Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

OneIS CANHEIT V03 NN

425 views

Published on

  • Login to see the comments

OneIS CANHEIT V03 NN

  1. 1. People, process, data, and technology. ONE IS
  2. 2. RISK REGISTRY • No input or authority over colleges and other units when making independent IT-related decisions1 • Surprises caused by rogue IT-related activities (external to ICT)2 • Historical reputation of ICT amongst our stakeholders3 • Historical management of current and future expectations (to employees and stakeholders)4 • Institutional funds available to do new things5 • Clarity of ownership regarding systems, applications, and data6 • Awareness and agreement regarding the role of information systems at the university7 • Coordination of operational and project priorities8 • Coordination of resourcing for operational activities and project work9 • Clarity surrounding disaster recovery10 • Preparation for new and increasing compliance regulations11 • Deliver results based on enterprise architecture12
  3. 3. CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES • Multiple enterprise administration systems • Multiple data warehouses • Multiple education technologies (i.e. learning analytics) • Understanding of research computing availability Multiplicity of chaos • Vision established, strategic planning started • Level 2 maturity Project Portfolio Office • Stewardship established • Cultural inertia • Information policy Strategic changes underway • Metrics based communications started • Grow client service emphasis • Process improvement process started • Build enterprise architecture base for decision making Operational changes underway
  4. 4. VISION One I.S. Single Administration System Teaching & Learning Ecosystem Unified Research Computing
  5. 5. Project management Stewardship Planning Process improvement Client service Enterprise architecture Metrics Culture STRATEGIC PRIORITIES One I.S. Single Administration System Teaching & Learning Ecosystem Unified Research Computing
  6. 6. HOW DO WE COMPARE STRUCTURALLY? • Degree of Centralization by Staffing 2013 University of Saskatchewan GoodBad
  7. 7. Central IT Local IT Most Canadian Universities International University Trend CENTRAL VS. LOCAL CONTINUUM (2013) 7
  8. 8. WHY FIX? Professional management Central security Career paths Standard architecture Disciplined systems admin Improved service Single source of the truth Centralize service delivery Re-purpose staffing Lower support costs Realize economies of scale - Technology - People management - Shared SMEs Mitigaterisk Reducecost
  9. 9. HOW TO FIX?
  10. 10. PROGRESS
  11. 11. HOW DO WE COMPARE FINANCIALLY? • IT Spend as a % of Total Revenue 2013 University of Saskatchewan U15 who included rogue ITU15 who excluded rogue IT
  12. 12. WHERE DOES IT GO? • Budget by Service Area $2.968 M $2.689 M $2.623 M $2.483 M$1.948 M $1.290 M $1.226 M $.979 M $.970 M $.879 M $.782 M $.70 3 M $.630 M $.567 M $.427 M $.171 M Platform Services Institutional Systems (ERPs) Teaching and Learning Support and Systems Unit IT Support Specialized Systems (unit specific) End-User Help and Training Campus Network Web Services Data Management Research Support Telephones Institutional Licensing & Acquisition Central Printing E-Communication & Collaboration Identity and Access Management Security
  13. 13. WHERE DOES IT GO? • Budget by Service Area 14% 13% 12% 12%9% 6% 6% 5% 5% 4% 4% 3% 3% 3% 2% 1% Platform Services Institutional Systems (ERPs) Teaching and Learning Support and Systems Unit IT Support Specialized Systems (unit specific) End-User Help and Training Campus Network Web Services Data Management Research Support Telephones Institutional Licensing & Acquisition Central Printing E-Communication & Collaboration Identity and Access Management Security
  14. 14. WHERE DOES IT GO? $0 $500,000 $1,000,000 $1,500,000 $2,000,000 $2,500,000 $3,000,000 $3,500,000 Service Area Information Systems 2015/16 Budgeted Expenses Other Funding Envelope Funding
  15. 15. ONEIS PROJECTS: ONE VENDOR • Today • Student systems • Finance systems • In progress • Document management system • In discussion for the future • Relationship management • Recruit • Retain • Advance • Payroll cycle change • One payment gateway RMS (Relationship Management System) Student Enrolment Advancement Administration Student Retention Research
  16. 16. ONEIS PROJECTS: UNIFIED GOALS • uSales • Bookstore system • Non-credit registration • eProcurement • OneCard • Unified communication • Instant messaging • Presence • Video chat • No phones infrastructure “My office is a technology museum.”
  17. 17. ADMINISTRATIVE SYSTEMS ROADMAP
  18. 18. ONEIS PROJECTS: SINGLE SOURCE OF THE TRUTH
  19. 19. STEWARDSHIP • ITServices acts as a steward for the information systems resources • Stewardship process engages stakeholders in making decisions • ITServices’ role is to facilitate the process and implement the decisions
  20. 20. HOW DO WE CHANGE? Processes Projects Organizations only do two things … Ongoing day-to-day operational work. Activities with a fixed start & finish, and deliver value. … organizations use projects to execute change.
  21. 21. 22 “Invest in the future”“Keep the lights on” 25% Projects 75% Operations Traditional I.T. Resource Allocation 75% Projects 25% Operations Ideal I.S. Resource Allocation I.S. INVESTMENT STRATEGY One I.S.
  22. 22. Fit Utility Balance
  23. 23. Control Mechanisms Steering Commi ee Project Flow Por olio assessment: • Fit • Align with strategy • U lity • Qualita ve benefits • Quan ta ve benefits • Costs • Risks • Balance • University priori es Status repor ng Fiscal budget Risk plan Scope Resource plan Schedule Quality plan Communica on plan Vendor management Base budget Support resources Benefit measures Ini a on Planning Execu on Closure Asset Maintenance Reject Approve Not Needed Cancel Not Successful Approve Con nue Execu on Not Accepted Accepted Reject Not Sufficient Approve Plan Project Document Implement Plan Revisions Progress Shutdown Project Final Product Maintain Asset Ini ate Next Phase New Project Support Work Issue log Change control Develop Project Charter Document Client Needs Benefit Realiza on Review Deliverables Review Charter Review Plan Monitor Status PROJECT MANAGEMENT PROCESS • One process applies to all projects • Projects directly tied to stewardship steering committees
  24. 24. PLANNING • “Plans are nothing. Planning is everything.” (Eisenhower) • Consultative planning model process engages the entire campus • Includes all information systems services providers (not just central I.S.) • Links vision + strategy + annual planning + personal performance plans Vision Strategy Operations Tactics Fix Plan STRATEGIC PLANNING ANNUAL SERVICE PLAN PERFORMANCE PLAN STEWARDSHIP Check Annually evaluate strategic success Measure goal progress quarterly Assess personal achievements Do DECISION RECOMMENDATIONS PROGRAM INITIATIVES INTEGRATED PROJECTS ASSIGNED TASKS
  25. 25. INTERNAL PREPARATION • Client service orientation • Scalability of current structure • Need to re-distribute work more evenly • Clarity of roles • Balanced scope of organization
  26. 26. Client Services Glenn Hollinger, Director Equipment Services Manager Unit IT Support Manager Research Computing Manager Institutional Sales Manager Applications Monisha Shukla, Director Platform Services Chad Coller, Director Security Lawrence Dobranski, Director ICT Mark Roman, CIO and AVP Human Resources Support SME Student Information Systems Manager Web Applications Manager Business Processes Manager Integration & DataServices Manager Financeand Administration Manager Database Administration Manager Network&TelephoneServices Manager System Administration Manager Enterprise Content Mgmt Manager Analysis & Reporting Manager ICT Organization Structure September 10, 2014 EAMProject Project Manager UnivRS Project Manager AcademicSupport Manager Project Portfolio Office Manager Business Analyst
  27. 27. Information Systems Mark Roman, CIO and AVP Information Systems Organization Structure October 8, 2014 UnivRS (co-managed with OVPR) Project Portfolio Office Manager Client Services Shari Baraniuk, Director Equipment Services Manager Unit Support Manager Research Computing Manager Process Support and Improvement Team Lead Applications Monisha Shukla, Director Platform Services Chad Coller, Director Access and Compliance Lawrence Dobranski, Director Administration Systems: Student, Finance, ACE Manager Reporting and Data Services Manager Academicand Web Services Manager uSales Project Manager Financeand Administration Manager Database Administration Manager Network & TelephoneServices Manager System Administration Manager Digital Workspace and Collaboration Team Lead StrategicServices Glenn Hollinger, Director EAMProject Project Manager Service Desk and Training Manager Licensing and Acquisitions Manager Security Architect Identity Management Team Lead Enterprise Architecture Architect College Support SMEs Human Resources Support SME Mandate To implement and support all applications systems at the university via software development, acquisition, and integration with the goal of supporting the university s strategy of One I.S. We willfocus on moving to a single administration system, a cohesive teaching learning ecosystem, and creating a single source ofthe truth in data and reporting. Changes Creation of increased focus on client areas of interest: teaching & learning, administration, reporting, and data. Elevation of strategic applications project management to increase senior focus on these key initiatives. Alignment ofreporting & data resources. Mandate To ensuretheentire Information Systems department provides the best possible client service and delivery to all staff, students, faculty, alumni, guests, and other stakeholders throughout the university community. As part ofthe OneI.S. vision, wewill strive to create a unified single point of contact for all information help and support across campus. Changes Renewed focus on customer service Attention to convergencein the classroom and other venues of AV and computer technologies Greater integration of support and services with College IT units, particularly shadow IT staff. Mandate To deliver core infrastructure technology support to the university, including networks, servers, telephony, data centres, enterprise software tools (Exchange, SharePoint), disaster recovery, and operations management. This group is responsiblefor the prudent management of all production systems and accountable for all change control to this environment. Changes Broadening of management structure Increased opportunities to integrate core platform services with research networks, high performance computing, and other research infrastructure. Mandate To continuously improve the quality and trust of all information systems at the university. Through consistent architecturedesign, better business processes, improved staff support, and formalized strategic and annual planning processes, allinformation systems will deliver greater value to theinstitution. Changes Consolidation ofpillar services into an integrated unit. Introduction of enterprise architecture Integration of business functions Provision of university-wideinformation systems career paths. Mandate To manageand mitigateinformation systems risks associated with people, processes, data, and technologies. We willemphasize risk prevention over crisis reaction. Access to systems is enabled by balancing client service with institutional risk. Complianceissues are managed by applying by due diligence to legislated requirements. Changes Information security and identity management are brought together to improveintegration and develop new opportunities for improving secure access to services. Support for data privacy, information systems legislative issues, policy development, and risk assessment. Administration Systems: HR, Facilities, Consumer Services Manager Mandate To develop and socialize a project management process and culture throughout the Information Systems organization and to improvethe return on investment of all information system project initiatives. Changes The officewill continueto report direct report directly to theCIO during the implementation and establishment stages of the office. Future transition into Strategic Services is expected to integrate with other enterprise-level activities. Mandate To deliver the UnivRS project on time, on scope, and on budgetwhileensuring the project stays within the boundaries of the enterprise architectureand does not overlap in any way with existing administration applications systems. Changes Unification ofproject activities into a singlepoint of controland management. Implementation of the Project Portfolio Office s project management standards.
  28. 28. Information Systems Mark Roman, CIO and AVP Information Systems Organization Structure October 8, 2014 UnivRS (co-managed with OVPR) Project Portfolio Office Manager Client Services Shari Baraniuk, Director Equipment Services Manager Unit Support Manager Research Computing Manager Process Support and Improvement Team Lead Applications Monisha Shukla, Director Platform Services Chad Coller, Director Access and Compliance Lawrence Dobranski, Director Administration Systems: Student, Finance, ACE Manager Reporting and Data Services Manager Academicand Web Services Manager uSales Project Manager Financeand Administration Manager Database Administration Manager Network & TelephoneServices Manager System Administration Manager Digital Workspace and Collaboration Team Lead StrategicServices Glenn Hollinger, Director EAMProject Project Manager Service Desk and Training Manager Licensing and Acquisitions Manager Security Architect Identity Management Team Lead Enterprise Architecture Architect College Support SMEs Human Resources Support SME Mandate To implement and support all applications systems at the university via software development, acquisition, and integration with the goal of supporting the university s strategy of One I.S. We willfocus on moving to a single administration system, a cohesive teaching learning ecosystem, and creating a single source ofthe truth in data and reporting. Changes Creation of increased focus on client areas of interest: teaching & learning, administration, reporting, and data. Elevation of strategic applications project management to increase senior focus on these key initiatives. Alignment ofreporting & data resources. Mandate To ensuretheentire Information Systems department provides the best possible client service and delivery to all staff, students, faculty, alumni, guests, and other stakeholders throughout the university community. As part ofthe OneI.S. vision, wewill strive to create a unified single point of contact for all information help and support across campus. Changes Renewed focus on customer service Attention to convergencein the classroom and other venues of AV and computer technologies Greater integration of support and services with College IT units, particularly shadow IT staff. Mandate To deliver core infrastructure technology support to the university, including networks, servers, telephony, data centres, enterprise software tools (Exchange, SharePoint), disaster recovery, and operations management. This group is responsiblefor the prudent management of all production systems and accountable for all change control to this environment. Changes Broadening of management structure Increased opportunities to integrate core platform services with research networks, high performance computing, and other research infrastructure. Mandate To continuously improve the quality and trust of all information systems at the university. Through consistent architecturedesign, better business processes, improved staff support, and formalized strategic and annual planning processes, allinformation systems will deliver greater value to theinstitution. Changes Consolidation ofpillar services into an integrated unit. Introduction of enterprise architecture Integration of business functions Provision of university-wideinformation systems career paths. Mandate To manageand mitigateinformation systems risks associated with people, processes, data, and technologies. We willemphasize risk prevention over crisis reaction. Access to systems is enabled by balancing client service with institutional risk. Complianceissues are managed by applying by due diligence to legislated requirements. Changes Information security and identity management are brought together to improveintegration and develop new opportunities for improving secure access to services. Support for data privacy, information systems legislative issues, policy development, and risk assessment. Administration Systems: HR, Facilities, Consumer Services Manager Mandate To develop and socialize a project management process and culture throughout the Information Systems organization and to improvethe return on investment of all information system project initiatives. Changes The officewill continueto report direct report directly to theCIO during the implementation and establishment stages of the office. Future transition into Strategic Services is expected to integrate with other enterprise-level activities. Mandate To deliver the UnivRS project on time, on scope, and on budgetwhileensuring the project stays within the boundaries of the enterprise architectureand does not overlap in any way with existing administration applications systems. Changes Unification ofproject activities into a singlepoint of controland management. Implementation of the Project Portfolio Office s project management standards. ORGANIZATION CHANGE • Merge rogue IT units in central Audio Visual Services Web Development Facilities IT Finance IT Student IT College of Education College of Vet Med College of Medicine Printing Consumer Services HR IT Advancement IT
  29. 29. CLIENT SERVICE We will compete for our clients Values • Leadership by example • Live the client service value Culture • Past: technology with service component • Now: service with technology component • Pull vs. push Discipline • Define expected behaviours • Measure performance • Build client assessment into appraisals
  30. 30. PROCESS IMPROVEMENT - CAB A change to a service is required. This request can come from a client, vendor, or from within Systems. Complete Change to production system? This change is not required to follow CAB processes No Yes Has testing been completed? Test this change in development/pre- production prior to proceeding No Have affected clients been consulted? Work with clients to perform UAT and select a date for the change No Change coordinator/ implementer Prepare the Change Request using the CAB Change Request template. Change Request Yes Recording secretary CAB Change is not approved Complete the change using the plan documented in the Change Request. Track progress in the ticket identified as the Change Log in the Change Request. Did you experience issues? Change is approved No Document the issues in the CAB Issues Doc template; be sure to include the lessons that you learned as a result of the issue(s). Yes Issues Doc Recording secretary CAB Document/revise procedures required to avoid this issue in the future. Document is reviewed, no additional issues identified Complete Outstanding issues remain Start Systems CAB Methodology Change Request Process Flow Diagram Yes Change Request Process Flow Diagram All institutions manage systems with processes – knowingly or not. They may do them well or they may do them wretchedly, but they always do them. (~ Peter Drucker)
  31. 31. METRICS
  32. 32. Data Applications Platforms Security Reuse before Buy Buy before Build Design for the Enterprise Minimize redundancy Security is built in not bolted on ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE How What
  33. 33. CULTURE Vision We will be the most responsive, innovative, and trusted higher education information systems organization in Canada. Mission Information Systems exists to realize the dreams and aspirations of its stakeholders.
  34. 34. CULTURE We will: unify people, processes, data, and technologies throughout the university to achieve our mission. balance the efficiencies of centralized enterprise services with the effectiveness of local service delivery. demonstrate our value every day by providing excellent client service. facilitate decisions through a stewardship process led by our stakeholders. use an enterprise architecture to guide the design of all information systems. use industry standard project management processes to deliver all projects. use industry standard information systems management processes to deliver all services.
  35. 35. ONE IS MATURITY MODEL
  36. 36. MATURITY & PRODUCTIVITY
  37. 37. MATURITY & MORALE
  38. 38. MATURITY & COST
  39. 39. MATURITY & VALUE
  40. 40. WHY IS ONEIS COMPLICATED?
  41. 41. People, process, data, and technology. ONE IS

×