identity and be confident that we will find our customer and vice versa.” With conviction like that, who’s to argue against it? Takashimaya certainly didn’t. The influential Japanese department store just bought the rookie womenswear line. Robert Cordero is a Contributing Editor of The Business of Fashion.
  10. 10. MODO PRESS KIT 2011 ! Posted: 12:58 AM, December 26, 2009 Last Updated: 8:04 AM, December 27, 2009 The dapper doorman Bringing old-school charm to the nightclub bouncer world By JUSTIN ROCKET SILVERMAN Burly thick-necked bouncers are a dime a dozen at most bars and nightclubs in the city. And then there’s Robert Harris. “I’ve found that if you put a smile on your face and maintain a calm voice, people are much more likely to respond with the same calm,” Harris says. “It’s when you raise your voice that things start to escalate. I was brought up to be respectful of everyone, so that’s how I do my job.” Meet the city’s most dapper doorman. A 70-year-old retired NYPD officer, Harris has become a fixture on West Ninth Street, where he watches over the entrance to a bar and restaurant called Hotel Griffou. Wearing his signature driver’s cap and black trench coat, the doorman embodies the kind of sophistication that belonged to a more genteel era of nightlife. Think ’50s supper club instead of 21st century mega-club. It’s the kind of grace that leads Harris to remove his thick winter glove before shaking someone’s hand, anyone’s hand — and this guy shakes a lot of hands. The neighbors, especially the dog-walking regulars, have come to adore him. Harris can make small talk with passersby, and the dogs seem to love him as much as their owners. “Bob has become a valuable extension of our front-of-the-house atmosphere,” says co-owner Jesse Keyes. “Now the regulars say hello to him more than they say hello to me.” This stretch of Ninth Street off Fifth Avenue is an unlikely spot for a place as hip as Griffou. Keyes, also a partner at La Esquina and Goldbar, is very aware of the impression a doorman leaves on the neighbors, many of whom remember the infamous after-hours club Marylou’s that used to be at the same address. Hotel Griffou, named after a boarding house there long before Marylou’s, is far less debaucherous, yet the liquor is just as potent. The dapper doorman spends much of his night asking a crowd of what Keyes calls the “understated affluent” to keep their voices down outside. He rarely has to ask more than once. “When you have a big bouncer who is too bulky, it creates trouble,” says Griffou regular Laura Coulthard, 25. “Bob is a gentleman, and that’s what a classy bar like this is all about.” Bouncer work has been good for the dapper doorman, as well. Since he started this summer, Harris says he has lost 9 pounds and seen his cholesterol plummet. He attributes it to being on his feet five hours a day. But having a parade of gorgeous young women kissing you on the cheek every night certainly doesn’t hurt, either. jsilverman@nypost.com!
  11. 11. MODO PRESS KIT 2011
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
  13. 13. MODO PRESS KIT 2011 S'()!-!)A-.&+6)!T%TUU!)VC!:'!)A/#-2%!/6*!18!',#!4-<()!O-*)-)!3&'8!3+9A-*8%!?,+!-/#!'+!',#!+/&I&*-$!4-<()! O-*)-)!3&'8!9+/#!+/!$#))!?,-'!',#!5+,*!W-/7-'+)!)'+/#!6A)'-&/)!&)!'+!',#!+/&I&*-$!3GQGC!H,-'!)-&2%!&'()!1##*!-! I++2!)A+'!:+/!),+?)!)+!:-/%!?,#*!',#8(7#!1##*!K&*2!#*+6I,!'+!$#'!6)!)'+A!18C!L&*2!&'!/&I,'!,#/#R! ! !
  14. 14. MODO PRESS KIT 2011 Venue Review: Hotel Griffou Information Spectacular cocktails at new Village restaurant By Danyelle Freeman NY Daily News The cocktails at Hotel Griffou are phenomenal. There's one called the Trophy Wife. I wanted to dislike it based on its name alone, but it's excellent - a vibrant mix of cachaca, Champagne and passionfruit puree. My favorite is the Tarbell, a soothing combination of cucumber vodka, elderflower liqueur, cucumber and mulled red grapes. It's the kind of drink that's a little too easy to drink - as is the Mexican Rose, made with tequila, strawberries, lime and a fragrant dose of cilantro. The Griffou isn't a hotel. It's a restaurant that recently opened on a quiet Greenwich Village block lined with brownstones. It's named after a famous 1870s boardinghouse that once occupied the same space. Writers like Mark Twain and Edgar Allan Poe used to eat there. Now, people like Jennifer Lopez and Madonna do. There's no sign out front, just a blue awning with the number 21 on it. The owners are a pedigreed bunch - they've worked everywhere from La Esquina to Waverly Inn - well-versed in the art of speakeasy-style spots. There's an elegant, wood barroom up-front, followed by a series of charming dining nooks. You can request dinner in the salon, the library, the palm terrace, the wine vault or the studio. The powder blue salon feels like a -ladies-who- lunch room, and the palm terrace feels tropical. Or you can eat in the library, which is festooned with a blizzard of knickknacks like stuffed birds, books, musical instruments and teeny TVs playing oddball cartoons. The only room I didn't like was the studio with its siren red walls, wood benches, uncomfortable metal chairs and mismatched art. Most of the artwork was donated by friends of the owners, who are paid back in dinners and cocktails. The menu is filled with French-inspired American classics, like sole meunière, duck à l'orange and baked Alaska. The chef, Jason Giordano, reworks traditional dishes, turning lobster thermidor into a rich fondue with four kinds of cheese, caramelized onions, shallots and heavy cream. I also liked the duck à l'orange, finely cooked and served over baby beets, oranges and a golden beet and orange puree. It's a shame the rest of the menu isn't very good. I ordered steak tartare. What I got were dainty brioche rounds topped with a meek steak tartare and a cold, quail egg. Either I have a bigger appetite than most of their guests or the portions are way too tiny. How can the kitchen consider three shrimp an "appetizer" - and what if I'm sharing? Am I supposed to play rock, paper, scissors for the third shrimp? Usually, half the fun of ordering steak Diane is the show - a beef tenderloin doused in brandy and flamed tableside. None of that here, just a tough, sliced tenderloin in a mustard veal jus alongside butter-drenched potatoes. As for the market greens, I'd be embarrassed to serve it at a backyard barbecue, never mind a hip restaurant. It was a miserable salad with chalky goat cheese and fried shallots. And don't get the sole meunière. (It tasted curiously like soap on two separate occasions.) The desserts are good. There's a velvety butterscotch banana pudding with vanilla wafers and a teacup of bread croissant pudding. Perhaps they should rebrand Hotel Griffou as a cocktail bar with good desserts.
  15. 15. MODO PRESS KIT 2011 examiner.com NEWARK February 17, 11:39 AM ! Howard Portnoy - NY Restaurant Examiner New York restaurant review: Ghost of restaurants past and present at Hotel Griffou As might be expected of a city of its advancing years, New York has its share of restaurants with "a past." At some, like Fraunces Tavern, history was made. At others, like Delmonico's, eating history was made. Hotel Griffou has the rare distinction of belonging to both categories. Back in the late the nineteenth century, the restaurant was a writers' hangout. Mark Twain dined here and so did William Dean Howell (Twain's eventual biographer), who referred to the Griffou in two of his novels. Shortly after the turn of the twentieth century, a murder-suicide on the premises earned the establishment some unwanted press. Then it closed. Then it reopened for a season as Marylou's. Photo: Howard Portnoy Then it closed again. Which brings us more or less current. Last June, the space and name were reclaimed by local restaurant veterans Larry Poston, Johnny Swet, and Jesse Keyes. To give the restaurant a contemporary feel, they added an obligatory cocktail menu. And in a nod to the history of the space, they named one of the cocktails the "Tarbell," for muckraking journalist Ida Tarbell, who was a resident in the boardinghouse to which the restaurant was attached (the hotel in Hotel Griffou). The past, as they say, is prologue. The many rooms that make up this subterranean retreat have been infused with a cosmetized patina of age, occasioned partly by period furniture, shaded sconces, and old portraits in gilded frames. Some of the rooms, such as the Library (its actual name), are straight out of the game Clue. The menu, which fittingly has one foot in the past and one in the present, was recently revamped, and some of the early curiosities—duck confit poutine, chocolate baked Alaska—were deep-sixed. Happily, the lobster thermidor fondue was retained, though as Linda Richman of SNL Coffee Talk fame might observe, the dish is neither lobster thermidor not a fondue; discuss. The item as realized is a savory blend of cheeses (Gruyère, Fontina, and cream cheese) and lobster meat, though efforts to dip up the quite solid mass with the house-provided croutons will prove futile. There is no law against using a fork. Among the new items under the heading "Seasonal" you will find a lone, large raviolo of duck confit and goat cheese in a blood orange gastrique. In addition to the above-named ingredients, the saucer-size pasta package conceals a tempered egg, which pleasantly oozes yolk when you cut into it. An unheralded garnish of beets add a surprise dimension to the dish. An expertly cooked fillet of salmon is glazed with Banyuls wine and sandwiched between crunchy baby carrots and French lentils. But if you're going to visit once, the dish to have is the veal chop, a huge pan-roasted knob of the butteriest meat, flecked with a sweetbread foam and buried in oyster mushrooms and roasted fingerling potatoes. Even after inquiring, I'm at loss to explain the descriptor "blanquette de veau" style appended to the dish, but don't let that stop you from ordering what may be the city's best veal chop. Any restaurant worth its salt nowadays includes at least one salted sweet on its dessert menu. At Hotel Griffou, the requirement is met by salted caramel banana pudding pie—which by the way is fabulous. Remarkably, the flavor of ricotta cheese carries the main melody in the Nutella ricotta cheesecake, which is the only way a true ricotta cheesecake fanatic would have it. The item is crowned by a hazelnut encased in crystalized sugar; a nifty grace note. Despite mixed reviews in the months after it opened, Griffou was doing a brisk business on a recent weeknight, this in spite of snow earlier that day, which had made a mess of the streets. I suppose there is some truth to the axiom: Rebuild it and they will come. Hotel Griffou, 21 W. 9th Street, bet Fifth and Sixth Aves, 212-358-0228. Open seven days for dinner. Price range: $8 to $19 for first courses, $14 to $38 for main courses, $7 to $10 for desserts. Major credit cards are accepted.
  16. 16. MODO PRESS KIT 2011 ! ! New York Home > Nightlife > X Factor Photo Credit: Jamie Chung Published August 23, 2010 X Factor A Plush New Lounge on Kenmare The fall of Rome was quite a party. Wine flowed like water, indulgent feasts lasted all day, and there’s a reason it’s still called the Roman orgy. Well, it’s only been 1,500 years, but we have a feeling Rome is finally ready to fall again... Introducing XIX, a new lounge deep underneath Nolita Italian date spot Travertine, now open for select guests. Like all the best dens of iniquity, the numerically named XIX is completely hidden from passersby. Yet once you suss out the unmarked door and descend the steep staircase, you’ll be surrounded by a dim, candlelit, plush little chamber decked with lipstick-red leather couches ringing the room and a series of 1,000-pound slabs of etched marble hanging on the walls. Each slab tells part of the story of a young Roman warrior, scorned by his love, who plunges into combat to prove himself to her. (Not unlike the story of your senior prom.) Since no food is served here, you can’t actually have someone drop peeled grapes into your mouth (unless you supply the grapes and the grape-servant). So we’d advise focusing your attention instead on the wine, the DJ and finding the hidden room behind the red velvet curtain at the DJ booth, where young warriors can find other ways to prove themselves to their loves. We’d start with grapes. ! VITALS XIX 19 Kenmare St (below Travertine) New York, NY 10012 212-966-1810 !
  17. 17. MODO PRESS KIT 2011 Fashion & Style September 15, 2010 XIX, the Hot New Bar in NoLita By DENNY LEE CAN’T get in? Well, then, it must be hot. That must explain why XIX, a new subterranean bar in NoLIta, tracked down Disco, the infamous doorman from Bungalow 8, to work its door. It was a bloodbath the other Thursday. Strapping tennis players from the United States Open? Nope. Three guys from Brooklyn? Not a chance. Rejects from the Kenmare up the block? Rejected again. The scene downstairs was more serene. Turns out, the line about the private party is sometimes true. A reporter for Page Six, Tara Palmeri, was having a birthday party, though the only boldface name was Bode Miller, the skier, who was cavorting with two women, beer in hand. That didn’t stop the uninvited from trying to crash — and being rejected. Michael Nagle for The New York Times Michael Nagle for The New York Times THE PLACE Tucked under Travertine, an upscale Italian restaurant on gritty Kenmare Street. The door is unmarked, but just look for Disco, who’s hard to miss at 6-foot-7 and 300 pounds. The bar itself is dark and small — just a single 800-square-foot room with bordello-red banquettes, fake wood ceiling beams and marble slabs carved with Romanesque scenes of war and love-making. Think frat basement, redone by a metrosexual decorator. THE CROWD It’s still finding its groove, but on recent visits, the crowd was a mix of fashionable jocks in V-neck T-shirts and $300 jeans, and sassy women in Alexander Wang tops who didn’t mind buying their own drinks. But the space is small — capacity is 75 — so the vibe can change on a dime. GETTING IN When there is a private party, don’t bother. Otherwise, you’re at the mercy of Disco, who, depending on the night, can be the guy you curse out or your best friend. PLAYLIST There is a D.J. booth, featuring a roster of downtown names like Tommie Sunshine, who will be spinning Friday nights. DRINKS No cocktail menu at the moment, but there is the bottle service — Grey Goose for $400, anyone? Beers like an Amstel Light start at $11. XIX, 19 Kenmare Street (near Elizabeth Street); no phone. Open Wednesday through Sunday, 10 p.m. to 4 a.m. DENNY LEE!
  18. 18. MODO PRESS KIT 2011 ! Posted: 11:33 PM, February 12, 2010 Last Updated: 1:58 PM, February 18, 2010 Axl not sweet to fashionistas While only Fashion Week can persuade Guns N' Roses to play a secret show for 200 fans, it can't force frontman Axl Rose to turn up on time. The rock wildman was nearly three hours late for his show, leaving the well-heeled crowd -- including designer John Varvatos, p.r. icon Kelly Cutrone, One Model Management chief Scott Lipps and photographer Mick Rock -- waiting in a sweaty VIP area until just before 1 a.m. yesterday for the band to take the stage at the Varvatos store in the East Village. Once onstage, Rose -- who one guest said looked like Mickey Rourke in "The Wrestler" -- wouldn't stop and played until 3 a.m. The band continued the party at E__P, the music venue downstairs, until 5 a.m., when Axl shouted, "We're going to a club." As Axl staggered out, The Post's Brian Niemietz asked him how late he stays out at night and the sweat-drenched star snarled, "As long as it takes." KEVIN MAZUR ARCHIVE/WIREIMAGE.CO Axl Rose
  19. 19. MODO PRESS KIT 2011 AUGUST 31, 2009 TABLES FOR TWO Hotel Griffou 21 W. 9th St. (212-358-0228) by Nick Paumgarten The text message came in from an early arriver: “I’m here. Surrounded by girls.” Her dinner companion found her at the bar, amid several teeming parties of young women, their hair brushing her bare shoulders as they leaned in to order drinks. One’s first inclination was to credit the gimmicky cocktail menu, but a few rounds proved that these drinks were not girly; even the sweet-sounding ones were, in deference to an alleged old-timey disdain for sugar, very dry. The bartender, in a kind of lacy Rosa’s Cantina dress, explained that during Prohibition there wasn’t any mulled fruit. There was gin, however, and it went well with cava and a dash of lemon juice. Hotel Griffou appeared to be in the Daily Candy stage of early renown, a destination for new-restaurant scalp-collectors and spotters of personages whose names in print may tip between Roman and bold. Among the owners are guys who have opened other speakeasy-ish joints (such as Freemans and La Esquina) that have managed to feed people well while maintaining some cool. This restaurant, unmarked outside, occupies the garden level of an old Village town house that was once a nineteenth- century boardinghouse frequented by Mark Twain. More recently, the space belonged to Marylou’s, a neighborhood mainstay. Past the bar is a warren of dining rooms (the Library, the Studio, the Palm Terrace, and so on), each with its own category of bric-a-brac and contrived kitsch. In the Salon, a giant, droll color photograph of an older woman in a trenchcoat, shooting flames from her wrists, seemed to epitomize the place. The food at a restaurant like this must be good enough merely to stave off the fear that you may be the mark in a scam. As it stands, you wonder. The menu is heavy on French-infused comfort food, some of which, like the gloppy lobster-thermidor fondue or the plate of fried sweetbreads in a white onion sauce (reminiscent of a Philly cheesesteak, which just seemed wrong), could benefit from the restraint evident in the cocktails. Still, Hotel Griffou has been open just two months, so it deserves some slack. Simpler stuff—such as the bacon-Gruyère burger—bears up better. The pork paillard, pounded thin and seasoned with chives, shallots, and veal jus, comes from a recipe set down by Madame Marie Griffou in 1892. Allegedly. (Open daily for dinner. Entrées $17-$40.) ! PHOTOGRAPH: ELIZA HONEY
  20. 20. MODO PRESS KIT 2011 ! ! Thu, Jun 18, 2009 Your Hotel Griffou Cheat Sheet This hotly-anticipated restaurant with stellar downtown pedigree opens for public walk-ins tonight. Here’s what you need to know. Plus: Slideshow! By ELIZABETH BOUGEROL Kimba/Flickr Creative Commons 2.0 Hotel Griffou, the hotly-anticipated restaurant with a stellar downtown pedigree, opens for public walk-ins tonight. Here’s what you need to know: ¥ What do we mean by “pedigree,” ‘zactly? The owner triumvirate is as follows: one used to manage Pastis and the Waverly Inn (Larry Poston), one was a founder of La Esquina (Jesse keyes), and one presided over Freemans and parts of the Keith “Minetta Lane” McNally and Sean “Jane Hotel” MacPherson empires (Johnny Swet). ¥ The resto is named, sez Grub Street, after “the 1870s boardinghouse where (per Appetite City, by William Grimes) you could score a multi-course feast, complete with a pint of wine, for 50 cents.” ¥ Rooms like the salon and library are all fine – with décor just kooky enough to be genuinely European – but if you can, score a spot in the be-chandeliered wine vault, which seats 14. ¥ The menu (from Spice Market’s Jason Michael Giordano) has decidedly old-school touchpoints: duck a l’orange, sole meuniere, pork cutlets “from an 1892 recipe.” The prices are new-school: Entrees will run you $17, for the burger, to $42, for the lobster tails with brown butter veloute. ¥ House-menu cocktails are $14; refreshingly, there’s not a sidecar or a sazerac in sight. Best-named cocktail is The Trophy Wife: Matusalem rum, passion fruit, key lime juice, sugarcane syrup, nutmeg. Hotel Griffou, 21 West 9 Street near Fifth Avenue; (646) 448-4632 Grub Street has even more details and a Griffou slideshow. Copyright NBC Local Media, First Published: Jun 17, 2009 2:21 PM EDT !
  21. 21. MODO PRESS KIT 2011 ! 6/17/09 First Look at Hotel Griffou, Opening for Public Previews Tonight Photo: Adrian Wilson One of the restaurants mentioned in William Grimes’s Appetite City will make a comeback of sorts when Hotel Griffou opens for preview walk-ins tonight. The Griffou is named after the 1870s boardinghouse where (per Grimes) you could score a multi-course feast, complete with a pint of wine, for 50 cents. As you can see below, the throwback menu (designed by Jason Michael Giordano, a former chef de cuisine at Spice Market and Mia Dona) isn’t quite as generously priced, but you may forgive that when you take a look at our slideshow. Owners Larry Poston (a former manager of Pastis and the Waverly Inn), Johnny Swet (former manager at Freemans as well as at Sean MacPherson’s and Keith McNally’s restaurants), and Jesse Keyes (a founding partner of La Esquina and GoldBar) have done quite a number on the “library room,” the “salon,” and the “studio” (each have about 30 seats, and two of the rooms have working fireplaces) as well as the fifteen-seat terrace and a fourteen-seat wine vault. Reservations will be open to all starting July 1 (the official “soft opening”), but given the owners’ pedigree, we won’t be surprised when that means “we have a 6:30 and an 11 p.m.” (dinner will be served from 6 p.m. till midnight and the bar will stay open till 1 a.m.). Are you going to want to get in on this place early and often? We’re thinking yes, you are. Hotel Griffou, 21 W. 9th St., nr. Fifth Ave.; 212-358-0228 By: Daniel Maurer!
  22. 22. MODO PRESS KIT 2011 Dining & Wine Published: September 23, 2009 RESTAURANT REVIEW | HOTEL GRIFFOU Stargazing, With a Bit of Nostalgia By PETE WELLS Christopher Smith for The New York Times THROWBACK Hotel Griffou, in a former boardinghouse on West Ninth Street, has four dining rooms decorated in different styles. WHEN the operators of restaurants known as celebrity hangouts are asked how an ordinary civilian can get V.I.P. treatment, they invariably give the same answer: Make yourself a regular. I used to believe them before Hotel Griffou, a new restaurant on West Ninth Street, came along. Its owners — among them veterans of the Waverly Inn, Freemans and La Esquina — have the frequent pleasure of reading gossip items about the meals enjoyed there by Kanye West, Jennifer Lopez, Sean Penn and the like, but Hotel Griffou seemed to follow the principle in reverse. I was treated worse each time I showed up. After my first dinner, I sat by the bar to wait for my friends to catch up. An employee rushed over and asked, in a voice that floated like a paper airplane, “Can I buy you a drink while you’re waiting for your table?” I wish she had been around for my final meal there, when I checked in on time for an 8 p.m. reservation. “Three people?” asked the man at the desk. No, four, I said. He replied, with evident sorrow, that he had me down for three. “I called a couple of hours ago to change it to four,” I said.
  23. 23. MODO PRESS KIT 2011 “Our reservations line closes at 5,” he said, as if he’d caught me. Why did it matter? At every restaurant I’ve seen, a three top is a four top missing a chair. Not at Hotel Griffou, where we were sent to the bar while someone hunted down our table. The restaurant has four dining rooms, and we had an excellent view of one, a bright space with long beer-hall tables that sat empty. We imagined that they were being held for a group. Naturally, this is where we were seated, 50 minutes after we had arrived. I was afraid that if I returned they would hit the one-hour mark and lead me to a produce crate by the dishwasher. So I stayed away. That’s too bad in some regards, because Hotel Griffou does have its allures. Each dining room has a different motif, as if the restaurant were trying to ignite a collect-them-all frenzy. A friend described the Library as “very man- cavey,” outfitted with wooden ducks, a manual typewriter, a fiddle, a saddle, shelves filled with law books, a football that looks as if it was in play when F. Scott Fitzgerald was at Princeton, and four fox pelts. The Salon, dominated by a large photograph of an old woman shooting flames from her wrists, looks like the drawing room of an English aristocrat with a weakness for odd contemporary art. The most sedate chamber is coyly known as the Palm Terrace. It sports a potted palm along with ivory leather banquettes and wallpaper celebrating the glory days of the Raj. A Little Red Riding Hood installation distinguished the last room I ate in, but I was too addled to give it a full exegesis. Apart from the modern art, the overall aesthetic drinks deep of the current nostalgia for country houses and hunting lodges in the sunset years of the British empire, mixed in with the renaissance of the types of handmade cocktails that faded during Prohibition. There’s a letter-perfect mint julep and a navy grog with pineapple juice and rum that almost makes you want to join a ship. Of everything Hotel Griffou offers, the drinks are the easiest things to swallow. They helped buff the rough edges of the food that followed. The cooking is hard to classify, partly because the menu is divided into “Seasonal” and “The Classics.” In the first category are garden-variety takes on Mediterranean-derived dishes. Grilled trout with tomatoes and braised fennel was typical, and successful. Much stranger was a chicken breast “in pistou,” as the menu claimed. In actuality, the delicate basil sauce coated a handful of crisp vegetables rather than the powdery, overcooked chicken, which could have used it. Tender fettuccine appears with a rotating cast of seasonal vegetables. One night it was a very enjoyable pairing of kale and cranberry beans, on another, fresh chickpeas with eggplant, so underdone it squeaked. As modern as these dishes were, their presentations were often scattershot, as if the food had been lobbed in the general direction of plates as they sailed toward the kitchen door. The classics were more solid. On this side of the menu you’ll find a dish not served anywhere else in the city, a plate of pounded and fried pork cutlets under a dark mushroom sauce with peas. It is an appealingly unreconstructed throwback, dating to 1892 and attributed to Marie Griffou, who once ran a boardinghouse at this address. The tender and rich burger was a solid success, and the secret seemed to be the way the kitchen let a mildly tart and spicy ketchup soak into the top bun. It shouldn’t have made a difference, but it did. A strip sirloin steak was cooked just as we had asked, and hit the right beefy notes, though the sauce au poivre seemed to be geared to diners who don’t like black pepper. But you’d think that our waiter might have delivered a $37 steak, or for that matter a $17 burger, without having to be reminded who got what. Service at Hotel Griffou can be wildly inconsistent. In the Library, we were under the ministrations of a flotilla of servers. (Given the country-estate mood, and how briskly and unobtrusively they patrolled the room, I am tempted to call them servants.) On another night, we got the kind of gruff attention you expect at a steakhouse. After that last meal, having abandoned the gooey desserts that had the excessive sweetness that is the hallmark of school bake sales, we saw a vehicle parked at the curb, a Mercedes Sprinter cargo van that had been expensively retrofitted for passengers. A driver had ferried somebody from out of town for dinner at Hotel Griffou. With luck, that somebody did not have to wait for a table. I’d hate to think of the driver’s overtime. Hotel Griffou SATISFACTORY 21 West Ninth Street, (212) 358-0228. ATMOSPHERE Four intimate dining rooms have contrasting decorating schemes but share an aesthetic that is prewar and vaguely Anglophilic. SOUND LEVEL Ranges from civilized (in the room called the Palm Terrace) to raucous. RECOMMENDED DISHES Deviled crab croquettes, spinach salad, grilled Tasmanian sea trout, fettuccine, burger, strip sirloin frites, plat au boeuf. WINE LIST French-leaning, with just enough choices under $50. An ideal night here would begin with a cocktail, and could stop right there. PRICE RANGE Appetizers, $8 to $16; main courses, $19 to $38. HOURS Monday to Saturday, 6 to 11:45 p.m.; Sunday, 6 to 11 p.m. RESERVATIONS Recommended several days to a week ahead. CREDIT CARDS All major cards. WHEELCHAIR ACCESS Not accessible. WHAT THE STARS MEAN Ratings range from zero to four stars and reflect the reviewer’s reaction to food, ambience and service, with price taken into consideration. Menu listings and prices are subject to change.
  24. 24. MODO PRESS KIT 2011 July 7, 2009 by Jean Nathan Griffou’s Wilde Past: West Village Restaurant’s Ghost Guests Included Oscar, Twain, Tarbell Shot by Adrian Wilson. Faux classic is the New York restaurant flavor du jour, but partners in the new Hotel Griffou at 21 West Ninth Street hit authenticity pay dirt with a history-buff neighbor’s fortuitous tip. Johnny Swet (former general manager of Bowery Bar, Balthazar, Pastis and Freeman’s); Larry Poston Jr. (formerly front-of-the-house manager at Town, Pastis and the Waverly Inn); Jonathan Hettinger (who had run a private-equity fund before managing Cafeteria in South Beach, Fla.); and Jesse Keyes (founding partner of La Esquina and Goldbar) were having trouble coming up with a name for their 3,600-square-foot venture between Fifth and Sixth avenues, the basement of three linked, landmarked, 19th-century Anglo-Italianate brownstones. “Ocean’s 21” read the name on the broken-down awning—a Rat Pack–themed ’50s-style speakeasy that had been closed for four years. Before that it was the infamous Marylou’s, where Jack Nicholson and Robert De Niro were regulars and the drugs flowed as freely as the booze; before that, a steakhouse called Nat Simon’s Penguin. None of these inspired. Then, after a meeting with the buildings’ co-op board in late January, Robyn Malin-Rubinstein, the board’s treasurer, asked whether the partners knew that the space had encompassed the Hotel and Restaurant Griffou in the late 1800s. She told them the buildings were built in 1851 as a boardinghouse that Marie Griffou and her second husband took over in the early 1870s. In its heyday, muckraker Ida Tarbell had lived at the hotel and frequented the restaurant, a writers’ hangout. It was referred to in at least three novels by two Gilded Age customers (Thomas A. Janvier’s At the Casa Napoleon, and William Dean Howell’s The World of Chance and A Hazard of New Fortunes). Someone, Ms. Malin-Rubinstein added, had kept a brown bear tied up in the backyard before the authorities required its removal to the Central Park Zoo. The partners went into a research frenzy. They found that Mark Twain dined at the Griffou. Oscar Wilde did, too, during his 1882 American tour. The baby bear was apparently purchased by Louis Napoleon Griffou, Madame Griffou’s son, who, it was said, feared the temptation to buy something foolish with his earnings. Madame Griffou died in 1905, and her establishment made its last headlines a year later, when a 60-year-old married banker killed his 28-year-old lover and then himself in one of the hotel’s rooms. (Ms. Malin-Rubenstein, who has lived for the past decade in a spacious modern duplex on the third and fourth floors where she and her husband,Jason, the co-op president, run Product Lounge, a home design licensing firm, was a bit taken aback to discover that the very room in which the murder-suicide took place is one of the eight that make up her apartment.) Sometime between that incident and 1907, the Hotel Griffou closed. By 1909, it had reopened as the Hotel Europe, according to the New York Times obituary for Xavier Hernandez, the Griffou’s maitre d’ for 35 years, who died that year in his room upstairs. In 1929, a new owner’s plan to demolish the buildings and rebuild was averted by the stock market crash. (No one has yet been able to fill in what went on in the three decades between the Depression and the 1960s, when it became the Penguin.) The new Griffou is open now, in an age more tarnished than gilded, with a vodka-elderflower cocktail named the Tarbell on its retro-inflected menu. As celebrities like Chloë Sevigny, Rachel Roy, Harvey Weinstein, John Leguizamo and Ross Bleckner filter in, the partners are still finding the past a calming obsession. “It’s like ready-made soul,” said Mr. Swet, who is trying to establish historical proof that Edna St. Vincent Millay, his poet idol who once lived on the block, was a regular at the old Griffou. He’s still looking.!
  25. 25. MODO PRESS KIT 2011 ! ! Monday, June 29th 2009, 11:49 AM ! The Closer: This week's real estate news and gossip Hotel Griffou located at 21 W. Ninth Street in Manhattan (Wilson) There is life after football for ex-New York Jets wide receiver Keyshawn Johnson. The native Californian has taken up interior design as something that counts as more than a hobby. Whether he’s any good or not, we’re not sure, but A&E television network thinks he’s interesting enough for his own design-themed reality show. “Keyshawn Johnson: Tackling Design” premieres Saturday, July 11, at noon. The show follows the talented USC graduate and NFL analyst who grew up in South Central’s Crenshaw as he designs homes for clients. After getting a glimpse of Johnson’s own home on “MTV Cribs” years back, we were impressed by a minimalist touch. We’ll see what he can do with a camera over his shoulder instead of a cornerback. One thing’s for sure, the guy loves publicity. We hear Johnson gets tough in the first episode when he calls on a husband to be firm with his wife over color choice. What major-league movie star has reportedly given up Gramercy Park digs for the far West Village? The family is renting there and may be looking to buy a nearby townhouse. Lady Gaga is also looking in the West Village. Her two-car entourage was spotted on Charles St. with a real estate agent. After turning a SoHo loft space into a residential event extravaganza, the folks at Thrillist.com must be a little tired. Over five nights, Thrillist partnered with Absolut vodka and different nationally known locally- based Web sites (the Onion, flavorpill, Cool Hunting) to bring over 1,500 guests through the Safe Harbor Loft off Grand St. Hula-Hoop dancers, graffiti artists, deejays and world-class bartenders who taught guests how to mix drinks. While the space changed decor nightly, certain design elements remained. Thermosensitive pillows by NunoErin and authentic race chairs from Jaguar and Ferrari (inset) were interior highlights in the loft- turned-home party space. For more information, check out www.thrillist.com. Barbara Bush, John McCain’s daughter Meghan and actor John Leguizamo have a new neighbor on lower Fifth Ave. Bar/restaurant Hotel Griffou just opened at 21 W. Ninth St. in the legendary space once known as Mary Lou’s. Through the 1990s, Mary Lou’s drew stars such as Jack Nicholson, author Jay McInerney and some very colorful made men. Griffou, named after a woman who ran a rooming house on the same site in the early 1900s, gives the place new life. Owned and designed by Johnny Swet (Balthazar, Freemans), Larry Poston (Waverly Inn) and Jesse Keyes (Gold Bar, La Esquina), Hotel Griffou promises to be the newest place for the “A-list” crowd. Focusing on food and decor, the owners have spiced up this relatively midsize space by dressing up each room differently. The Studio is a pink blush room made to resemble a working artists area. The color gives it a Lily Pulitzer-on-acid feel. The Library has fox skins, 1920s leather footballs, silver chalices, folk art and law texts from the Mary Lou bookshelves. “The idea here was to take elements from this place’s great past, twist them, engage them and then fragment them again,” says Keyes, the real estate developer in the group. What’s he mean? Frilled wallpaper breaks away and disintegrates into solid wall. Art will not have accompanying cards giving the artist’s name. The multi-room sound system was installed by residential apartment specialist Bryan Bilgore who has done apartments in the Carlyle Hotel and many new condominiums. Hotel Griffou officially opens July 1. While the kitchen closes at 11:45pm, the lively bar stays open till 1am, a far cry from Mary Lou's after-hours scene. As for Leguizamo, locals tell us the Colombia-born actor needs to pick up after his dog. !
  26. 26. MODO PRESS KIT 2011
  27. 27. MODO PRESS KIT 2011 10. IAC Building by Frank Gehry 8. East Harlem School by Peter Gluck and Partners 4. Scandinavia House by Ennead Architects 2. Pier 62 Carousel Shed by CR Studio Architects 1. HL23 by Neil M. Denari Architects [Photos by Paul Clemence] 7. 1 7th Avenue South by Rogers Marvel Architects 6. Greenwich Village Residence by SPG Architects 5. 23 Beekman by Della Valle Bernheimer 4. Scandinavia House by Ennead Architects 9. Diana Center by Weiss/Manfredi
  28. 28. PRESS MODO PRESS KIT 2011 ! Local News Daffy's contest offers luxury apartment Wednesday, July 22, 2009 http://abclocal.go.com/wabc/video?id=6927868 Eyewitness News NEW YORK (WABC) -- How would you like to live in a luxury apartment in the village for just hundreds of dollars a month? A new contest is giving you the chance. And all you have to do is make your case. The contest is being held by discount clothing store Daffy's, which is moving from the rack to the real estate in a contest that's all about finding a bargain in a recession. While its sleek finishes and interesting architecture are the selling points of the West Village apartment, developer Jesse Keyes has taken the condo off the market because of the recession. Instead, he is renting it out for $7,000 a month. But you can rent it for just $700. Daffy's is holding a contest, and if you win, you get the apartment for a steal. Daffy's has been selling discount clothing for 48 years. And at a time when people are looking for discounts, Daffy's is waging a big push. The president, Marcia Wilson, loved the idea of extending her company's discounts to the world of real estate, at least for the duration of this ad campaign. Here's how it works. You go into a Daffy's store, sit down in front of one of a camera and and tell Daffy's why you deserve the expensive apartment for a reduced price. Daffy's will select their five favorite entries and the public will chose a winner. Daffy's is also opening a pop-up store on the first floor of the building where the apartment is located. So for Daffy's, it's an extra way to market the brand and the contest. For the developer, it helps put his building on the map, and that could translate into a sale down the road. The contest begins Thursday, and you can head into a Daffy's store in the tri-state area to participate. Visit Daffys.com and click on "The Apartment" for more information, but not until the contest begins. --- WEB PRODUCED BY: Bill King (Copyright ©2010 WABC-TV/DT. All Rights Reserved.)!!

Views

Total views

534

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

4

Actions

Downloads

4

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

0

×