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Bread faults and remidies by indianchefrecipe @ www.indianchefrecipe.com

faults and remedies in bread making and there evaluation of quality of breads.

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Bread faults and remidies by indianchefrecipe @ www.indianchefrecipe.com

  1. 1. BREAD FAULTS AND EVALUATION OF QUALITY OF BREADS
  2. 2. Understanding of Bread faults NO OVEN SPRING   SOLUTION: a. Check recipe b. Decrease dough temperature c. Reduce resting time d. Increase mixing time BLISTERS AND HOLES ON CRUST   a. Check recipe b. Increase resting time c. Mould correctly d. Check proofer humidity e. Reduce oven steam SOLUTION:
  3. 3. EXCESSIVE COLOUR   a.Check recipe b.Increase dough temperature c. Increase resting time d.Reduce baking temperature COARSE CRUMB STRUCTURE   a.Reduce water level b.Increase dough temperature c. Increase mixing time d.Increase resting time e.Reduce proof time and temperature SOLUTION: SOLUTION:
  4. 4. RAPID STALING   a.Check recipe b.Increase water level c. Reduce resting time d.Increase baking temperature e.Reduce baking time LACK OF COLOUR   a.Check recipe b.Decrease dough temperature c. Reduce resting time d.Increase proofer steam e.Increase baking temperature SOLUTION: SOLUTION:
  5. 5. COLLAPSED ROLLS OR FANCY BREADS                  a. b. c. POOR VOLUME   a.Check recipe b.Increase water level c. Increase mixing time d.Increase resting time e.Check proofing time f. Reduce baking time Check recipe Increase mixing time Reduce proof time and temperature SOLUTION: SOLUTION:
  6. 6. Bread faults in bread loaf FLYING TOPS a.Rest dough for longer period b.Extend final proof time c. Decrease initial baking temperature d.Use steam while baking COLLAPSED BREAD   a.Check flour quality b.Check recipe c. Reduce water level d.Increase mixing time e.Ensure correct final proof SOLUTION: SOLUTION:
  7. 7. NO OVEN SPRING   a.Check recipe b.Decrease dough temperature c. Reduce resting time d.Increase baking temperature e.Check steam pressure TOO MUCH VOLUME SOLUTION:   a.Check recipe b.Reduce mixing time c. Check dough temperature d.Check scaling weight e.Reduce final proof time SOLUTION:
  8. 8. LACK OF VOLUME   a.Check flour quality b.Check recipe c. Increase mixing time d.Extend final proof time e.Reduce baking temperature BADLY SHAPED BREAD   a.Increase water level b.Check moulder settings c. Mould dough evenly d.Check dough placement on pan e.Use steam when baking SOLUTION: SOLUTION:
  9. 9. WRINKLED CRUST   a.Check recipe b.Extend resting time c. Reduce final proof time d.Cool bread before wrapping e.Ensure packed at correct temperature HOLES UNDER TOP CRUST   a.Check recipe b.Reduce mixing time c. Reduce resting time d.Reduce final proof time e.Reduce oven top heat SOLUTION: SOLUTION:
  10. 10. UNEVEN TEXTURE   a.Check water level b.Increase resting time c. Mould dough evenly d.Check proof height RAPID STALING   a.Check recipe b.Increase water level c. Reduce resting time d.Increase baking temperature e . .Reduce baking time SOLUTION: SOLUTION:
  11. 11. BLISTERS ON CRUST   a.Check recipe b.Increase dough temperature c. Extend resting time d.Check proofer steam setting e.Reduce final proof time MOULD AND ROPE   a.Ensure hygiene and cleanliness b.Check recipe preservative level c. Check baking time d.Ensure sliced and packed at correct temperature e.Ensure correct storage environment SOLUTION: SOLUTION:
  12. 12. SIDES COLLAPSING   a.Check recipe b.Reduce mixing time c. Extend baking time d.Remove from pans after baking BREAD STICKS IN PAN   a.Reduce water level b.Check pan oil application c. Check proofer steam setting d.Reduce final proof time e.Extend baking time SOLUTION: SOLUTION:
  13. 13. Controlling of temperature during baking the breads Dough Temperature : 28 - 31˚C Proofer Relative Humidity : 85% Proofing Time : 50 - 60 Min Oven Temperature : 220 - 230˚C Baking Time : 25 - 35 Min GENERAL BAKING INFORMATION:
  14. 14. Under baking is a common fault. Most lean hearth breads are best baked in a hot oven preheated to 425˚ F to 450˚F (218 ˚C to 232˚C ) until the crust takes on a rich , deep brown colour. Use the lower end of this range for large loaves and the hotter temperatures for small products. Small products need a higher temperature so the crust browns sufficiently in the shorter baking time. A well browned crust has a richer flavour because of the well caramelized starchy and the brown proteins. Pale golden crust has a blander flavour. In addition, taking care to bake the bread fully ensures a crisp crust that is less likely to be soften by excessive moisture from the interior of the bread .
  15. 15. Steam should be used for at least the first 15minutes of baking. Injecting moisture into the oven delays the formation of the crust so the bread can expand fully. Thus the crust will be thin and crisp rather than thick and hard. The moisture also affects the starches on the surface of the bread, aiding in creating a more attractively browned crust.
  16. 16. Kneading It's difficult to over-knead dough by hand, but it's actually very easy to do with a machine, so check it fairly often. Kneading one loaf's worth of white-bread dough by hand should take about 10 minutes. Kneading two loaves' worth takes almost double the time. It takes longer for whole-wheat flour as well. (An all-whole-wheat loaf would take twice as long to knead, but you'll seldom make an all- whole-wheat loaf.)  Kneading does three crucial things for bread: it distributes the yeast and other ingredients evenly and thoroughly, it develops the gluten in the dough, and it introduces air. The gluten, or wheat protein, is what enables the dough to stretch instead of collapsing when the yeast grows inside it. If the gluten isn't developed, the dough won't rise well and will produce a heavy loaf - rather like a brick.
  17. 17. • Some bread recipes call for a second kneading just before the dough is added to the loaf pans. Professional bakers call this benching and shaping the dough. • Step 1 Start with dough that has been measured and mixed properly. • Step 2 Turn the dough out on a clean, floured work surface. • Step 3 Flour your hands well.
  18. 18. Step 4 Use the heel of your hands to compress and push the dough away from you, then fold it back over itself. Step 5 Give the dough a little turn and repeat Step 4. Put the weight of your body into the motion and get into a rhythm. Step 6 Keep folding over and compressing the dough until it becomes smooth and slightly shiny, almost satiny. Check your recipe for specifics. The most common test for doneness is to press it with your finger. If the indentation remains, it's ready for rising. You can also try stretching part of the dough into a rectangle. If it can stretch into a thin sheet without breaking, you've kneaded it enough.
  19. 19. Purposes of mixing of dough • The first two purposes of mixing— • combining the ingredients into a dough • and distributing the yeast—are accomplished during the first part of this step. • The remaining time is necessary to develop the gluten.
  20. 20. Under mixing of dough • Under mixed dough's have poor volume and texture . • Rich dough's are generally under mixed slightly because a greater tenderness is desired for these products. Rye breads are also mixed less because of their weaker gluten, which tears easily.
  21. 21. Over mixing of dough • Over mixing is a common error in bread making. • Gluten that is developed too long has stretched nearly as far as it can and loses its elasticity. Then it tears instead of stretches, and molding is more difficult. The texture and volume of over mixed products are less desirable. • Salt, used in proper quantities, helps alleviate this problem because it makes gluten stronger and more elastic.
  22. 22. THANK YOU

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