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Data Management and Healthcare: Why Databases and EMRs Don't Make the Cut on Their Own

Healthcare organizations preparing for the value-based payment model shift have found their internal resources pushed to the limit. Often, in an attempt to address regulatory timetables, systems will use point solutions rather than move toward a long-term strategy of developing robust clinical analytics. If an organization is using their EHR for analytics, they will soon discover that these built-in analytics packages cannot help them identify opportunities for cost effectiveness and clinical best practices. Sophisticated data management and healthcare analytics solutions, however, can provide leaders with the integrated clinical, financial, and patient satisfaction data they need to transform their systems into data-driven enterprises.

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Data Management and Healthcare: Why Databases and EMRs Don't Make the Cut on Their Own

  1. 1. © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Proprietary. Feel free to share but we would appreciate a Health Catalyst citation. © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.comProprietary. Feel free to share but we would appreciate a Health Catalyst citation. Data Management and Healthcare: Why Databases and EMRs Don’t Make the Cut on Their Own By Dr. David Burton.
  2. 2. © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Proprietary. Feel free to share but we would appreciate a Health Catalyst citation. The Myth of Stand-alone EHR Facing the most sweeping payment transformation in history, healthcare systems are struggling to figure out how the shift to a value-based model will impact their operations and bottom line. They know an EHR by itself isn’t going to be enough to make the transition to the new model of care delivery and are now looking to additional data management and healthcare analytics solutions.
  3. 3. © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Proprietary. Feel free to share but we would appreciate a Health Catalyst citation. The Myth of Stand-alone EHR Simultaneously, they must also address complementary but competing priorities, such as: • Emerging shared-risk payment models such as Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs), patient-centered medical homes, and bundled payments • The deployment or upgrade of an EHR to capture documentation data electronically and qualify for Meaningful Use incentives • New reimbursement carrots and sticks tied to quality and efficiency outcomes • Transitioning to a patient-centered care model • A shortage of qualified health information technology professionals • Overall industry consolidation
  4. 4. © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Proprietary. Feel free to share but we would appreciate a Health Catalyst citation. The Myth of Stand-alone EHR This has strained internal resources and left many health systems working to stay ahead of regulatory timetables. Unfortunately, this management- by-crisis approach has led to a focus on tactical point solutions designed to address immediate needs at the expense of an integrated, strategic plan to address both immediate and long-term needs.
  5. 5. © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Proprietary. Feel free to share but we would appreciate a Health Catalyst citation. The Myth of Stand-alone EHR Analytics packages offered by their EHR vendor and their existing business intelligence/analytics tools are not up to the task of supporting the transformation currently underway. New technologies, such as adaptive, late-binding data warehouses, are providing new data management and healthcare analytics solutions that can identify opportunities to improve clinical effectiveness, cost effectiveness, and safety.
  6. 6. © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Proprietary. Feel free to share but we would appreciate a Health Catalyst citation. Benefits of Data Management Health Catalyst deploys a unique Late-Binding™ Data Warehouse that enables healthcare organizations to automate extraction, aggregation, and integration of clinical, financial, costing, administrative, patient experience, and other relevant data and apply advanced analytics to organize and measure clinical, patient safety, cost and patient satisfaction processes and outcomes. Data Acquisition and Storage Source Mart Designer IDEA Source Marts: EMR, Patient, Billing, Costing, General Ledger, Patient satisfaction Source Marts: Clinic EMR, Professional, Billing, Time Card, HR, AR, Supply Chain, Claims Source Marts: Additional Source Marts as necessary Catalyst Analytics Platform Atlas EDW Console Security and Auditing Meta-Data Engine Advanced Analytics Data Marts Content Repositories SAM Designer Late BindingTM Data Warehouse
  7. 7. © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Proprietary. Feel free to share but we would appreciate a Health Catalyst citation. Benefits of Data Management Without an agile, adaptable data warehouse, health systems and their clinicians are unable to integrate clinical data with financial, standard costing, and patient satisfaction data located in disparate transactional systems, each of which often has its own unique system for identifying patients and providers.
  8. 8. © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Proprietary. Feel free to share but we would appreciate a Health Catalyst citation. Benefits of Data Management An adaptive data warehouse enables organizations to become data-driven enterprises capable of analyzing data to identify opportunities for improvement. This can be done by department, by procedure, by disease or condition, by service line, by physician, or any other category for which data is captured electronically.
  9. 9. © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Proprietary. Feel free to share but we would appreciate a Health Catalyst citation. Benefits of Data Management The Healthcare Analytics Adoption Model describes a wide variety of increasingly sophisticated and useful types of analytic capabilities that each organization can produce over time, but only with the caveat of first starting with the foundational element of the EDW.
  10. 10. © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Proprietary. Feel free to share but we would appreciate a Health Catalyst citation. Healthcare: Efficiency & Effectiveness To succeed in the future, hospitals must demonstrate quantitatively that they operate more effectively, more efficiently, and more safely. Hospitals must identify and reduce waste in three categories: • Waste due to variation in the care that is ordered • Waste due to variation in how efficiently that care is delivered • Waste due to variation in care delivery that cause preventable complications
  11. 11. © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Proprietary. Feel free to share but we would appreciate a Health Catalyst citation. Healthcare: Efficiency & Effectiveness According to a 2012 report from the Institute of Medicine, approximately 30 percent of U.S. healthcare spending in 2009 was wasteful, including unnecessary services, medical errors, poor care coordination, excessive administrative costs, fraud, and other problems.
  12. 12. © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Proprietary. Feel free to share but we would appreciate a Health Catalyst citation. Healthcare: Efficiency & Effectiveness Now that public and private payers are reducing payments or refusing to pay for poor- quality care, including care that is defective or unsafe, waste is becoming a financial drain on bottom lines. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) recently withheld a percentage of Medicare payments to almost 1,500 hospitals because of high rates of patients readmitted within 30 days of being treated.
  13. 13. © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Proprietary. Feel free to share but we would appreciate a Health Catalyst citation. Healthcare: Efficiency & Effectiveness CMS expanded the list of preventable hospital-acquired conditions it won’t pay for from nine to eleven. Those hospital-acquired conditions include, for example, pressure ulcers; injuries caused by falls; central-line and urinary catheter-associated infections; and surgical infections resulting from artery bypass grafts, bariatric surgery for obesity, and certain orthopedic procedures.
  14. 14. © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Proprietary. Feel free to share but we would appreciate a Health Catalyst citation. Healthcare: Efficiency & Effectiveness Clearly, the new CMS reimburse- ment policies and other industry quality measures linked to payment are pressuring hospital bottom lines more than ever. This is where data management and an advanced healthcare- specific analytics platform can support process improvements to reduce errors and unnecessary use of high-cost services.
  15. 15. © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Proprietary. Feel free to share but we would appreciate a Health Catalyst citation. Healthcare: Efficiency & Effectiveness Data management and healthcare analytics solutions uncover waste tied to excessive diagnostics and procedures ordered to minimize exposure to malpractice. Mining data for information can ensure more effective and safer patient care at a lower cost using clinical analytics not available from an EHR alone — precisely the role of data management and healthcare analytics.
  16. 16. © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Proprietary. Feel free to share but we would appreciate a Health Catalyst citation. More about this topic Late-Binding Data Warehouse: The Fastest Growing Trend in Healthcare Analytics (a free, on-demand webinar, transcript, and slides) Dale Sanders, Senior Vice President New Report Covers Major Shift From EMRs to Data Management and Healthcare Analytics Gartner Building a Data Warehousing and Analytics Strategy (a free, on-demand webinar, transcript, and slides) Eric Just, Vice President of Technology, and Mike Doyle, Vice President Health Information Technology: Why Point Solutions Strike Out Ken Trowbridge, Vice President The Late-Binding Data Warehouse Explained (white paper) Dale Sanders, Senior Vice President, Strategy
  17. 17. © 2014 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Proprietary. Feel free to share but we would appreciate a Health Catalyst citation. For more information:
  18. 18. © 2013 Health Catalyst www.healthcatalyst.com Other Clinical Quality Improvement Resources Click to read additional information at www.healthcatalyst.com Dr. David A Burton is former Executive Chairman and CEO of Health Catalyst, and currently serves as a Senior Vice President, future product strategy. As a senior leader of the Health Catalyst team, Dr. Burton has been instrumental in helping define and design all elements of the Health Catalyst strategy, including our future product roadmaps, our advanced deployment and operational processes engaging executives and clinicians in data-driven improvement methodologies, and our content strategy for integrating best practice and evidence-based guidelines into our product categories. Previously, Dr. Burton was as a Senior Vice President of Intermountain Healthcare, where he served in a variety of executive positions for 23 years and co-developed Intermountain's Clinical Integration strategy, including advocacy of the EDW, which supported it. Dr. Burton is the former founding Executive Vice President of Intermountain's managed care plans (now known as SelectHealth), which currently provide insurance coverage to approximately 600,000 members. He holds an MD from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and did his residency training at Massachusetts General Hospital in internal medicine. He was a charter member of the American College of Emergency Physicians and was Board Certified in Emergency Medicine. He practiced emergency medicine and was president of a single-specialty group of 20 emergency care physicians before joining the executive team at Intermountain. He holds an MD from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and did his residency training at Massachusetts General Hospital in internal medicine. He was a charter member of the American College of Emergency Physicians and was Board Certified in Emergency Medicine. He practiced emergency medicine and was president of a single-specialty group of 20 emergency care physicians before joining the executive team at Intermountain.

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