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Contraceptive discontinuation in urban Honduras<br />Janine Barden-O’Fallon, PhD<br />Ilene Speizer, PhD<br />University o...
Overview<br />	Results from a one-year follow-up study with reversible method users conducted in Honduras, 2006-2007<br />...
Contraceptive Discontinuation<br />Common, though varies by country<br />Most common during first 12 months of use<br />Co...
Objective<br />To determine how multiple factors affect contraceptive discontinuation among users of temporary methods ove...
Study Sites<br />
Data: Panel study collected in 2 rounds<br />Baseline exit interviews with 800 women aged 15-44, attending a FP appointmen...
Study sample at baseline (n=671)<br />Young (94% under age 35)<br />Educated (30% reached secondary or higher)<br />Parity...
Method use by status of user at Baseline; N=671<br />
Results:  Discontinuation was common…<br />
…But many switched to another method<br />
Multivariate analysis:  Cox proportional hazards models<br />Model 1:  Time until discontinuation of baseline method<br />...
Demographic characteristics<br />***<br />***<br />**<br />Note:  Only significant Hazard Ratios shown on this and followi...
Fertility motivations & discussions with family and friends<br />^<br />**<br />
Experience with side effects<br />
Service quality<br />^<br />
Discussion<br />More than 4 out of 10 women discontinued the baseline method<br />Living in rural areas may limit women’s ...
Thank you<br />MEASURE Evaluation is funded by the U.S. Agency for <br />International Development and is implemented by t...
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Contraceptive discontinuation in urban Honduras

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Contraceptive discontinuation in urban Honduras

  1. 1. Contraceptive discontinuation in urban Honduras<br />Janine Barden-O’Fallon, PhD<br />Ilene Speizer, PhD<br />University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA<br />29 September 2009<br />
  2. 2. Overview<br /> Results from a one-year follow-up study with reversible method users conducted in Honduras, 2006-2007<br />The study was funded by USAID and implemented by MEASURE Evaluation in collaboration with Programaspara el Desarollo de Infantes y Mujeres (PRODIM)<br />
  3. 3. Contraceptive Discontinuation<br />Common, though varies by country<br />Most common during first 12 months of use<br />Contributes to unmet need<br />Can lead to unplanned pregnancy and unwanted births, resulting in negative public health outcomes<br />
  4. 4. Objective<br />To determine how multiple factors affect contraceptive discontinuation among users of temporary methods over a one-year period <br />Demographic characteristics <br />Fertility motivations <br />Partner engagement<br />Quality of FP services <br />Experience of side effects<br />Method characteristics<br />
  5. 5. Study Sites<br />
  6. 6. Data: Panel study collected in 2 rounds<br />Baseline exit interviews with 800 women aged 15-44, attending a FP appointment in selected health facilities in which they received the injectable, IUD, or oral contraceptive pill<br />Women were both new and continuing users <br />There were no quotas by type of method<br />Follow-up interviews completed with 671 (84%) 1 year later<br />
  7. 7. Study sample at baseline (n=671)<br />Young (94% under age 35)<br />Educated (30% reached secondary or higher)<br />Parity ≥ 1<br />Married/in union (89%)<br />Urban residents (77%)<br />Desire to space a birth 2+ years (50%) or no more children (34%)<br />
  8. 8. Method use by status of user at Baseline; N=671<br />
  9. 9. Results: Discontinuation was common…<br />
  10. 10. …But many switched to another method<br />
  11. 11. Multivariate analysis: Cox proportional hazards models<br />Model 1: Time until discontinuation of baseline method<br />Model 2: Time until first episode of non-use of any method (Model 2)<br /> Covariates: demographic characteristics, fertility motivations and family engagement, experience of side effects, baseline service quality, and user status at baseline<br />Stratified by baseline method<br />
  12. 12. Demographic characteristics<br />***<br />***<br />**<br />Note: Only significant Hazard Ratios shown on this and following slides<br />
  13. 13. Fertility motivations & discussions with family and friends<br />^<br />**<br />
  14. 14. Experience with side effects<br />
  15. 15. Service quality<br />^<br />
  16. 16. Discussion<br />More than 4 out of 10 women discontinued the baseline method<br />Living in rural areas may limit women’s ability to successfully switch methods<br />Service quality had little effect on discontinuation<br />Family and friends may support continuation<br />
  17. 17. Thank you<br />MEASURE Evaluation is funded by the U.S. Agency for <br />International Development and is implemented by the<br />Carolina Population Center at the University of North <br />Carolina at Chapel Hill in partnership with Futures Group<br />International, ICF Macro, John Snow, Inc., Management <br />Sciences for Health, and Tulane University. The views <br />expressed in this presentation do not necessarily reflect<br />the views of USAID or the United States Government.<br />

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