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Ambivalence towards a prospective pregnancy among contraceptive users<br />Ilene Speizer, PhD<br />LailiIrani, MD<br />Jan...
Overview<br />	Analysisusing data from a one-year follow-up study with reversible method users conducted in Honduras, 2006...
Introduction<br />Inconsistent fertility motivations and contraceptive use is common among contraceptive users and non-use...
Objectives of this study<br />To determine women’s stated reasons for reporting inconsistencies between fertility motivati...
Study Sites<br />
Data- Panel study collected in 2 rounds<br />Baseline exit interviews with 800 women aged 15-44, attending a FP appointmen...
Methodology<br />At baseline and follow-up, women asked how much of a problem it would be if they got pregnant in the next...
Analysis Sample at baseline (n=633)<br />Young (&lt;30 years old)<br />Married/in union (94%)<br />Urban residents (80%)<b...
How much of a problem would it be to get pregnant? <br />
Responses to problem question and contraceptive use, at follow-up<br />Contraceptive users:<br />53% gave a response of “n...
Common reasons for why women responded “no problem,” among users<br />
Common reasons for why women responded “small”/ “big” problem, among non-users<br />
Strengths of the study<br />This study demonstrates inconsistencies in fertility motivations and contraceptive behaviors<b...
Limitations of the study<br />Cannot compare the reasons women gave over time<br />Cannot determine why women expressed in...
Discussion<br />Inconsistent fertility attitudes and use are common<br />Fertility attitudes can change over time, even th...
Thank you<br />MEASURE Evaluation is funded by the U.S. Agency for <br />International Development and is implemented by t...
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Ambivalence towards a prospective pregnancy among contraceptive users

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Ambivalence towards a prospective pregnancy among contraceptive users

  1. 1. Ambivalence towards a prospective pregnancy among contraceptive users<br />Ilene Speizer, PhD<br />LailiIrani, MD<br />Janine Barden-O’Fallon, PhD<br />Jessica Levy, MPH<br />
  2. 2. Overview<br /> Analysisusing data from a one-year follow-up study with reversible method users conducted in Honduras, 2006-2007<br />The study was funded by USAID and implemented by MEASURE Evaluation in collaboration with Programaspara el Desarollo de Infantes y Mujeres (PRODIM)<br />
  3. 3. Introduction<br />Inconsistent fertility motivations and contraceptive use is common among contraceptive users and non-users<br />Estimates of unintended pregnancies and unmet need for contraception do not account for these inconsistencies towards a future pregnancy<br />
  4. 4. Objectives of this study<br />To determine women’s stated reasons for reporting inconsistencies between fertility motivations and contraceptive use behaviors <br />Examine changes in fertility desires over a one-year period among women using contraceptives predominantly to space birth <br />
  5. 5. Study Sites<br />
  6. 6. Data- Panel study collected in 2 rounds<br />Baseline exit interviews with 800 women aged 15-44, attending a FP appointment in selected health facilities in which they received the injectable, IUD, or oral contraceptive pill<br />Women were both new and continuing users<br />There were no quotas by type of method<br />Follow-up interviews completed with 671 (84%) 1 year later<br />
  7. 7. Methodology<br />At baseline and follow-up, women asked how much of a problem it would be if they got pregnant in the next few weeks: big problem, small problem, no problem<br />At follow-up, women gave reasons for why they had responded as they did<br />
  8. 8. Analysis Sample at baseline (n=633)<br />Young (&lt;30 years old)<br />Married/in union (94%)<br />Urban residents (80%)<br />Parity &lt;/= 1 (44%)<br />72% injectables, 22% IUD, 7% pills <br />
  9. 9. How much of a problem would it be to get pregnant? <br />
  10. 10. Responses to problem question and contraceptive use, at follow-up<br />Contraceptive users:<br />53% gave a response of “no problem”<br />Non-users:<br />52% gave a response of “big”/”small” problem, indicating unmet need<br />
  11. 11. Common reasons for why women responded “no problem,” among users<br />
  12. 12. Common reasons for why women responded “small”/ “big” problem, among non-users<br />
  13. 13. Strengths of the study<br />This study demonstrates inconsistencies in fertility motivations and contraceptive behaviors<br />Includes novel question asking how much of a problem it would be if women became pregnant soon<br />Gain a better understanding of women’s strength of motivation to avoid pregnancy<br />Fertility desires are measured over time<br />
  14. 14. Limitations of the study<br />Cannot compare the reasons women gave over time<br />Cannot determine why women expressed inconsistent attitudes and behaviors <br />The reasons reported were the first reasons women stated, not necessarily the most important <br />Might have been using hormonal method to control menstrual problems and not for contraception<br />
  15. 15. Discussion<br />Inconsistent fertility attitudes and use are common<br />Fertility attitudes can change over time, even though contraceptive use is continued<br />FP counseling on adherence behavior may address attitude of inevitability towards pregnancy<br />Child spacing important issue; useful for advocacy<br />
  16. 16. Thank you<br />MEASURE Evaluation is funded by the U.S. Agency for <br />International Development and is implemented by the<br />Carolina Population Center at the University of North <br />Carolina at Chapel Hill in partnership with Futures Group<br />International, ICF Macro, John Snow, Inc., Management <br />Sciences for Health, and Tulane University. The views <br />expressed in this presentation do not necessarily reflect<br />the views of USAID or the United States Government.<br />

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