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Emotional intelligence for personal growth

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Emotional intelligence for personal growth

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Emotional intelligence for personal growth

  1. 1. Emotional Intelligence for Personal Growth Preeti Bhaskar Assistant Professor Symbiosis Centre for Management Studies, NOIDA (Constituent of Symbiosis International University)
  2. 2. Unit-1 • The concept of Multiple Intelligence • IQ vs EQ • Nature and importance of emotional intelligence • Measuring emotional intelligence • What are emotions &Types of emotions • Physiology of Emotions • Self awareness-observing and recognizing once own feelings • Knowing relationship between thought, feelings and reactions • Assessing the frequency, Intensity and Durations of feelings • Self Acceptance and Positive Self Image-Knowing one’s strengths, weaknesses, Understanding what can be changed in self and what cannot be change • Seeing self in a positive light
  3. 3. Unit-2 • Self Management • Managing emotions: Handling Fear / Anxiety, Handling Anger, Handling Depression –Rational emotive behavior theory (thinking- feeling and reactions) • Handling stress-Stress management techniques like relaxation methods ,time management skills. • Improving personal decision making- Importance of Impulse control, examining actions and consequences, Knowing if the head or the heart is ruling a decision, Owning responsibility of the decisions and actions.
  4. 4. Unit-3 • Enhancing Interpersonal Skills • Understanding Others: Empathy, Effective communication skills • Assertiveness training- Difference between submissiveness, assertiveness and aggressiveness, Benefits of Assertiveness, Developing Assertive Behaviour Skills, Art of saying No- Assertiveness on job, interpersonal relations and everyday life. • Skills for effective conflict management
  5. 5. Unit-4 • Emotional Intelligence skills for effective team work- • Cooperation vs Competition • Conflict resolution in creative ways • Learning to arrive at win-win solution
  6. 6. Internal Evaluation (30 Marks) S.No. Component Proposed Period *exact date will be intimated Marks 1 Presentation February 1st week 10 2 Written test As per Exam department 15 3 Assignment March 1st week 5
  7. 7. Unit- 1
  8. 8. A case study of low emotional intelligence THE LAST BEER A young man had only a limited amount of beer in his fridge. His best friend came round to visit. During their conversation he told his friend not to drink his last beer. Later he found his friend had drunk it. WHAT WOULD AN EMOTIONALLY INTELLIGENT RESPONSE HAVE BEEN? • To go and buy some more maybe? • To ignore it and enjoy his friend's company? • To have a cup of coffee instead? • To go down the pub together? WHAT HAPPENED? He had low emotional intelligence and did none of these. He shot his friend dead. He is now in prison serving time for murder. His rage drove him to short-term action which produced long-term negative consequences. This is an extreme but clear example of how low emotional intelligence and a poor ability to control strong emotions in particular, can impact on a person's behaviour, work and life. Being able to control strong emotions such as rage is the seventh dimension of emotional intelligence. It is very hard to build trust without being able to control your strong emotions. If you are in business and want to be successful building trust is imperative. How good are you at controlling strong emotions?
  9. 9. TWO VIEW POINTS ABOUT EQ Traditionalists say that emotions High performers say that emotions Distract us Increase our vulnerability Cloud our judgment Inhibit free flow of data Must be controlled Motivate us Increase our confidence Speed our analysis Build trust Provide vital feedback Must be managed 9
  10. 10. 8 Basic emotions • These emotions can combine to create new emotions • e.g. Happiness + Anticipation = Excitement. • e.g Anger minus enthusiasm =depression. • Same event can give multiple emotions at the same time e.g. For a father: Happiness (of daughter marrying) + Sadness (of daughter leaving because of marriage) • Emotions are tied with physiological response e.g. churning in stomach, perspiration on face, blushing of cheeks etc. Fear anger Disgust trust Surprise anticipation Happiness sadness
  11. 11. Is EI something new? No…it has always been there…we just have been better at defining it… “That man is disciplined and happy who can prevail over the turmoil that springs from desire and anger, here on earth …” Hindu text Bhagavad-Gita, 1000 B.C.E There are TWO dimensions of emotions: Physiological side: ‘Emotion’ is a complex state of human mind, involving bodily changes of widespread character such as breathing, pounding heart, flushed face, sweating palms, pulse rate, gland secretions, etc. Psychological side, a state of excitement or perturbation marked by strong feelings. 11
  12. 12. Facial Expressions Convey Emotions
  13. 13. Variety Of Emotions • Positive human emotions • Negative human emotions
  14. 14. Positive Emotions • Positive emotions that lead one to feel good about one’s self will lead to an emotionally happy and satisfied result.
  15. 15. Positive Emotions Some of the positive emotions are • Hopeful • Confident • Peaceful
  16. 16. Negative Emotions • Negative emotions sap your energy and undermine your effectiveness. In the negative emotional state, you find the lack of desire to do anything.
  17. 17. Negative Emotions Some of the negative emotions are • Exhausted • Panic • Obnoxious(unpleasant)
  18. 18. FACTORS AFFECTING EMOTIONS
  19. 19. •PERSONALITY •CULTURE
  20. 20. •WEATHER •STRESS
  21. 21. •AGE •GENDER
  22. 22. •ENVIRONMENTAL •MARITAL RELATION
  23. 23. •ORGANIZATIONAL •SOCIAL
  24. 24. Howard Gardner's Multiple Intelligences The theory of multiple intelligences challenges the idea of a single IQ, where human beings have one central "computer" where intelligence is housed. Howard Gardner, the Harvard professor who originally proposed the theory, says that there are multiple types of human intelligence, each representing different ways of processing information: http://www.niu.edu/facdev/_pdf/guide/learning/howard_gardner_theory_multiple_intelligences.pdf
  25. 25. Howard Gardner's multiple intelligences theory Intelligence type capability and perception Linguistic words and language Logical-Mathematical logic and numbers Musical music, sound, rhythm Bodily-Kinesthetic body movement control Spatial-Visual images and space Interpersonal other people's feelings Intrapersonal self-awareness
  26. 26. Howard Gardner's Eight Intelligences • Verbal-linguistic intelligence refers to an individual's ability to analyze information and produce work that involves oral and written language, such as speeches, books, and emails. • Logical-mathematical intelligence describes the ability to develop equations and proofs, make calculations, and solve abstract problems. • Visual-spatial intelligence allows people to comprehend maps and other types of graphical information. • Musical intelligence enables individuals to produce and make meaning of different types of sound. • Naturalistic intelligence refers to the ability to identify and distinguish among different types of plants, animals, and weather formations found in the natural world. • Bodily-kinesthetic intelligence entails using one's own body to create products or solve problems. • Interpersonal intelligence reflects an ability to recognize and understand other people's moods, desires, motivations, and intentions. • Intrapersonal intelligence refers to people's ability to recognize and assess those same characteristics within themselves.
  27. 27. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE The psychologists Salovey and Mayer originally coined the term 'emotional intelligence' in 1990. However, Daniel Goleman popularized it in 1995 in the title of his bestselling book, Emotional Intelligence: Why it can Matter More than IQ .
  28. 28. You will learn: • Understand the emotional intelligence model and its core competencies • Discover the benefits of emotional intelligence for yourself, your team, and organization • Identify strategies and opportunities to apply emotional intelligence in your role • Choose perceptions and behaviors that will lead to positive outcomes.
  29. 29. The work of the Consortium for Research on Emotional Intelligence (EI) in Organizations has identified five key research studies that support the importance of an individual's emotional and social skills as important for success at work.
  30. 30. Study 1 – Experienced partners in a multinational consulting firm were assessed on the EI competencies plus three others (Boyatzis, 1999). Findings: • Partners who scored above the median on nine or more of the 20 competencies delivered $1.2 million more profit from their accounts than did other partners. • 139% incremental gain. Study 2 – An analysis of more than 300 top-level executives from 15 global companies showed that six emotional competencies distinguished stars from the average (Spencer, 1997). Findings: • Distinguishing Emotional Competencies: o Influence o Team Leadership o Organizational Awareness, Self-confidence, o Achievement Drive o and Leadership
  31. 31. Study 3 – looked into the productivity of 'top performers' in jobs of medium complexity (e.g. sales clerks, mechanics) and the most complex jobs (e.g. insurance salespeople, account managers) (Hunter, Schmidt, & Judiesch, 1990). Findings: • Top performers in medium complexity jobs were: o 12 times more productive than those at the bottom. o 85% more productive than an average performer. • Top performers in the most complex jobs were: o 127% more productive than an average performer . Competency research in over 200 companies and organizations worldwide into top performers suggests that (Goleman, 1998): • one-third of this difference is due to technical skill and cognitive ability. • two-thirds is due to emotional competence • In top leadership positions, over four-fifths of the difference is due to emotional competence.
  32. 32. Study 5 - in a national insurance company research showed the difference in policy premium sold (Hay/McBer Research and Innovation Group, 1997). Findings: • Insurance sales agents who were weak in emotional competencies (i.e. self-confidence, initiative, and empathy) sold policies with an average premium of $54,000. • Insurance sales agents who were very strong in at least five of eight key emotional competencies sold policies worth $114,000. - Study 4 - At L'Oreal, research (Spencer & Spencer, 1993; Spencer, McClelland & Kelner, 1997) showed that sales agents selected on the basis of certain emotional competencies significantly outsold salespeople selected using the company's old selection procedure. Findings: • On an annual basis, salespeople selected on the basis of emotional competence sold $91,370 more than other salespeople did, for a net revenue increase of $2,558,360. • Salespeople selected on the basis of emotional competence also had 63% less turnover during the first year than those selected in the typical way.

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