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BestExperienceBrands2013A Global Study by Jack Morton Worldwide
/2Best Experience Brands 201330-Second SummaryExperience has become a familiar businessbuzzword, widely used if casually u...
The experience gap / 4									About the study / 5									Key insights from the research / 6							5 best experience prin...
/4Best Experience Brands 2013The experience gapJosh McCallI’m not here to declare, sky-is-falling style, thatexperience is...
About the studyBest Experience Brands is based on a surveysponsored by Jack Morton Worldwide andconducted by DB5 in late 2...
/6Best Experience Brands 2013Key insights from the researchLiz BighamThese findings are consistent with earlierresearch—ou...
/7Best Experience Brands 2013Some groups, however, are markedly moreinfluenced than others (fig. 3-4). These includepeople...
/8Best Experience Brands 2013Men are slightly more likely than womentohave higher consideration, and significantlymore lik...
/9Best Experience Brands 20135 best experience principles4. Create community.Beyond fueling recommendations and referrals,...
/10Best Experience Brands 2013Stories of experience brandsFollowing are direct quotesfrom some of the 4,000participants in...
/11Best Experience Brands 2013Honesty andtransparencyare valued1“[The] benefits of the product are exaggeratedduring purch...
/12Best Experience Brands 2013“One dealer in particular inquired more aboutmy personal needs to help look for what Ireally...
/13Best Experience Brands 2013“Above andbeyond”experiences areremembered(so are theiropposites)“I was kept fully informed ...
/14Best Experience Brands 2013Experience drivers and opportunitiesFocusing on the shopping experience and thecustomer expe...
/15Best Experience Brands 2013Fig.5Brand experience drivers by sectorShopping Experience: Stated DriversCustomer Experienc...
/16Best Experience Brands 2013reveals that brands still have the opportunity todo better—a lot better. Judging by one fact...
/17Best Experience Brands 2013Fig.7Experience drivers: expectations vs. performanceAutomotiveShopping ExperienceRank RankD...
/18Best Experience Brands 2013Fig.7Experience drivers: expectations vs. performanceRetailShopping ExperienceRank RankDrive...
/19Best Experience Brands 2013Fig.7Experience drivers: expectations vs. performanceInsuranceShopping ExperienceRank RankDr...
3 steps to better brand experienceIt’s clear: brands need to raise their game when itcomes to brand experience. Across geo...
/21The C-Suite ProjectContact: Liz Bigham, SVP, Director of Brand MarketingE: liz_bigham@jackmorton.comT: +1 212 401 7212R...
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/16Best Experience Brands 2013reveals that Brand experience guidelines and best practices

/16Best Experience Brands 2013reveals that brands still have the opportunity todo better—a lot better. Judging by one factor, thedegree to which people perceive their experiencesto be unique, brands are not breaking through.Median uniqueness for the specific brandssurveyed by category (fig. 6) is as lowas 29% (in the insurance sector). Even inthe sector where brands score the highestlevels of uniqueness—retail—about half ofthe time brands aren’t differentiated fromtheir competitors. In every instance, brands’experiences are perceived to be slightly moreunique during shopping versus after purchase,suggesting an opportunity for brands to standout with customers by truly focusing on howthey’re engaged even after they buy, whetherthrough special incentives, regular added-valueengagement or timely information.Judging by how people rank brands’ performanceagainst key experience drivers (fig. 7), the gapbetween expectations and actual performanceremains a significant challenge. In a limitednumber of instances, people agree that brandsactually meet core requirements—for example,consumers are relatively satisfied that most carThe most important driver of experience can besummed up in a single word: people.Across sectors, the experience drivers thatconsumers say matter are most often connected tostaff and service—both as they are shopping andafter they become customers of a brand. People-related drivers are the highest ranked categoryof driver in every sector and at every stageof shopping and customer experience, with asingle exception: during the automotive shoppingexperience, people place a huge value on factorsconnected to trying out the product.The clear emphasis on people as experiencedrivers also comes through in participant verbatims.When we asked for open-ended stories of greatexperiences, people and service were cited 37%of the time, unprompted, more than any otherfactor. People are also behind bad experiences:42% of all industries and over half (51%) of theunprompted stories consumers told us about badretail experiences stemmed from poor service.The biggest opportunity for brands is stilldifferentiating based on experience.As in earlier studies, Best Experience Brandsbrands do a good job of providing opportunitiesto test drive and informative staff interactions indealerships. Yet in most other instances, acrossall geographies, sectors and demographics,more often than not consumers still rate brands’performance as falling short of expectations.Fig.6How differentiated are brand experiences?CarsCarsRetailRetailInsuranceInsuranceUnique Shopping ExperienceAverageAverageMedianMedianUnique Customer Experience29%29%33%34%40%46%43%51%39%39%46%48%

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