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“ It is simplicity that is difficult to make.” - Bertholdt Brecht
 
Player Factors and Reality <ul><li>Memory </li></ul><ul><li>Problem Solving </li></ul><ul><li>Attention Span </li></ul><ul...
Some Bad Assumptions <ul><li>The player is “different” </li></ul><ul><li>Players don’t know what games are </li></ul><ul><...
Some Good Assumptions <ul><li>The player is “normal”, with some factors very magnified </li></ul><ul><li>The player knows ...
User Input Realities <ul><li>Some people use single switch input </li></ul><ul><li>Some can use the mouse or maybe a touch...
Game Output Realities <ul><li>No reading </li></ul><ul><li>No complex or sequential tasks </li></ul><ul><li>Consistency in...
Learning is Games is Learning <ul><li>You can learn a lot about games by looking at learning (and vice versa) </li></ul><u...
 
Design with Extreme Purpose <ul><li>You don’t need to come up with new design rules </li></ul><ul><li>Take what you know t...
Enable Player Mastery <ul><li>Mastery of the user interaction methods </li></ul><ul><li>Mastery of the user interface </li...
Approaches to Mastery <ul><li>Learning from failure doesn’t work – consider a zero-failure approach </li></ul><ul><li>Repe...
Patience is Golden <ul><li>The player won’t master the game overnight </li></ul><ul><li>Allow for lots and lots of repetit...
In a Nutshell <ul><li>Take all you know and can learn about games, UI, user interaction and human nature </li></ul><ul><li...
 
Some Game Challenges <ul><li>Create cooperative experiences for all players of all abilities </li></ul><ul><li>Come up wit...
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Game accessibilty in special education

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These are the slides for my talk at the Games for Health Game Accessibility Day conference. There are notes attached to the original by the way, so hopefully you can view those for reference.

Updated May 28 with better notes.

Game accessibilty in special education

  1. 1. “ It is simplicity that is difficult to make.” - Bertholdt Brecht
  2. 3. Player Factors and Reality <ul><li>Memory </li></ul><ul><li>Problem Solving </li></ul><ul><li>Attention Span </li></ul><ul><li>Reading, linguistics and verbal comprehension </li></ul><ul><li>Math comprehension </li></ul><ul><li>Visual comprehension </li></ul><ul><li>Physical disability </li></ul>
  3. 4. Some Bad Assumptions <ul><li>The player is “different” </li></ul><ul><li>Players don’t know what games are </li></ul><ul><li>“It’s a 3 year old in the body of a teenager” </li></ul><ul><li>You need to come up with new design rules </li></ul>
  4. 5. Some Good Assumptions <ul><li>The player is “normal”, with some factors very magnified </li></ul><ul><li>The player knows what games are </li></ul><ul><li>The player knows their age, so treat them with respect and dignity </li></ul><ul><li>Common sense design rules are fine </li></ul>
  5. 6. User Input Realities <ul><li>Some people use single switch input </li></ul><ul><li>Some can use the mouse or maybe a touch screen </li></ul><ul><li>Some have no fine motor skills </li></ul><ul><li>“Twitch” games are out because timing is an issue </li></ul>
  6. 7. Game Output Realities <ul><li>No reading </li></ul><ul><li>No complex or sequential tasks </li></ul><ul><li>Consistency in all things </li></ul><ul><li>Highlight important things, mute the unimportant </li></ul>
  7. 8. Learning is Games is Learning <ul><li>You can learn a lot about games by looking at learning (and vice versa) </li></ul><ul><li>Mastery, assessment, engagement, and lots of other concepts are shared </li></ul><ul><li>Read up on Universal Design for Learning (UDL) </li></ul>
  8. 10. Design with Extreme Purpose <ul><li>You don’t need to come up with new design rules </li></ul><ul><li>Take what you know to work to extremes </li></ul><ul><li>Really do what you know to be true </li></ul><ul><li>There is no fallback </li></ul>
  9. 11. Enable Player Mastery <ul><li>Mastery of the user interaction methods </li></ul><ul><li>Mastery of the user interface </li></ul><ul><li>Mastery of the game </li></ul><ul><li>Mastery of frustration </li></ul>
  10. 12. Approaches to Mastery <ul><li>Learning from failure doesn’t work – consider a zero-failure approach </li></ul><ul><li>Repeat, repeat, repeat and then repeat again </li></ul><ul><li>Teach UI mastery first, game second </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes mastering the UI is the game itself </li></ul>
  11. 13. Patience is Golden <ul><li>The player won’t master the game overnight </li></ul><ul><li>Allow for lots and lots of repetition for gaining mastery </li></ul><ul><li>Watch for emergent gameplay </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t be frustrated by the student </li></ul>
  12. 14. In a Nutshell <ul><li>Take all you know and can learn about games, UI, user interaction and human nature </li></ul><ul><li>Magnify it by many orders of magnitude </li></ul><ul><li>Aim to enable mastery </li></ul><ul><li>Work from the standpoint of patience </li></ul>
  13. 16. Some Game Challenges <ul><li>Create cooperative experiences for all players of all abilities </li></ul><ul><li>Come up with affordable controllers </li></ul><ul><li>Stop making dumb games </li></ul><ul><li>Start making good games </li></ul>
  • dfain

    Jun. 12, 2010

These are the slides for my talk at the Games for Health Game Accessibility Day conference. There are notes attached to the original by the way, so hopefully you can view those for reference. Updated May 28 with better notes.

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