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Developmental biology

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Developmental biology

  1. 1. Developmental BiologyDevelopmental Biology An IntroductionAn Introduction
  2. 2. Animal DevelopmentAnimal Development  How has the study ofHow has the study of development changed?development changed?
  3. 3. Animal DevelopmentAnimal Development What kinds of questions areWhat kinds of questions are developmental biologists asking?developmental biologists asking?
  4. 4. Animal DevelopmentAnimal Development How does the same genetic information result in different types of cells?
  5. 5. Animal DevelopmentAnimal Development  How is cell division regulated?How is cell division regulated?
  6. 6. Animal DevelopmentAnimal Development  How do cells form ordered structures?How do cells form ordered structures?
  7. 7. Animal DevelopmentAnimal Development  How are reproductiveHow are reproductive cells set apart?cells set apart?
  8. 8. Animal DevelopmentAnimal Development How do changes in development create new body forms and what changes are possible?
  9. 9. Animal DevelopmentAnimal Development  How do each of these contribute to the studyHow do each of these contribute to the study of development?of development?  comparative embryologycomparative embryology  evolutionary embryologyevolutionary embryology  teratologyteratology  mathematical modelingmathematical modeling
  10. 10. Comparative EmbryologyComparative Embryology  EpigenesisEpigenesis versusversus preformationpreformation
  11. 11. Comparative EmbryologyComparative Embryology  How does the concept of germ layers support epigenesis?How does the concept of germ layers support epigenesis?  How does the concept of induction fit in here?How does the concept of induction fit in here?
  12. 12. Comparative EmbryologyComparative Embryology  What principles didWhat principles did von Baer articulatevon Baer articulate with respect to vertebratewith respect to vertebrate development?development?
  13. 13. Comparative EmbryologyComparative Embryology  General features of large group of animalsGeneral features of large group of animals appear earlier than specialized features ofappear earlier than specialized features of smaller groupsmaller group  Less general characteristics develop from moreLess general characteristics develop from more generalgeneral
  14. 14. Comparative EmbryologyComparative Embryology  A particular type of embryo, instead of passingA particular type of embryo, instead of passing through adult stages of a lower form, departsthrough adult stages of a lower form, departs more and more from it.more and more from it.  Embryo of higher animal is only like earlyEmbryo of higher animal is only like early embryo of lower animal.embryo of lower animal.
  15. 15. Comparative EmbryologyComparative Embryology  How have fate mapsHow have fate maps contributed to ourcontributed to our understanding ofunderstanding of development?development?
  16. 16. Evolutionary EmbryologyEvolutionary Embryology  How have observations of embryos contributed to ourHow have observations of embryos contributed to our understanding of evolutionary relationships?understanding of evolutionary relationships?
  17. 17. Evolutionary EmbryologyEvolutionary Embryology  Why is the distinction between analogous andWhy is the distinction between analogous and homologous structures important?homologous structures important?
  18. 18. TeratologyTeratology How are malformations different from disruptions?
  19. 19. Mathematical ModelingMathematical Modeling  What’s the difference between isometric andWhat’s the difference between isometric and allometric growth?allometric growth?
  20. 20. Figure 1.20(1)Figure 1.20(1) Reaction-diffusionReaction-diffusion System of Pattern GenerationSystem of Pattern Generation
  21. 21. Figure 1.22Figure 1.22 Pigment patterns of zebrafishPigment patterns of zebrafish homozygous for the wild-type allele (A) and for threehomozygous for the wild-type allele (A) and for three different mutant alleles (B–D) of the leopard genedifferent mutant alleles (B–D) of the leopard gene

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