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Beat procrastination with the pomodoro technique

Got a big project to work on but don't know where to start? So you are procrastinating instead? Let's fix it right NOW.

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Beat procrastination with the pomodoro technique

  1. 1. How to beat procrastination with the POMODORO Technique Designed by Malithi Weerakkody
  2. 2. Hey!
  3. 3. Hey! I know what you’re doing…..!
  4. 4. How to beat|
  5. 5. You are procrastinating! How to beat procrastination |
  6. 6. You’ve got a BIG project to work on…
  7. 7. …but you don’t know where to start.
  8. 8. OK. Let’s fix that.
  9. 9. Here’s what you need…
  10. 10. Here’s what you need… A sheet of paper
  11. 11. Here’s what you need… A sheet of paper A pen
  12. 12. Here’s what you need… A sheet of paper A pen …and a timer
  13. 13. Here’s what you need… A sheet of paper A pen …and a timer or Any kind will do
  14. 14. Step 1 Set the timer for 25 minutes
  15. 15. 2500-words on Procrastination-related anxiety Deadline: 14th June 1. Google procrastination--definition Break your project down into smaller tasks. Step 2
  16. 16. Don’t worry about the order. 2500-words on Procrastination-related anxiety Deadline: 14th June 1. Google procrastination--definition 2. Google anxiety 3. Rough outline
  17. 17. Just keep working until the timer goes off. 2500-words on Procrastination-related anxiety Deadline: 14th June 1. Google procrastination--definition 2. Google anxiety 3. Rough outline 4. Find statistics >> Google Scholar 5.
  18. 18. You’re not allowed to do anything else during these 25 minutes.
  19. 19. Put your phone on airplane mode.
  20. 20. If you remember some other task…
  21. 21. If you remember some other task… …note it down and attend to it later.
  22. 22. If someone calls, tell them you’ll get back to them.
  23. 23. Focus intensely on the task at hand...
  24. 24. …until the timer goes off.
  25. 25. Set the timer for 5 minutes…… Step 3
  26. 26. …..and go PROCRASTINATE! For not more than 5 minutes!
  27. 27. …..and go PROCRASTINATE! For not more than 5 minutes! It’s your reward!
  28. 28. Congratulations! You just completed one POMODORO
  29. 29. Developed by Francesco Cirillo in the late 1980s. Francesco first used a tomato-shaped timer; hence the name Pomodoro. Means “Tomato” in Italian POMODORO Technique www. francescocirillo.com
  30. 30. POMODORO Technique
  31. 31. POMODORO Technique Breaks down work into manageable chunks.
  32. 32. A traditional Pomodoro POMODORO Technique
  33. 33. A traditional Pomodoro 5-minute Break 25-minute work session POMODORO Technique
  34. 34. 5-minute Break POMODORO Technique But you can change it to suit your rhythm. 15-minutes
  35. 35. 5-minute Break POMODORO Technique Or 35-minutes
  36. 36. After every 4 Pomodoros, you take a longer break. POMODORO Technique
  37. 37. After every 4 Pomodoros, you take a longer break. POMODORO Technique 20-minute break
  38. 38. …and repeat... POMODORO Technique
  39. 39. POMODORO Technique …until the project is done.
  40. 40. Fact 1 The science behind the Pomodoro Technique
  41. 41. People often procrastinate when a task is too big. conventional wisdom 1The science behind the Pomodoro Technique
  42. 42. 1The science behind the Pomodoro Technique Breaking the task down reduces overwhelm…
  43. 43. 1The science behind the Pomodoro Technique Breaking the task down reduces overwhelm… Personal experience ...and makes it more manageable.
  44. 44. Fact 2 The science behind the Pomodoro Technique
  45. 45. Distractions during work lower your IQ by 10%. (Hewlett-Packard, 2005) 2The science behind the Pomodoro Technique
  46. 46. Distractions during work lower your IQ by 10%. (Hewlett-Packard, 2005) Multitasking makes you 40% less productive. (Rubinstein, Meyer, & Evans, 2001) 2The science behind the Pomodoro Technique
  47. 47. Pomodoro Technique makes you super-focus on a single task… …and thus, improves productivity. 2The science behind the Pomodoro Technique
  48. 48. Fact 3 The science behind the Pomodoro Technique
  49. 49. Completing a Pomodoro gives a sense of achievement… 3The science behind the Pomodoro Technique
  50. 50. Completing a Pomodoro gives a sense of achievement… 3The science behind the Pomodoro Technique …which stimulates the brain to release dopamine. A neurotransmitter that plays a key role in pleasure and motivation.
  51. 51. The surge in dopamine makes you feel great and… 3The science behind the Pomodoro Technique
  52. 52. The surge in dopamine makes you feel great and… 3The science behind the Pomodoro Technique ...motivates your brain to keep working. (Wise, 2004 ; Berridge & Robinson, 1998; Arias-Carrión et al., 2010)
  53. 53. Fact 4 The science behind the Pomodoro Technique
  54. 54. 4The science behind the Pomodoro Technique The ticking clock and the 25–minute mini deadline …
  55. 55. 4The science behind the Pomodoro Technique The ticking clock and the 25–minute mini deadline … ...create a sense of urgency...
  56. 56. …that makes you experience the same last-minute adrenalin rush… 4The science behind the Pomodoro Technique
  57. 57. …that makes you experience the same last-minute adrenalin rush… ...and makes your brain jump into action. 4The science behind the Pomodoro Technique
  58. 58. Fact 5 The science behind the Pomodoro Technique
  59. 59. Short, controlled breaks 5The science behind the Pomodoro Technique
  60. 60. Short, controlled breaks recharge your brain… 5The science behind the Pomodoro Technique
  61. 61. (Ariga & Lleras, 2011) …and make you focus better. Short, controlled breaks recharge your brain… 5The science behind the Pomodoro Technique
  62. 62. Alright.. Go start your next POMODORO! break’s over!
  63. 63. References Cirillo,F. (2007) The Pomodoro Technique. Hewlett-Packard. (2005, April 22) Abuse of technology can reduce UK workers’ intelligence [Press release]. Retrieved from 22 https://goo.gl/7MAV6A Rubinstein, J. S., Meyer, D. E. & Evans, J. E. (2001). Executive Control of Cognitive Processes in Task Switching. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 27, 763-797. Wise, R. A. (2004). Dopamine, learning and motivation. Nature reviews neuroscience, 5(6), 483.
  64. 64. References Ariga, A., & Lleras, A. (2011). Brief and rare mental “breaks” keep you focused: Deactivation and reactivation of task goals preempt vigilance decrements. Cognition, 118(3), 439-443. Berridge, K. C., & Robinson, T. E. (1998). What is the role of dopamine in reward: hedonic impact, reward learning, or incentive salience?. Brain research reviews, 28(3), 309-369. Arias-Carrión, O., Stamelou, M., Murillo-Rodríguez, E., Menéndez- González, M., & Pöppel, E. (2010). Dopaminergic reward system: a short integrative review. International archives of medicine, 3(1), 24.
  65. 65. If you need help with your next presentation, I’d love to work with you. Hire me on Upwork.

Got a big project to work on but don't know where to start? So you are procrastinating instead? Let's fix it right NOW.

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