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Meeting the Changing Research Needs of Students. An ebook survey on China students.

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The presentation summarizes the survey results from 4,755 respondents from over 80 member institutions, which was co-hosted by ProQuest and CALIS (China Academic Library & Information System.

The survey covered the following areas: overall awareness of the electronic resources at their university; ebooks user behavior; usage of ebook resources; challenges for using ebooks; ebook features; whether training was important in using information resources for their learning and their research; ebooks trends and needs in North America.

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Meeting the Changing Research Needs of Students. An ebook survey on China students.

  1. 1. Meeting the Changing Research Needs of Students An eBook Survey on China Students Conita Leung Digital Publishing Director ProQuest
  2. 2. Research Methodology • Thank you - CALIS, all librarians & students assisting the study • Quantitative electronic survey hosted by CALIS • Over 80 member institutions participated • Number of Respondents: 4,755 • Survey Period: April 2 – 20, 2012 2
  3. 3. Demographic Breakdown of Respondents 3 Undergrad (79%) Graduate (20%) Faculty 1%
  4. 4. How would you describe your level of awareness of electronic resources at your university library? 8% 27% 60% 5% Excellent (8%) Good (27%) Fair (60%) Poor (5%)
  5. 5. Does your library have eBooks (electronic books)? Yes (87%) No (3%) Not Sure (10%) 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 4500
  6. 6. How often do you use eBooks that your library provides? (per week) 8% 14% 29%27% 22% More than 10 hours (8%) 5 - 10 hours (14%) 1 - 5 hours (29%) Less than 1 hour (27%)
  7. 7. Reasons for not using eBook 0 500 1000 1500 My instructor requested I do not use e-… I do not trust e-books. They are not a… There's no e-resource in my university… I do not have access to a computer… E-books are not available in subject areas… E-books are too difficult to access remotely E-books are too difficult to use 27 97 148 157 203 496 1310
  8. 8. Frequency of using different resources 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 Academic Use Personal Use
  9. 9. How do you determine if a source of information is trustworthy? 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 I do not worry about the source If it's available in print If it's available through Google or… If my peers recommend it If it's from a well-known publisher If it's available through my library or the… If my instructor recommends it 106 1450 1514 1908 3041 3300 3710
  10. 10. When you have the option of using either the electronic or print version of a book, how often do you opt to use the electronic version? 14% 33% 42% 10% 1% Very often (14%) Often (33%) Sometimes (42%) Rarely (10%) Never (1%)
  11. 11. Please indicate if the following statements are true for eBooks, print books or both 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Good for cover-to-cover reading There is a wide selection of titles in my program of study Ability to take notes Easy to read Clear graphics and images Easy to browse Easy to organize Easy to use Easy to print or photocopy Anytime, anywhere access Ability to highlight Easy to search and find information Information is current Easy to cite Good for quick reference Easy to store Easy to use mutlply files at once Easy to share Environmentally friendly Applies to E-resources Applies to Paper Resources Applis to both Not Sure
  12. 12. How important are the following features to eBooks? 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Shared bookshelves Book reviews Collaborative tools Ability to email text Personal bookshelves Multimedia Ability for more than one student to use an e-book at… Automatic citations Printing Highlighting Zoom and scale Annotating Off-campus access Anytime access Copying and pasting Downloading to hand held device Downloading to laptop/desktop Searching Very Important Important Unimportant
  13. 13. In what circumstances would you prefer to use ebook for your study? 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 Better training and instruction More current titles Multimedia capabilities PDA accessibility Less restrictions on printing and copying Better e-book reader More titles available in my subject 1627 1769 1851 2148 2181 2471 3064
  14. 14. How do you usually find and access eBooks (i.e. what is your starting point)? 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 Course management systems Vendor or publisher website Library catalog Library website Search engines 878 1078 1950 2890 3064
  15. 15. How did you learn about eBooks? 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 Training sessions Email notifications from the library Department web pages Posters and other promotional materials Library orientations Librarians Library website or blog Library catalog Instructors Peers Google or other search engines 472 642 755 1047 1181 1290 1833 1895 1989 2412 2766
  16. 16. How important is instruction or training in finding and using information resources to your research and learning? Very Important (45%) Somewhat Important (48%) Not Important (7%)
  17. 17. What do you think are the most effective support and training tools for learning how to find and use eBooks? 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 Online chat Training videos In-person instruction Online help pages Paper guides (i.e. user guides) Online tutorials 574 1620 1744 2232 2424 2451
  18. 18. Benefits of using ebooks: 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Not sure since I have not used ebooks often Interactive/ multimedia materials make the content… It is less expensive than print book Accessible when there is internet connection Convenient to search within an ebook Accessible on mobile device Don't have to carry around heavy print books Librarian Faculty Student
  19. 19. Disadvantages of using ebooks: 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Devices are too expensive Not enough digital materials Difficult to search for ditigal materials Less convenient to use Less convenient to take notes and annotations Librarian Faculty Student
  20. 20. Disadvantages of using ebooks: “Less convenient to use”
  21. 21. For books: 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% I recommend open educational resources and adopted ebook I expect to use ebooks instead of printed books within the next two years I prefer to use ebooks rather than printed books Librarian Faculty Student v s
  22. 22. E-book Adoption E-books are rapidly becoming mainstream Fastest growing sector of the publishing industry Between 2002 – 2009 e-book sales had a CAGR of 71%*1 94% of academic libraries have e-books2 23% of academic libraries increased e-book spending in 20103 1 Association of American Publisher, 2. Library Journal/School Library Journal,3. Funding and Priorities: The Library Resource Guide Benchmark Study on 2011 Library Spending Plans, Unisphere Research, 2011
  23. 23. Industry Trends and Needs Academic libraries are expected to increase e-book spending by 150% in 5 years to:1 Meet patrons’ growing demand Support distance learning Reduce costs (shelving, circulation, management, storage) Increase discoverability and usage Provide anytime/anywhere access and greater portability Offer greater utility (research tools and functionality) “The dramatic increase in online classes, both 75% and fully online, has created a great demand for e-books and other electronic resources.” Shelby Anfenson-Comeau, Reference Librarian, Louisiana State University Eunice ** Library Journal/School Library Journal’s “(ebrary has) allowed us to increase our collection size without increasing our physical resources. It has also allowed us to bring the library's 'collection' to where the user is.” Patricia Sutherland, Library Manager, College of the North Atlantic – Qatar
  24. 24. Usage ebrary’s usage continues to increase by more than 30%, year-over-year Usage by Region 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Millions Searches Prints Copies Views 0 50 100 150 200 250 Millions Middle East andAfrica Latin America Asia Pacific Europe North America
  25. 25. Publishers ebrary publishers include most UPs and YBP top approval publishers (partial list) • ABC-CLIO • Academic Press • Amsterdam University Press • Artech House • Ashgate Publishing • Basic Books • Berg Publishers • Berghahn Books • Bernan Press • Boydell & Brewer • Brill Academic Publishers • Brookings Institution Press • Cambridge University Press • Columbia University Press • Consortium Book Sales • Continuum International Publishing Group • Cornell University Press • CQ Press • CRC Press • Duke University Press • Edinburgh University Press • Edward Elgar Publishing • Elsevier • Elsevier Health Sciences • Emerald Group • Facts on File • Georgetown University Press • Greenwood/Praeger • Guilford Press • Harvard University Press • Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing • Human Kinetics • IGI Global • Independent Publishing Group (IPG) • Indiana University Press • Informa Healthcare • Island Press • Information Age • Jessica Kingsley Publishing • John Benjamins • Johns Hopkins University Press • Johns and Bartlett Publishers • M.E. Sharpe • McFarland & Company • McGill-Queens University Press • McGraw-Hill Book Companies • MIT Press • National Academies Press • National Book Network • The New Press • NYU Press • Ohio University Press • Oxford University Press • Palgrave Macmillan • Penn State University Press • Peter Lang Publishing • Perseus Book Group • Pickering & Chatto • Princeton University Press • RAND Corporation • Rodopi Editions • Routledge • Rowman and Littlefield • Rutgers University Press • SAGE Publications • Springer • Stanford University Press • Taylor & Francis • Temple University Press • Transaction • United Nations Publications • University of Arizona Press • University of California Press • University of British Columbia Press • University of Chicago Press • University of Georgia Press • University of Hawaii Press • University of Michigan Press • University of Minnesota Press • University of Nebraska Press • University of North Carolina Press • University of Pennsylvannia Press • University of Toronto Press • University of Virginia Press • University of Washington Press • University Press of Florida • University Press of Kentucky • University Press of Mississippi • University Press of New England • University of Texas Press • Walter de Gruyter • Wiley - Blackwell • World Bank Publications • World Scientific • Yale University Press “ebrary offers an excellent selection of academic publishers, as well as a good array of multidisciplinary topics.” Anali Perry, Collections & Scholarly Communications Librarian, Arizona State University
  26. 26. In Summary: Unique Academic Complete Advantages Critical Mass of Content: 113K+ quality titles in 16 subjects from a diverse range of renowned publishers—with unlimited access for all patrons, all the time Workflow advantages: Patron analytics, collection development tools, indexing in ProQuest Summon for discoverability, D.A.S.H data sharing fast; and a redesigned LibCentral User experience enhancements: A new, intuitive reader coming in Summer 2014 to guide the research workflow and facilitate outcomes Quality: The most unique CHOICE Outstanding Academic Titles, DOODYS Core Titles, University Press partners—plus new & noteworthy publisher partners in 2014 Flexible Models: No hosting fees, special consortia pricing, and new programs & partnerships to maximize your budget for subscription + complementary content
  27. 27. ebrary and EBL: ebook pioneers providing the largest selection under the most flexible models and workflow • 500K+ scholarly titles in all subjects • 400K+ eligible for DDA • 600+ publishers • Subscription, Demand-driven Acquisition, Perpetual Archive, Consortia models • Unlimited user, three-user, single user, Non-Linear™ Lending, Extended Access™ • Online and offline access with dedicated apps • Integration with your vendors • Detailed usage statistics • Titles Matching Fast (TMF) Why Choose ProQuest?

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