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PROJECT REPORT ON
CSR ACTIVITIES UNDERTAKEN BY HERO
MOTOCORP
UNDER THE GUIDANCE OF PADMAJA TAMULI
SUBMITED BY: NAME – KOUS...
Page | 2
CONTENTS
Article I. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT___________________________ 3
Article II. COMPANY PROFILE_____________________...
Page | 3
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
I take this opportunity to express my profound gratitude and deep
regards to my guide Asst. Prof....
Page | 4
COMPANY PROFILE
Hero MotoCorp Ltd. (Formerly Hero Honda Motors Ltd.) is the world's largest manufacturer
of two -...
Page | 5
Milestone
During the 1980s, the company introduced motorcycles that were popular in India for their
fuel economy ...
Page | 6
 2011—New Models of Hero Honda motorcycles Glamour, Glamour FI, CBZ Xtreme,
Karizma launched. New licensing arra...
Page | 7
Strategy
Hero MotoCorp's key strategies are to build a robust product
portfolio across categories, explore growth...
Page | 8
THE CONCEPT AND EVOLUTION OF CSR
The evolution of corporate social responsibility in India refers to changes over...
Page | 9
The Four Phases of CSR Development in India
The history of CSR in India has its four phases which run parallel t...
Page | 10
reforms which sought to abolish untouchability, encourage empowerment of women and rural
development.
The Third ...
Page | 11
produce goods for the developed world need to pay a close attention to compliance with the
international standar...
Page | 12
in order to have an effective and lasting solution to the social works . Partnerships between
companies, NGOs an...
Page | 13
CSR POLICY OF THE ORGANISATION
Ride Safe India
Hamari Pari
CSR VISION - TO HAVE A GREENER, SAFER
AND EQUITABLE W...
Page | 14
Happy Earth
E2 – Educate to Empower
Aims at bringing change in our
environment for, literally, making our
world ...
Page | 15
CSR ACTIVITIES UNDERTAKEN UNDER THE
REALM OF CMPANIES ACT,2013
The Board of Directors (the "Board") of Hero Moto...
Page | 16
 Rain Water Harvesting
- Has implemented Rooftop Harvesting, Storm water Harvesting & Open area
Harvesting.
 T...
Page | 17
 Adult Literacy Mission
- Launched on 21st September, 1999, covering the nearby villages of Malpura, Kapriwas
A...
Page | 18
- “BE A HERO GOOD RIDER” focuses on Bike Education
- As part of CSR program Ride Safe India, Hero MotoCorp Ltd.
...
Page | 19
Page | 20
SECTOR WISE FUNDS INVESTED
 Paid up Capital - 39.94 crores
 Total Turnover - 24,166.49 crores
 Total Profit a...
Page | 21
POLICY SUGGESTIONS
1. Define messaging: Don’t strike blindly at different goals, such as preserving
rainforests ...
Page | 22
CONCLUSION
Govrnance will become the key to sustainability in business. At the end of the day, building a
large ...
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Hero Motocrop CSR project Report

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This is project report on Hero Motocorp CSR Activities

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Hero Motocrop CSR project Report

  1. 1. PROJECT REPORT ON CSR ACTIVITIES UNDERTAKEN BY HERO MOTOCORP UNDER THE GUIDANCE OF PADMAJA TAMULI SUBMITED BY: NAME – KOUSHIK KHAN SCHOLAR NO. – 15-50-111 DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES
  2. 2. Page | 2 CONTENTS Article I. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT___________________________ 3 Article II. COMPANY PROFILE______________________________ 4 1) HISTORY _________________________________________________________ 4 2) MILESTONE ______________________________________________________ 5 3) VISION ___________________________________________________________ 6 4) MISSION __________________________________________________________ 6 5) STRATEGY_______________________________________________________ 7 6) BAND ___________________________________________________________ 7 7) MANUFACTURING________________________________________________ 7 8) DISTRIBUTION____________________________________________________ 7 Article III. THE CONCEPT AND EVOLUTION OF CSR ___________ 8 1) ACTIVITIES_______________________________________________________ 8 2) THE FOUR PHASES OF CSR DEVELOPMENT IN INDIA_________________ 9 3) CURRENT STATE OF CSR IN INDIA__________________________________ 11 4) LAW______________________________________________________________ 12 Article IV. CSR POLICY OF THE ORGANISATION_______________ 13 Article V. CSR ACTIVITIES UNDERTAKEN BY THE ____________ 15 ORGANISATION Article VI. SECTOR-WISE FUND INVESTED____________________ 19 Article VII. POLICY SUGGESTIONS____________________________ 20 Article VIII. CONCLUSION____________________________________ 22 Article IX. REFERENCES_____________________________________ 22
  3. 3. Page | 3 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT I take this opportunity to express my profound gratitude and deep regards to my guide Asst. Prof. Miss. Padmaja Tamuli for her exemplary guidance, monitoring and constant encouragement throughout the course of this thesis. The blessing, help and guidance given by her time to time shall carry us a long way in the journey of life on which we are about to embark. I also take this opportunity to express a deep sense of gratitude to in-charge. I am obliged to our Head of the department Dr. Ashim Kumar Das (H.O.D. Management Studies) for giving this great opportunity. I am grateful for his cooperation during the period of my assignment. Lastly, I thank every one of our batch for their cooperation, support and for their constant encouragement without which this assignment would not be possible. Thanks & Regards KOUSHIK KHAN (SCHOLAR NO.- 15-50-111)
  4. 4. Page | 4 COMPANY PROFILE Hero MotoCorp Ltd. (Formerly Hero Honda Motors Ltd.) is the world's largest manufacturer of two - wheelers, based in India. In India, it has a market share of about 46% share in 2- wheeler category. The 2006 Forbes 200 Most Respected companies list has Hero Honda Motors ranked at #108.The company achieved the position of being the largest two-wheeler manufacturing company in India and also, the 'World No.1' two-wheeler company in terms of unit volume sales in a calendar year. Hero MotoCorp Ltd. continues to maintain this position till date. On 31 March 2013, the market capitalisation of the company was INR 308 billion (USD 5.66 billion). The Company is engaged in the manufacturing and selling of motorized two-wheelers, spare parts and related services. The Company offers a range of products, which include Karizma ZMR, Hunk, Xtreme Sports, Maestro, Pleasure, Glamour Programmed FI, Passion Pro TR, Splendor iSmart and Splendor Pro Classic. It has a range of products across bikes, including 100 cubic centimeter (cc), 125cc, 150cc and 225cc, and scooter categories. The Company's two wheelers are manufactured across four manufacturing facilities. Two of these are based at Gurgaon and Dharuhera, which are located in the state of Haryana in northern India. The third and fourth manufacturing plants are based at Haridwar, in the hill state of Uttrakhand. Its subsidiaries include HMCL (NA) Inc., HMC MM Auto Limited, HMCL Colombia S.A.S. and HMCL Netherlands B.V. In 2001. History Hero Honda started in 1984 at Dharuhera, India as a joint venture between Hero Cycles of India and Honda of Japan. Commerce family and Honda group both owned 26% stake in the Company. In 2010, when Honda decided to move out of the joint venture, Hero Group bought the shares held by Honda. Subsequently, in August 2011 the company was renamed Hero MotoCorp with a new corporate identity. In June 2012, Hero MotoCorp approved a proposal to merge the investment arm of its parent Hero Investment Pvt. Ltd. into the automaker. The decision comes after 18 months of its split from Honda Hero.
  5. 5. Page | 5 Milestone During the 1980s, the company introduced motorcycles that were popular in India for their fuel economy and low cost. A popular advertising campaign based on the slogan 'Fill it – Shut it – Forget it' that emphasised the motorcycle's fuel efficiency helped the company grow at a double-digit pace since inception. In 2001, the company became the largest two- wheeler manufacturing company in India and globally. It maintains global industry leadership till date. The technology in the bikes of Hero Motocorp (earlier Hero Honda) for almost 26 years (1984–2010) has come from the Japanese counterpart Honda.  1956—Formation of Hero Cycles in Ludhiana(majestic auto limited)  1975—Hero Cycles becomes largest bicycle manufacturer in India.  1983—Joint Collaboration Agreement with Honda Motor Co. Ltd. Japan signed Shareholders Agreement signed  1984—Hero Honda Motors Ltd. incorporated  1985—Hero Honda motorcycle CD 100 launched.  1989—Hero Honda motorcycle Sleek launched.  1991—Hero Honda motorcycle CD 100 SS launched.  1994—Hero Honda motorcycle Splendor launched.  1997—Hero Honda motorcycle Street launched.  1999—Hero Honda motorcycle CBZ launched.  2001—Hero Honda motorcycle Passion and Hero Honda Joy launched.  2002—Hero Honda motorcycle Dawn and Hero Honda motorcycle Ambition launched.  2003—Hero Honda motorcycle CD Dawn, Hero Honda motorcycle Splendor plus, Hero Honda motorcycle Passion Plus and Hero Honda motorcycle Karizma launched.  2004—Hero Honda motorcycle Ambition 135 and Hero Honda motorcycle CBZ Star launched.  2005—Hero Motocorp Super Splendor, Hero Honda motorcycle CD Deluxe, Hero Honda motorcycle Glamour, Hero Honda motorcycle Achiever and Hero Honda Scooter Pleasure.  2007—New Models of Hero Honda motorcycle Splendor NXG, New Models of Hero Honda motorcycle CD Deluxe, New Models of Hero Honda motorcycle Passion Plus and Hero Honda motorcycle Hunk launched.  2008—New Models of Hero Honda motorcycles Pleasure, CBZ Xtreme, Glamour, Glamour Fi and Hero Honda motorcycle Passion Pro launched.  2009—New Models of Hero Honda motorcycle Karizma: Karizma – ZMR and limited edition of Hero Honda motorcycle Hunk launched  2010—New Models of Hero Honda motorcycle Splendor Pro and New Hero Honda motorcycle Hunk and New Hero Honda Motorcycle Super Splendor launched.
  6. 6. Page | 6  2011—New Models of Hero Honda motorcycles Glamour, Glamour FI, CBZ Xtreme, Karizma launched. New licensing arrangement signed between Hero and Honda. In August Hero and Honda parted company, thus forming Hero MotoCorp and Honda moving out of the Hero Honda joint venture. In November, Hero launched its first ever Off Road Bike Named Hero "Impulse".  2012—New Models of Hero Motocorp Maestro the Musculine scooter and Ignitor the young generation bike are launched.  2013—Hero MotoCorp unveiled line-up of 15 updated products including Karizma R, ZMR, Xtreme, Pleasure, Splendor Pro, Splendor iSmart, HF Deluxe ECO, Hero Motocorp Super Splendor, Passion Pro and Xpro, Glamour and Glamour FI etc. It also introduced three new technologies- Engine Immobilizer in new Xtreme, Integrated Braking System (IBS) in new Pleasure and i3S (Idle Stop and Start System) in new Splendor iSmart  2014—Hero MotoCorp Launched Splendor Pro Classic, Xtreme Sports and new models of Karizma ZMR, Karizma R, Maestro and Pleasure.  2014—In October 2014, Hero updated its 100cc engine range on Passion Pro and Splendor Pro Classic. Is should be updated on other Hero's 100cc vehicles shortly as well.  2014—Hero invests $25 million into American motorcycle manufacturer EBR(Erik Buell Racing) Vision The story of Hero Honda began with a simple vision - the vision of a mobile and an empowered India, powered by its two wheelers. Hero MotoCorp Ltd., company's new identity, reflects its commitment towards providing world class mobility solutions with renewed focus on expanding company's footprint in the global arena. Mission Hero MotoCorp's mission is to become a global enterprise fulfilling its customers' needs and aspirations for mobility, setting benchmarks in technology, styling and quality so that it converts its customers into its brand advocates. The company will provide an engaging environment for its people to perform to their true potential. It will continue its focus on value creation and enduring relationships with its partners.
  7. 7. Page | 7 Strategy Hero MotoCorp's key strategies are to build a robust product portfolio across categories, explore growth opportunities globally, continuously improve its operational efficiency, aggressively expand its reach to customers, continue to invest in brand building activities and ensure customer and shareholder delight. Brand The new Hero is rising and is poised to shine on the global arena. Company's new identity "Hero MotoCorp Ltd." is truly reflective of its vision to strengthen focus on mobility and technology and creating global footprint. Building and promoting new brand identity will be central to all its initiatives, utilizing every opportunity and leveraging its strong presence across sports, entertainment and ground-level activation. Manufacturing Hero MotoCorp two wheelers are manufactured across 4 globally benchmarked manufacturing facilities. Two of these are based at Gurgaon and Dharuhera which are located in the state of Haryana in northern India. The third manufacturing plant is based at Haridwar, in the hill state of Uttrakhand; the latest addition is the state-of-the-art Hero Garden Factory in Neemrana, Rajasthan. Distribution The Company's growth in the two wheeler market in India is the result of an intrinsic ability to increase reach in new geographies and growth markets. Hero MotoCorp's extensive sales and service network now spans over to 6000 customer touch points. These comprise a mix of authorized dealerships, service & spare parts outlets, and dealer-appointed outlets across the country
  8. 8. Page | 8 THE CONCEPT AND EVOLUTION OF CSR The evolution of corporate social responsibility in India refers to changes over time in India of the cultural norms of corporations' engagement of corporate social responsibility (CSR), with CSR referring to way that businesses are managed to bring about an overall positive impact on the communities, cultures, societies and environments in which they operate. The fundamentals of CSR rest on the fact that not only public policy but even corporates should be responsible enough to address social issues. Thus companies should deal with the challenges and issues looked after to a certain extent by the states. Among other countries India has one of the oldest traditions of CSR but CSR practices are regularly not practiced or done only in namesake especially by MNCs with no cultural and emotional attachments to India. Much has been done in recent years to make Indian Entrepreneurs aware of social responsibility as an important segment of their business activity but CSR in India has yet to receive widespread recognition. If this goal has to be realised then the CSR approach of corporates has to be in line with their attitudes towards mainstream business- companies setting clear objectives, undertaking potential investments, measuring and reporting performance publicly.  Activities CSR activities to include: - eradicating extreme hunger and poverty - promotion of education - promoting gender equality and empowering women - reducing child mortality and improving maternal health - combating human immunodeficiency virus, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, malaria and other diseases - ensuring environmental sustainability - employment enhancing vocational skills - social business projects - contribution to the Prime Minister's National Relief Fund or any other fund set up by the Central Government or the State Governments for socio-economic development and relief and funds for the welfare of the Scheduled Castes, the Scheduled Tribes, other backward classes, minorities and women; and - such other matters as may be prescribed
  9. 9. Page | 9 The Four Phases of CSR Development in India The history of CSR in India has its four phases which run parallel to India's historical development and has resulted in different approaches towards CSR. However the phases are not static and the features of each phase may overlap other phases. The First Phase In the first phase charity and philanthropy were the main drivers of CSR. Culture, religion, family values and tradition and industrialization had an influential effect on CSR. In the pre- industrialization period, which lasted till 1850, wealthy merchants shared a part of their wealth with the wider society by way of setting up temples for a religious cause. Moreover, these merchants helped the society in getting over phases of famine and epidemics by providing food from their go downs and money and thus securing an integral position in the society. With the arrival of colonial rule in India from the 1850s onwards, the approach towards CSR changed. The industrial families of the 19th century such as Tata, Godrej, Bajaj, Modi, Birla, Singhania were strongly inclined towards economic as well as social considerations. However it has been observed that their efforts towards social as well as industrial development were not only driven by selfless and religious motives but also influenced by caste groups and political objectives. The Second Phase In the second phase, during the independence movement, there was increased stress on Indian Industrialists to demonstrate their dedication towards the progress of the society. This was when Mahatma Gandhi introduced the notion of "trusteeship", according to which the industry leaders had to manage their wealth so as to benefit the common man. "I desire to end capitalism almost, if not quite, as much as the most advanced socialist. But our methods differ. My theory of trusteeship is no make-shift, certainly no camouflage. I am confident that it will survive all other theories." This was Gandhi's words which highlights his argument towards his concept of "trusteeship". Gandhi's influence put pressure on various Industrialists to act towards building the nation and its socio-economic development. According to Gandhi, Indian companies were supposed to be the "temples of modern India". Under his influence businesses established trusts for schools and colleges and also helped in setting up training and scientific institutions. The operations of the trusts were largely in line with Gandhi's
  10. 10. Page | 10 reforms which sought to abolish untouchability, encourage empowerment of women and rural development. The Third Phase The third phase of CSR (1960–80) had its relation to the element of "mixed economy", emergence of Public Sector Undertakings (PSUs) and laws relating labour and environmental standards. During this period the private sector was forced to take a backseat.The public sector was seen as the prime mover of development.Because of the stringent legal rules and regulations surrounding the activities of the private sector, the period was described as an "era of command and control". The policy of industrial licensing, high taxes and restrictions on the private sector led to corporate malpractices. This led to enactment of legislation regarding corporate governance, labour and environmental issues. PSUs were set up by the state to ensure suitable distribution of resources (wealth, food etc.) to the needy. However the public sector was effective only to a certain limited extent. This led to shift of expectation from the public to the private sector and their active involvement in the socio-economic development of the country became absolutely necessary. In 1965 Indian academicians, politicians and businessmen set up a national workshop on CSR aimed at reconciliation. They emphasized upon transparency, social accountability and regular stakeholder dialogues. In spite of such attempts the CSR failed to catch steam. The Fourth Phase In the fourth phase (1980 until the present) Indian companies started abandoning their traditional engagement with CSR and integrated it into a sustainable business strategy. In the 1990s the first initiation towards globalization and economic liberalization were undertaken. Controls and licensing system were partly done away with which gave a boost to the economy the signs of which are very evident today. Increased growth momentum of the economy helped Indian companies grow rapidly and this made them more willing{Gajare, R.S. (2014). A conceptual study of CSR development in India. In D.B. Patil & D.D. Bhakkad, Redefining Management Practices and Marketing in Modern Age Dhule, India: Atharva Publications (p. 152-154).} and able to contribute towards social cause. Globalization has transformed India into an important destination in terms of production and manufacturing bases of TNCs are concerned. As Western markets are becoming more and more concerned about labour and environmental standards in the developing countries, Indian companies which export and
  11. 11. Page | 11 produce goods for the developed world need to pay a close attention to compliance with the international standards.  Current State of CSR in India As discussed above, CSR is not a new concept in India. Ever since their inception, corporates like the Tata Group, the Group, and Indian Oil Corporation, to name a few, have been involved in serving the community. Through donations and charity events, many other organizations have been doing their part for the society. The basic objective of CSR in these days is to maximize the company's overall impact on the society and stakeholders. CSR policies, practices and programs are being comprehensively integrated by an increasing number of companies throughout their business operations and processes. A growing number of corporates feel that CSR is not just another form of indirect expense but is important for protecting the goodwill and reputation, defending attacks and increasing business competitiveness. Companies have specialised CSR teams that formulate policies, strategies and goals for their CSR programs and set aside budgets to fund them. These programs are often determined by social philosophy which have clear objectives and are well defined and are aligned with the mainstream business. The programs are put into practice by the employees who are crucial to this process. CSR programs ranges from community development to development in education, environment and healthcare etc. For example, a more comprehensive method of development is adopted by some corporations such as Bharat Petroleum Corporation Limited, Maruti Suzuki India Limited. Provision of improved medical and sanitation facilities, building schools and houses, and empowering the villagers and in process making them more self-reliant by providingvocational training and a knowledge of business operations are the facilities that these corporations focus on. Many of the companies are helping other peoples by providing them good standard of living. Also, corporates increasingly join hands with non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and use their expertise in devising programs which address wider social problems. CSR has gone through many phases in India. The ability to make a significant difference in the society and improve the overall quality of life has clearly been proven by the corporates. Not one but all corporates should try and bring about a change in the current social situation in India
  12. 12. Page | 12 in order to have an effective and lasting solution to the social works . Partnerships between companies, NGOs and the government should be facilitated so that a combination of their skills such as expertise, strategic thinking, manpower and money to initiate extensive social change will put the socio-economic development of India on a fast track.  Law Under the Companies Act, 2013, any company having a net worth of rupees 500 crore or more or a turnover of rupees 1,000 crore or more or a net profit of rupees 5 crore or more should mandatorily spend at least 2% of last 3 years average net profits on CSR activities as specified in Schedule VII of the Companies Act, 2013 and as amended from time to time. The rules came into effect from 1 April 2014. SEBI, as per its notification on August 13, 2012, has mentioned that enterprises are accountable to the larger society and "adoption of responsible business practices in the interest of the social set-up and the environment are as vital as their financial and operational performance". SEBI has mandated the inclusion of Business Responsibility Reports as part of the annual reports of the Top 100 listed entities based on market capitalisation at BSE and NSE. These reports has to made available in the websites of the companies. For companies that do not belong to Top 100, inclusion of Business Responsibility Reports is not mandatory, though SEBI encourages its inclusion in the annual report and website.
  13. 13. Page | 13 CSR POLICY OF THE ORGANISATION Ride Safe India Hamari Pari CSR VISION - TO HAVE A GREENER, SAFER AND EQUITABLE WORLD Below are the 4 pillars of our CSR program: A 360 degree initiative on making Indian Roads safer to drastically reduce fatalities. We are setting up Road Safety Riding schools across India and plan to do campaigns on ground, on air, on social media, in schools to educate the masses & empower them to make a tangible difference. This initiative is supported by the Ministry of Road Transport & Highways, Government of India. An effort to specifically empower the women of tomorrow – a concentrated initiative targeted to the girl child from the age of 6+ from the underprivileged sections of society to help them in their holistic development and support them.
  14. 14. Page | 14 Happy Earth E2 – Educate to Empower Aims at bringing change in our environment for, literally, making our world a happy place to live in. We initiated 120,000 tree plantations in and around New Delhi, over 50 toilets in various schools and the possibilities are endless. Education is the basis of empowerment – not only for the individual but the society & economy at large. Our pledge for E2 is to support education, knowledge sharing & skill development at all levels.
  15. 15. Page | 15 CSR ACTIVITIES UNDERTAKEN UNDER THE REALM OF CMPANIES ACT,2013 The Board of Directors (the "Board") of Hero MotoCorp Limited (the "Company") has adopted the following policy and procedures with regard to Corporate Social Responsibility. The Board may review and amend this policy from time to time subject to the recommendations of Corporate Social Responsibility Committee.  GREEN TECHNOLOGY - Introduction of Acrylic Cathodic Electro deposition (ACED) painting process (water soluble paint) - Developed primer from waste paint sludge  SAFE MANUFACTURING - Has stopped using harmful chemicals such as Asbestos, Hexavalent Chromium, Phenolic  CONSERVING ENERGY AND GREEN IT – Heat recovery unit installed in the incinerator – Use of tfts in place of crts for displays – Reduction of printers, use of video conferencing – Replacing old inefficient equipment – Usage of e-learning to reduce trainee or trainer travel – Converting our paper based customer loyalty program to an online card based program – Using e-fund transfer, cutting down on printing of cheques – Digitization of workflows needing approvals, e-fax , email
  16. 16. Page | 16  Rain Water Harvesting - Has implemented Rooftop Harvesting, Storm water Harvesting & Open area Harvesting.  The Green Supply Chain - Has started “Green Vendor Development Program” for the front end and a “Green Dealer Development Program” for the back end of the supply chain where partners' are expected to manage their environment involving material resources, industrial wastes, energy resource, pollution  Stakeholder Ties at the Grassroots - Rural development centre has been set up on 40 acres of land along the delhi-jaipur highway - With wide approach roads, clean water and education facilities for both adults and children-now nurtures a vibrant, educated and healthy community  Raman Munjal Vidya Mandir - A modern senior secondary, CBSE affiliated co-educational school with over 1200 students and 61 teachers.  Raman Munjal Memorial Hospital - Multi-specialty hospital equipped with latest diagnostic and surgical technology, - Provides healthcare to the rural population in and around Dharuhera  Raman Munjal Sports Complex - Has basketball courts, volleyball courts, and hockey and football grounds, used by the local villagers
  17. 17. Page | 17  Adult Literacy Mission - Launched on 21st September, 1999, covering the nearby villages of Malpura, Kapriwas And Sidhrawali.  Marriages & Education Of Underprivileged Girls - Marriages are organized from time to time, - Particularly for girls from backward classes, providing financial help and other support to the families. - As part of E2 – Educate to Empower CSR initiative, Hero MotoCorp Ltd. launched a program called 'Career EduConnect' to Support 5000 Girls in Patiala district in Punjab by helping them with Career Counselling and providing guidance. The program was launched at B N Khalsa Senior Secondary School, Sirhind Road, Near Dukhniwaran Sahib Gurudwara, Patiala (Punjab) on October 24, 2015  Rural Health Care – Provides doorstep health care services to the local community, free health care and medical camps are now a regular feature in the hero group's community outreach program  Vocational Training Centre - 26 batches comprising of nearly 625 women have been trained in tailoring, embroidery and knitting. - Promotes self- employment in women. Safe Ride Program - Educating individuals in order to promote road safety - Conduct timely safe ride programs. - Developed a product information safety module
  18. 18. Page | 18 - “BE A HERO GOOD RIDER” focuses on Bike Education - As part of CSR program Ride Safe India, Hero MotoCorp Ltd. has associated with Haryana Police in Gurgaon for Student Police Cadet Project which aims at overall development of school students. Initially it is piloted in 6 schools in Gurgaon in which 264 students (each school 44 students, 50% boys & 50% girls) of class 8th have been selected to take part to begin with. The project will involve sessions on road safety awareness, traffic management, community development, leadership skills, disaster management, waste management etc. It will involve physical training along with outdoor activities.  “YES” AWARDS - The Honda Young Engineer and Scientist Award in India. - Stage I: The YES Award recognizes brilliant students who would drive future society towards an ecotechnological orientation. - Stage II: YES Award Plus Every YES Award recipient becomes eligible for the YES Award Plus, an additional award  ‘HAMARI ASHA’ - An educational program for village children who are first generation learners and attend govt. Schools - Objective is to provide these children with additional support to improve their educational standard and to achieve their overall development. - Started three years ago and currently, 10 centres are being managed across 8 villages, and more than 385 children have enrolled. - As part of CSR initiative Happy Earth, Hero MotoCorp Ltd. has started contributing towards Swachh Bharat Abhiyaan. On the eve of Gandhi Jayanti, 2nd October, 15 toilets and 3 urinals for boys were handed over to the following schools –  Govt. Middle School Shivaji Nagar, Gurgaon , Haryana  Govt. Sr. Sec. School for Girls Sidhrawali , Haryana  Govt. Sr. Sec. School for Girls Akera, Haryana
  19. 19. Page | 19
  20. 20. Page | 20 SECTOR WISE FUNDS INVESTED  Paid up Capital - 39.94 crores  Total Turnover - 24,166.49 crores  Total Profit after Taxes - 2,118.16 crores  Total Spending on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as percentage of Profit after Tax (PAT)(%) - Total spending on CSR is 13,960,887 which is 0.06% of PAT  List of activities in which expenditure in 4 above has been incurred:-  Education & Vocational Training  Social & Physical Infrastructure Development  Healthcare  Company’s direct contribution to community development projects - Amount and the details of the projects undertaken
  21. 21. Page | 21 POLICY SUGGESTIONS 1. Define messaging: Don’t strike blindly at different goals, such as preserving rainforests one quarter and then investing in a community project the next. Come up with causes that resonate with business culture, research the kind of support they need, then pick one and stick with it. One is enough for a small business – and don’t feel pressured to donate more funding or assistance than you can afford. 2. Involve customers: If company haven’t picked a cause yet, come up with a list of alternatives and ask their web site visitors and Facebook fans to vote on which one they would like to see their support. Or actively seek their assistance, such as bringing old but usable technology into their store so that they can donate them to students in underfunded schools. Make sure they offer a potential reward, such as holding a raffle for all participants. 3. Create a scorecard: Make sure it features achievable and measureable goals and keep it visible on their site, tracking their progress. Be honest about any setbacks – they want the tone to be authentic, not promotional. 4. Use social media: Don’t just tell theirr customers what they’re doing; solicit their ideas, experiences and concerns to get them invested in their projects. Make sure they use multiple digital platforms – such as blogs, Facebook, Twitter, and a YouTube channel – to reach people with different media preferences. 5. Partner with a third party: Forming an alliance with a non-profit will not only lend credibility to their efforts, but let they benefit from the non-profit’s greater experience in fundraising and philanthropy. The alliance will also offer an opportunity to blend customers and networks.
  22. 22. Page | 22 CONCLUSION Govrnance will become the key to sustainability in business. At the end of the day, building a large corporation is easy but building one of the most respected corporations in the world and sustaining it over many years is a big challenge. Only those companies that were built on a platform of strong corporate governance will earn respect from its stakeholders and enjoy a more sustainable growth. Hence Hero Motocorp. has chosen the following area:-  RIDE SAFE INDIA  HAMARI PARI  HAPPY EARTH  E2 – EDUCATE TO EMPOWER REFERENCES  http://www.heromotocorp.com/en-in/about-us.php  http://www.heromotocorp.com/en-in/csr.php  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evolution_of_corporate_social_responsibilit y_in_India

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