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Food Security Summer Courses 
Tulane University Summer Courses 
in Italy 
2015 – 9th edition
• Why Studying Food Security and Humanitarian 
Logistics in Italy 
• Three complementary courses 
• Methodology and approa...
Why studying Food Security in Italy 
Italy is home to the three UN organizations with mandate on food security and agricul...
“ 
” 
…those are the classes 
that made my 
grad school degree 
worth more than just 
the piece of paper 
I got at the end...
Why studying Food Security in Italy – 2 
Italy relies strongly on local food systems. In some 
areas they are resisting th...
“ My experience in Italy shaped my world view in unique 
and important ways. The classes were stimulating, the 
environmen...
Why humanitarian logistics in Italy 
• In Brindisi, Italy there is the HQ of the UN logistics humanitarian depot network (...
“ I knew I had an interest in food, but I hadn’t known much about food 
security or systems logistics until usurping this ...
Three courses and three different angles 
1. Food Security Information Systems and Logistics 
May 18 – 29 2015 
2. Food Se...
Food Security Information Systems 
and Logistics 
- A number of pioneering efforts in food security information systems 
t...
“ The logistics and information systems class 
was a fun, hands-on learning experience. 
The simulation lab taught me GPS ...
Food Security and food aid 
in humanitarian contexts 
• Food aid continues to be the single largest component of internati...
“ Initially, I took this course to be a more well-rounded 
professional since I did not have much experience in food 
secu...
Food Security and Resilience 
• Resilience —the capacity for communities and households to 
prevent, mitigate and recover ...
“ That course was definitely the highlight of my Tulane 
experience and one that I reference often. 
It was an incredible ...
Methodology and Approach 
• Mix of lessons, hands on lab, field visits, individual 
reading, students’ research, direct ex...
Timing and logistics 
• The courses are proposed in sequence and cost managed to allow and encourage for full 
participati...
Accomodation 
• The campus where the Food Security Courses are hold is an ancient 
Franciscan Convent in rural Italy, half...
Food 
• Fresh meals based on local seasonal and mostly 
organic produces are catered in campus or in 
nearby restaurants. ...
Travel 
• Local travel is organized by taxi van, minibus, 
urban taxi, underground, train, according to 
need and availabi...
Thank You! 
• For more information and to apply: 
– Go to: http://www.payson.tulane.edu/si 
– Send an email to paysonsumme...
Tulane Payson Center for International Development: 2015 Italy Global Development Summer Institute
Tulane Payson Center for International Development: 2015 Italy Global Development Summer Institute
Tulane Payson Center for International Development: 2015 Italy Global Development Summer Institute
Tulane Payson Center for International Development: 2015 Italy Global Development Summer Institute
Tulane Payson Center for International Development: 2015 Italy Global Development Summer Institute
Tulane Payson Center for International Development: 2015 Italy Global Development Summer Institute
Tulane Payson Center for International Development: 2015 Italy Global Development Summer Institute
Tulane Payson Center for International Development: 2015 Italy Global Development Summer Institute
Tulane Payson Center for International Development: 2015 Italy Global Development Summer Institute
Tulane Payson Center for International Development: 2015 Italy Global Development Summer Institute
Tulane Payson Center for International Development: 2015 Italy Global Development Summer Institute
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Tulane Payson Center for International Development: 2015 Italy Global Development Summer Institute

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Every Summer, the Payson Center for International Development offers intensive, two (2) to three (3) week long study-abroad programs with one (1), two (2) or three (3) courses per location. Courses are open to graduate students and non-Tulane graduate level-students. All courses earn three (3) credits. The cost varies based on location and number of courses taken in one location. (Note: Price does not include airfare).

For Summer 2015, the Payson Center for International Development is pleased to offer courses in five (5) locations as part of the 2015 Global Development Summer Institute.

Ethiopia
Italy
Nepal
Myanmar
Panama

For information go to: http://www.payson.tulane.edu/si

Published in: Education
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Tulane Payson Center for International Development: 2015 Italy Global Development Summer Institute

  1. 1. Food Security Summer Courses Tulane University Summer Courses in Italy 2015 – 9th edition
  2. 2. • Why Studying Food Security and Humanitarian Logistics in Italy • Three complementary courses • Methodology and approach • Timing and logistics
  3. 3. Why studying Food Security in Italy Italy is home to the three UN organizations with mandate on food security and agriculture: – Food and Agriculture Organisation – World Food Programme – International Fund for Agriculture Food security policies have important players in the organisations focused on food. Food aid continues to be the single largest component of international humanitarian response activities. Key decisions are being made and solutions are being found to enhance food security at the Rome-based agencies of the United Nations. Italy hosts the European Food Safety Agency mandated with scientific research on new industrial food additives. In Italy the organisation Slow Food was born and then extended to the whole world to claim for production of good, clean and fair food as driving principles of food and agriculture policies During the three courses the students visit the Rome based UN organisations HQs and meet with UN officers. Lectures and presentations are given on themes and research always very central and key to latest understandings and policy debate on food security. Visit include Slow Food HQs, University and Study Center in Bra (Turin).
  4. 4. “ ” …those are the classes that made my grad school degree worth more than just the piece of paper I got at the end of it. Bijorn Betzler, edition 2013 Emergency Program Manager, Food for Peace at Mercy Corps.
  5. 5. Why studying Food Security in Italy – 2 Italy relies strongly on local food systems. In some areas they are resisting the transformation of the globalization, in others they are being created by intentional efforts of movements of agriculturalist and consumers. During courses, students learn and exercise on qualitative and quantitative research techniques, also by meeting and interviewing with local food producers and family farming business.
  6. 6. “ My experience in Italy shaped my world view in unique and important ways. The classes were stimulating, the environment was one of a kind; I cannot recommend this program enough. It changes the way you look at the world, and the way you interact with the world, and more than any other coursework I think being with Professor Morrow in Italy inspired the kind of health advocate I want to be. I'm now in my second year at Tulane Medical, and I dream about the lake and that summer often. ” Giacomo Tomasello, edition 2011 MSC, ENS MC USNR
  7. 7. Why humanitarian logistics in Italy • In Brindisi, Italy there is the HQ of the UN logistics humanitarian depot network (UNHRD) • The Brindisi hub serves the prepositioning and immediate transport requirements of more than 40 emergency response organizations • Brindisi hosts the largest basis for the peacekeeping operations logistics support in the world • UNHRD became a center for the study and practice of humanitarian logistics • Imperial Rome was home to the first governmental food aid programme known in history Field visits include trips to UN premises in Brindisi, meetings with key UN officers of logistic services. Itinerant lessons to the ancient Roman coast town of Ostia where food aid ration for the ancient Rome where baked are also featured in the program.
  8. 8. “ I knew I had an interest in food, but I hadn’t known much about food security or systems logistics until usurping this DRLS opportunity. It turned out to be pivotal in my education and my career choices. The month I spent learning from Nathan and Sabrina was some of the most fruitful time of my entire MPH. The information I gleaned was directly applicable to my career in global public health, and the enjoyment I felt experiencing each lesson in Bolsena will stay with me for a very long time. The reading assigned in these classes, even, is now on my Kindle for leisurely understanding of systems, and I use much of the information from Italy now working in Southern Africa. If I could take these classes again, I would in a heartbeat. I’m extremely grateful for having had the opportunity to learn about everything from need and resilience, to WFP and Slow Foods, to spiral gardening and the vineyards of Tuscany. These classes opened my eyes… my stomach… and my world. I found my passion in summer 2013. ” Camille Elyse Jones, edition 2013 MPH Candidate, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine Masters International Peace Corps Volunteer Botswana 2013-2015
  9. 9. Three courses and three different angles 1. Food Security Information Systems and Logistics May 18 – 29 2015 2. Food Security and food aid in humanitarian contexts June 8 – 19 2015 3. Food Security and Resilience June 22 – 4 July 2015
  10. 10. Food Security Information Systems and Logistics - A number of pioneering efforts in food security information systems to analyze vulnerability and target humanitarian response also began at the UN Rome-based agencies. The current practice and history of these efforts are the subject of course work and field visits for this course - Key stakeholder: UNHRD, head of the logistic network for prepositioning goods for humanitarian response Focus on systems, procedures and infrastructures for producing and handling information on food security, vulnerability, response.
  11. 11. “ The logistics and information systems class was a fun, hands-on learning experience. The simulation lab taught me GPS mapping skills, which helped me secure a spot in the first ever joint Global Education Cluster Child Protection Working Group Information Management training, which is what led me to my job co-leading the Education Cluster in Mali. Sarah Bellotti, edition 2013 Information Manager, Education Cluster at Save the Children”
  12. 12. Food Security and food aid in humanitarian contexts • Food aid continues to be the single largest component of international humanitarian response activities. When it comes to food security, key decisions are being made and solutions are being found at the Rome-based agencies of the United Nations in partnership with diplomatic missions and international civil society present in Italy. • Key stakeholder: WFP, the largest humanitarian organization in the world and the logistics leader for the UN system (“Logistic Cluster). • Focus on current food assistance policies and their evolution. • Understanding of processes and components of food aid interventions. • Familiarization with humanitarian response challenges.
  13. 13. “ Initially, I took this course to be a more well-rounded professional since I did not have much experience in food security, but this was hands down one of the best decisions I made in graduate school. This program will ignite a passion in you for food you never knew you had. The experiences afforded to you by way of local producers all the way to international humanitarian agency officials in addition to realistic practicums in the lab, will give you a complete exposure to all the necessary fundamentals of food security and allow you to experience parts of Italy you never new existed. I cannot recommend this program enough. If you are debating whether this is the program for you, trust me, it is! Solome Asseres, edition 2013, ECD/OVC internship with USAID ”
  14. 14. Food Security and Resilience • Resilience —the capacity for communities and households to prevent, mitigate and recover from disasters and crisis — is increasingly recognized as both a policy goal and key outcome of food security focused development and humanitarian programs. • Key stakeholders: FAO, Bioversity, Foundation, Slow Food Study Center Focus on drivers hampering food security and on variables enhancing resilience at different scale. Features: Gender analysis and mainstreaming in design and evaluation Understanding climate change impact on food production and mitigation experience
  15. 15. “ That course was definitely the highlight of my Tulane experience and one that I reference often. It was an incredible combination of experiential learning, collaboration, and exploration. For me, as a distance student, it was the most significant interaction I had with other colleagues and professors. Beyond that, it was great fun and went way beyond an academic experience - transforming the way I view food, local value chains, and community even today. Carole Stewart Chan, edition 2011 Asian Development Bank - Timor-Leste coordinator of Private Sector Development Initiative ”
  16. 16. Methodology and Approach • Mix of lessons, hands on lab, field visits, individual reading, students’ research, direct exchange with experienced international professionals • Formal and informal learning opportunities alternate to allow for a more holistic and permanent learning • Intense full immersion learning experience providing familiarization with a variety of broad and essential theoretical frameworks • Actual learning and practice of practical research and programming skills • Networking with key stakeholders and facilitation of internship opportunities
  17. 17. Timing and logistics • The courses are proposed in sequence and cost managed to allow and encourage for full participation to the whole didactical offer (mid May, early July) • A week break in the calendar (30 May – 7 June) allows for sightseeing around Italy and/or Europe • Classes are offered in the morning and in the afternoon (lab). Free time to complete assignments and read suggested bibliography is granted every day as well. No classes are scheduled on Saturday and Sunday, and individual travelling is also possible on the weekend. • The Italian partner organisation Punti di Vista is available for suggestions and support for optimising free time for visiting site of interest or organisations involved in the themes of the courses. • Event in the spotlight: In 2015 the international EXPO on food security will take place in North of Italy (Milan) Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life. The courses will link to the themes and actors exhibiting in the EXPO 2015, and students could consider spending some free time to attend events and sessions in Milan. • Optional activities – as movie projection, cooking lessons, excursions – are scheduled when on campus. • All costs (tuition, local transportation, lodging, food, field visits) are covered entirely for the duration of the course attended.
  18. 18. Accomodation • The campus where the Food Security Courses are hold is an ancient Franciscan Convent in rural Italy, half way between Rome and Florence. The convent has been managed for over 20 years by the CBO Punti di Vista, dedicated to sustainable and inclusive development in local and international settings, promoting ecological knowledge and initiatives, and mainstreaming gender equality. See the convent website: www.conventobolsena.org and the page on www.facebook.com/conventobolsena • When in campus the students have individual rooms, with shared bathrooms, access to all the premises including library and workstations, garden, lounge with fireplace. Internet wifi is available within the convent and in large part of the garden. • Three meals a day (breakfast, lunch and dinner) are provided during the courses, both when on campus and when travelling to field visits. • During field visits (to Rome, or Bra – Parma, or Brindisi) accommodation is in shared (max 3 persons) occasionally in single rooms.
  19. 19. Food • Fresh meals based on local seasonal and mostly organic produces are catered in campus or in nearby restaurants. • During travel for field visits, best quality/price restaurants are selected along the itinerary, and the cost of meals is included in the overall fee. • Specific dietary needs communicated in advance are kept into consideration when on campus and when on field trips.
  20. 20. Travel • Local travel is organized by taxi van, minibus, urban taxi, underground, train, according to need and availability of services. • Local travel expenses (from the airport to the airport when on course program) are all covered by the course fee. • International travel is not included in course fee.
  21. 21. Thank You! • For more information and to apply: – Go to: http://www.payson.tulane.edu/si – Send an email to paysonsummer@tulane.edu – Call 504-865-5240

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