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Literate environment analysis

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Literate environment presentation

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Literate environment analysis

  1. 1. LITERATE ENVIRONMENT ANALYSIS BY JEANEAN MCGEE WALDEN UNIVERSITY EDUC 6706
  2. 2. • Understanding how students learn, and particularly how they learn to read and write, influences the instructional approaches that teachers use (Tompkins, 2010). • Students gain valuable experiences in an environment where they are exposed to high quality literature.
  3. 3. GETTING TO KNOW LITERACY LEARNERS, P- 3 • IT IS IMPERATIVE FOR TEACHERS TO KNOW THEIR STUDENTS AS LITERACY LEARNERS. • TEACHERS MUST IDENTIFY WITH INDIVIDUAL'S AND MEET THEIR NEEDS. • TEACHERS WHO CAREFULLY ANALYZE THEIR STUDENTS ORAL READING, CHECK THEIR STUDENTS FLUENCY, ENCOURAGE THEIR STUDENTS TO RETELL WHAT THEY HAVE READ, AND ASK A SERIES OF COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS GATHER USEFUL ASSESSMENT INFORMATION THAT HELPS INVENTORY STUDENT READING BEHAVIOR AND ACHIEVEMENTS (AFFLERBACH, 2012).
  4. 4. SELECTING TEXT • Exposing children to a variety of informational text will stimulate development of background knowledge, vocabulary, and comprehension skills (Stephens, 2008). • Incorporating informational text in the curriculum in early years of school has the potential to increase student motivation, build important comprehension skills, and lay the groundwork for students to grow into confident, purposeful readers (Duke, 2004).
  5. 5. SELECTING TEXT • Before selecting text I determine the learning styles, interest and culture of the students. • Teachers should consider literacy levels of the students. • When readers know and do during reading has a tremendous impact on how they comprehend, but comprehension involves more than just readers factors (Tompkins, 2010).
  6. 6. Framework for Literacy Instruction Interactive perspective Learners Affective and cognitive aspects of literacy learning Texts Text structures, types, genres, and difficulty levels matched to literacy learners and literacy goals and objectives Instructional Practices Developmentally appropriate research- based practices used with appropriate texts to facilitate affective and cognitive aspects of literacy development in all learners Interactive Perspective Reading and writing accurately, fluently, and with comprehension Being strategic and metacognitive readers and writers Use a variety of informal and formal assessments to determine areas of strength and need in literacy development. Determine texts of the appropriate types and levels of difficulty to meet literacy goals and objectives for students. use instructional methods that address the cognitive and affective needs of students and the demands of the particular text. Promote students' independent use of reading strategies and skills.
  7. 7. INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE • The ultimate goal of the interactive perspective is to teach children how to be literate learners who can navigate the textual world independently (Laureate Education, n.d.). • I address students cognitive and metacognitive as they used the strategy of predicting. • Strategies represent the thinking that readers do as they read, whereas skills are quick, automatic behaviors that require any thought (Tompkins, 2010).
  8. 8. INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE LITERACY LESSON • CREATING A LESSON PLAN WITH THE INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE IN MIND IT IS IMPORTANT THAT THE LESSON IS WELL BALANCED. THE ULTIMATE GOAL OF THE INTERACTIVE PERSPECTIVE IS TO TEACH CHILDREN HOW TO BE LITERATE LEARNERS WHO CAN NAVIGATE THE TEXTUAL WORLD INDEPENDENTLY (LAUREATE EDUCATION, N.D.). • WHEN I CREATED THE LESSON ON TURTLES I FOCUSED ON THREE STUDENTS THAT I HAVE BEEN WORKING WITH FOR THE PAST FEW WEEKS. IN THIS LESSON I INTRODUCE THE CONCEPTS OF COMPREHENSION, WORD RECOGNITION, PERDITION AND FLUENCY. I USED FICTION, NONFICTION AND MEDIA SOURCES ABOUT TURTLES TO ENGAGE THEM. I ADDRESSED ASSESSMENT OPPORTUNITIES AS WELL AS ADAPTATIONS FOR STUDENTS.
  9. 9. Framework for Literacy Instruction Critical Perspective Learners Affective and cognitive aspects of literacy learning Texts Text structures, types, genres, and difficulty levels matched to literacy learners and literacy goals and objectives Instructional Practices Developmentally appropriate research-based practices used with appropriate texts to facilitate affective and cognitive aspects of literacy development in all learners Critical Perspective Judging, evaluating, and thinking critically about text Find out about ideas, issues, and problems that matter to students. Understand the learner as a unique individual. Select texts that provide opportunities for students to judge, evaluate, and think critically. Foster a critical stance by teaching students how to judge, evaluate, and think critically about texts. Response Perspective Reading, reacting, and responding to text in a variety of meaningful ways Find out about students' interests and identities. Understand what matters to students and who they are as individuals. Select texts that connect to students' identities and/or interests and that have the potential to evoke an emotional or personal response. Provide opportunities for students to read, react, and formulate a personal response to text.
  10. 10. CRITICAL & RESPONSE PERSPECTIVE THE CRITICAL AND RESPONSE PERSPECTIVES ENCOURAGE STUDENTS TO THINK DEEPER INTO THE BOOKS THEY ARE READING AND BEGIN TO EXPLORE HOW TEXTS AFFECTS THEIR LIVES (LAUREATE EDUCATION, N.D.).
  11. 11. CRITICAL & RESPONSE PERSPECTIVE LITERACY LESSON I DECIDED TO DO A LESSON ON THE STORY THE JOLLY POSTMAN. I FELT THIS IS A GREAT STORY TO INTEGRATE THE CRITICAL AND RESPONSE PERSPECTIVE STRATEGIES TO STUDENTS. STUDENTS COGNITIVE AND METACOGNITIVE WERE ADDRESSED AS THEY USED THE STRATEGY OF PREDICTING. DR. JANICE STATED THAT CHILDREN EXAMINE TEXT TEND TO THINK DEEPLY ABOUT IT (LAUREATE EDUCATION, N.D). I DECIDED CHOOSE A STORY THAT WOULD RELATE TO STUDENTS IN A MEANINGFUL WAY.
  12. 12. This lesson offered them an opportunity to make connections and be critical thinkers. Students examine the letters and talk about the differences of the mail and recorded the information on chart paper. At the conclusion of the story, we discuss why the author put the characters in the book. They express feelings about charters and genuine thoughts as why they felt a certain character was in the book. Critical & Response Perspective LITERACY LESSON
  13. 13. REFERENCES AFFLERBACH, P. (2012). UNDERSTANDING AND USING READING ASSESSMENT, K-12(2ND ED). NEWARK, DE: INTERNATIONAL READING ASSOCIATION DUKE, N.K. (2004). THE CASE FOR INFORMATIONAL TEXT. EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP, 61(6), 40-44 LAUREATE EDUCATION (PRODUCER). (N.D.). CRITICAL PERSPECTIVE. [VIDEO FILE]. RETRIEVED FROM HTTPS://CLASS.WALDENU.EDU LAUREATE EDUCATION (PRODUCER). (N.D.). RESPONSE PERSPECTIVE. [VIDEO FILE]. RETRIEVED FROM HTTPS://CLASS.WALDENU.EDU STEPHENS, K.E. (2008). A QUICK GUIDE TO SELECTING GREAT INFORMATIONAL BOOKS FOR YOUNG CHILDREN. RETRIEVED FROM HTTP://WWW.READINGROCKETS.ORG/ARTICLE/26050 TOMPKINS, G. (2010). LITERACY FOR THE 21ST CENTURY: A BALANCED APPROACH (5TH ED). BOSTON: ALLYN & BACON
  14. 14. "Once you learn to read, you will be forever free." — Frederick Douglass The End

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