Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

UX maturity - how do you develop the UX practice in your organisation

Talk from Melbourne Leadership Meetup on 15 November 2016

UX maturity - how do you develop the UX practice in your organisation

  1. 1. UX Maturity – how do you develop the UX practice in your organisation Mags Hanley UX Management and Leadership Coach 15 November 2016
  2. 2. Introduction to me I am a UX Management and Leadership Coach. I teach and support UX professionals at all levels to grow in their UX practices. I bring my expertise of over 20 years in the digital to create actionable strategy and concrete plans for delivery of products and services.
  3. 3. Setting the scene
  4. 4. What is strategic impact of UX within an organisation?
  5. 5. State of UX in 2016- Leah Buley Lower Impact Higher Impact Place in the organisation Product (low) IT (lower) Marketing (lowest) Customer experience (highest) Ratio of developers to designers 1:20 1:4 Leadership roles UX Manager or below UX Director or above Process Basic UX processes – usability testing, flows and wireframes Framing the solution, working across channels, service design Measurement of UX impact Not measured – not even usability to ensure designs were effective Quantified baseline against Customer Satisfaction Changes connected to revenue http://www.creativebloq.com/features/the-state-of-ux-in-2016
  6. 6. UX Maturity models
  7. 7. What is a UX Maturity model? A UX Maturity Model is a framework that describes the different stages of UX within organisations. Generally they start with ‘Unorganised’ and end with ‘Leading the organisation’.
  8. 8. Jared Spool – 1997 - 2007 Stage Users want UX focuses on Developers focus on 1 Technology a.k.a. “Raw Iron” The basic capability Getting the technology working = The product works Technical issues and delivery 2 Features (a.k.a. “Checklist Battles”) The best set of features Getting the right features Adding features and fixing bugs 3 Experience (a.k.a “Productivit yWars”) To get their work done better and faster Getting the right experience = Easy to learn, fast, powerful Performance support, reducing technical support costs 4 Integration Transparency Lowest cost Integration into bigger experiences = The product is invisible Reducing costs or seeking new markets https://articles.uie.com/market_maturity/
  9. 9. Adaptive Path http://adaptivepath.org/uploads/documents/apr-005_businessvalue.pdf
  10. 10. Jacob Nielsen - 2006 UX Maturity Stage Featuring Time to next stage 1: Hostility Developers simply don’t want to hear about users or their needs Up to decades 2: Developer - Centred Design team relies on its own intuition 2‐3 years 3: Skunkworks Guerilla user research or external usability experts 2‐3 years 4: Dedicated Budget Usability is planned for 2‐3 years 5: Managed Someone to think about usability across the organisation 6‐7 years 6: Systematic Process Tracking user experience quality 6‐7 years 7: Integrated User Centred Design Employing usability data to determine what company should build ~ 20 years 8: User – Driven Corporation Usability affects corporate strategy and activities beyond interface design ~40 years to get from start http://www.nngroup.com/articles/usability-maturity-stages-1-4/
  11. 11. Jennifer Fraser and Scott Plewes - 2015 http://www.macadamian.com/2015/08/20/indicators-of-user-experience-maturity/
  12. 12. My take The last model – Frazer and Plewes provides a good model that can be used to measure UX Maturity thereby describing the level of impact UX has in the organisation. I like this model as it provides three metrics to measure the maturity:  Timing of the initial UX  Availability of resources  Leadership and Culture
  13. 13. Timing of the initial UX Timing of the UX is about WHEN the UX is performed in the development process. It moves from ‘none’ to ‘being an integral part of the strategy for the organisation’. To benchmark I consider both:  When in the development process the first method of UX is done  Integration of the UX within the whole product lifecycle
  14. 14. Availability of resources Availability of the resources is focused on WHO does the UX within the organisation. It ranges from ‘no-one’ to ‘a UX team with capabilities across all the UX sub-disciplines’. The two elements I use to benchmark are:  Type and roles of the people in the organisation performing UX  UX methods being performed
  15. 15. Leadership and Culture As a UX manager and Leader, this is the area that you are responsible for. The three elements to consider are:  Influence – Is UX seen as a servant to Product, Development or Creative; or does it have a seat at the table and is part of the scoping of products and services?  People leadership – Management, coaching and development of people  Design leadership – Are you inspiring, reviewing and improving the UX design of your team; expected to be doing the UX design, or leading using your design thinking to shape the organisation?
  16. 16. Examples
  17. 17. Argus Associates – 1999-2001 Maturity Measures Grade Timing of the initial UX Stage 3: starting IA/UX activities for customers at the beginning of projects Availability of resources Stage 3: Strong IA with increasing expertise in Usability Leadership and Culture Stage 3: Strong leadership Stage at start: Stage 3 Stage to aim for: Stage 4-5 Context  I moved to the US to be a Project Manager at Argus Associates – one of the first IA/UX Consultancies in the world  There was a team of 10 IAs, 3 project managers and a usability specialist.  The aim was to grow the Consulting business – hiring more people, doing leading edge work and developing tools that created the cornerstone of the practice. Tactical: Hire staff to do the work we were winning Strategic: Develop processes to be able to replicate methods; enabling leading teams to create world class, leading edge IA.
  18. 18. BBC – Setting up an IA practice - 2002 Maturity Measures Grade Timing of the initial UX Stage 2: No IA, limited UX Availability of resources Stage 2: No IAs, but some visual designers and usability professionals Leadership and Culture Stage 2: Emerging UX leadership, no IA leadership Stage at start: Stage 2 Stage to aim for: Stage 3 Context I was hired at the BBC to start an IA practice, in particular to describe and model the content so it could be used in CMS for multi-platform publishing. Tactical: Work on a English Regions CMS implementation to prove value and develop the skills set Strategic: Realised that there would always be multiple CMS, so create a content model that could be used across the organisation. Develop relationships across the organisation to increase influence
  19. 19. WTG – Shore up a UX practice – 2005-2011 Maturity Measures Grade Timing of the initial UX Stage 3: Simple UX process in most projects Availability of resources Stage 2: One visual designer Leadership and Culture Stage 1: No UX leadership Stage at start: Stage 2 Stage to aim for: Stage 3 Context WTG already had a UX practice with a designer, contract UXers and a front-end coder, but the work and the team were patchy - some good projects, mostly bad. Tactical: Lead by example, develop better proposals for work and win the work Strategic: Hire amazing core team of people who could handle any project; find UX-only projects, lead major projects with UX (like Census 2011) and develop services for the Public Sector
  20. 20. Now over to you…
  21. 21. Activity Alone using the hand out  Mark where your organisation is:  According the maturity model  The existing level of impact you have in the organisation  Identify what your end state is in the next 18-24 months  Write one tactical action to be completed within the next 6 months  Write one strategic action to be completed within 12 months For each action:  How it will achieve your goals  Identify people and resources needed to do it  Your allies  Potential roadblocks
  22. 22. Activity (continued) In a group  Review the hand out  Quiz the person on why that particular action  Identify one other tactical and strategic action that could be taken REMEMBER – this is workshop has a cone of silence Anything shared in this workshop cannot be talked about outside of the classroom without express permission.
  23. 23. Questions and comments ?
  24. 24. Thank you Mags Hanley Email: magshanley@gmail.com Twitter: @magshanley LinkedIn: https://au.linkedin.com/in/magshanley
  25. 25. Jennifer Fraser and Scott Plewes - 2015 http://www.macadamian.com/2015/08/20/indicators-of-user-experience-maturity/
  26. 26. Measure Current position 18-24 months UX Maturity • Timing • Resources • Leadership Strategic Impact UX Maturity Scorecard
  27. 27. Questions Current position What is your tactical action? How it will achieve your goals? Who do you need ( people and resources) to do it? Who are your allies? What are the potential roadblocks? How will you measure success? Other options Tactical action
  28. 28. Questions Current position What is your strategic action? How it will achieve your goals? Who do you need ( people and resources) to do it? Who are your allies? What are the potential roadblocks? How will you measure success? Other options Strategic action

×