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  1. 1. A move towards a capacity to Live the questions, and view identity, place, placelessness, blonging from new& unique perspectives “Homeland is not an eternal value but a function of a specific technology; still, whoever loses it suffer. I fell into the error of confusing my private self with the outside world. It was only after I realized, painfully, that these now severed attachments had bound me that I was overcome by that strange dizziness of liberation and freedom, which everywhere characterizes the free spirit …All of us nomads who have emerged from it share in the collapse of settledness.” {Flusser, The Challenge of the Migrant}
  2. 2. Connecting Dots Across Disciplines= thinking up New Combinations & Cross-Pollination of Ideas “in order for us to truly create and contribute to the world, we have to be able to connect countless dots, to cross-pollinate ideas from a wealth of disciplines, to combine and recombine these pieces and build new castles.” {maria popova}
  3. 3. Networked Knowledge Combinational Creativity Cross-Pollination Exchange & Sharing
  4. 4. Moving beyond the norm
  5. 5. Global vs local
  6. 6. How we we Connect With increasingly complex global community while still retaining sense of self as individual ı
  7. 7. “I view locality as primarily relational and contextual rather than scalar or spatial.  I see it as a complex phenomenological quality, constituted by a series of links between the sense of social immediacy, the technologies of interactivity, and the relativity of contexts” ( Arjun Appadurai, Modernity at Large, 1996, p. 178)
  8. 8.         Descriptions vs Immersions A typewriter is a means of transcribing thought, not expressing it.ı {Marhsall McLuhan}ı  
  9. 9. Identity crises– using online life as kind of platform, play with identity in a kind of extended ‘identity creation workshop’. BUT… If virtual self is idealised or aspired self, then we can lose track of the ‘self self’ ie the real self, or who we were before the other selves took precedence….
  10. 10. CLUTTER. Of visual content Sheer volume, Response Fun!
  11. 11. “black & white Flat Static Odorless- Far removed from any reality that they knew” {Anthropologist edmund carpenter 1950s}
  12. 12. “Beyond the age of information is the age of choices.” {designer charles eames in 1971} Omni-connectivity, consumers being always on, does bring about the opportunity of contextual content based on behaviour, time and location.ı
  13. 13. Surprising new depths of connection Enchantment intimacy / almost spiritual state What james Joyce called ESTHETIC ARREST A State in which the “mind is arrested & raised above desire and loathing” “the luminous silent stasis of esthetic pleasure” Or what the Italian physiologist Luigi Galvani called “the enchantment of the heart.” This has been called ‘deep & loose’ connection . YouTubers can feel free to create or experience deep relationships because they are loose, and they may choose to keep them loose precisely because they are deep.
  14. 14. Real Life {not abstraction}
  15. 15. Pain U&A Nigeria_Feb 2014
  16. 16. Pain U&A Nigeria_Feb 2014
  17. 17. But there is also the potential for creativity in our digital days; making the technological into a malleable product of creative expression “to understand a social media profile,   think clothing meets bedroom wall. Having a "cool" layout can be just as important as wearing the right fashion label. Profiles are meant to show one's tastes, values, and identity.” Danah boyd, digital anthropologist “Profiles are a way for to represent who they are to their larger peer group. Their choice in what to put up there is a form of digital fashion. While we are accustomed to accessorizing our bodies when we go out in public, there are no bodies online. We have to write ourselves into being, & use various techniques for expressing ourselves.”
  18. 18. Combinations, compilations, connections
  19. 19. Si mp leGrowing , the things that have nostaliga for simpler past pre-digital authentic xxx “Apps this good, who’s got time to make friends?” ~ Macklemore & Ryan Lewis
  20. 20. “Sharing the world’s first visual language., global library of icons Aims to “simplify communication” on global scale “across borders” . Translates concepts into symbols Synolising convepts into visuals. Visuals transcend the limitations of language barriers- put to good use in community to help those unable to read find food banks, locate recyclingservices ,etc The noun project crowd sourced “iconathon”
  21. 21. Pain  U&A  Nigeria_Feb  2014   Sense of connection Fits in with wider postindustrial changes in societies – increased longing for community & connection whilst preserving sense of individualism & independence. =Connection without constraint
  22. 22. Co nn ect ion s
  23. 23. New Ways to explore & new places to go, going Off the Beaten Path
  24. 24. Growing , the things that have nostaliga for connections past pre- digital authentic New ways of knowing New ways of exploring The unknown
  25. 25. Art blog jogging- anaonymous posting of art jpegs, only pushed off mian page when other entries come along. It’s an ephemeral amnesiac data flow, one that swaps the art world’s market-driven frenzy for networked global visibility. Democratic creativity “a ceaseless & restless stream of information”
  26. 26. Slowing Down
  27. 27. “To derive one's happiness from only specific moments in time is to miss out on the cosmic accident that is all of life's moments."ı - Wayne Coyne of The Flaming Lips      
  28. 28. Alternative record of time as personal, individual, subjective, time Asynchronous, flexible constantly renegotiated •  What constitutes time? What constitutes time in past, present, future? •  Collective vs personalized time •  Time as malleable – compress vs stretch time •  Quantified vs subjective time •  Reconfiguring notions of time-space
  29. 29. iSOP: in search of personal time {“an attempt to live unreal time in a real-time world” “We are building personal timekeepers and new measurements for moments based on individual perception of time. In this artistic endeavor to questions the global synchronization and the universal standard, we hope to facilitate a multitude of flows of time.” In changing how we formalize time, one could stretch the present or – perhaps unfathomably – compress it. "Now," then, becomes a malleable space in which one can reorient the relationship between memory, action, and possible futures.
  30. 30. Criticised the linear notion of time, as fixed, homogenous, unchannging, operaitng like assembly line- our calls, eating, sleeping habits all work wthin this and we rely on this to define ‘order’ and provide structure, reason, and purpose to our lives. “absolute time” “popular perceptions of time have often been based in the idea that it is a fixed medium in which events take place, rather than a dynamic contributing factor” “global synchronisation” “we live in an era where the contmeporary world oeprates in terms of global synchronisation. Things happen in real time and this semblance of simultaneity, is a defining characteristc of value and synonmy of efficiency.” human experience as it is quantified gains currency at the expense of human experience as it is felt.
  31. 31. Reflect personal perception of time rathern than counting the 86,400 seconds in a day. built microcomputer encassed in wood & handed a dozen out to particants in la – got them to estimate what 1 miute was and ‘set’ each clock to that individiual’s own perception Disrupting Time “it was like we were floating somewhere else but not really belonging anywhere” Taeyoon Choi and E Roon Kang disrupted/ ditchstandard time in favor of a made-up alternative called "elsewhen." This imaginary time zone would measure each passing minute not by the rotation of the earth but by a person's perception of how much time has gone by. 
  32. 32. And meanwhile time goes about its immemorial work of making everyone look and feel like shit."  “as soon as I pressed the button it made me more attentive to what I was experiencing and observing in that moment." Encouraged more self-relexion & mindfullness/ engagement on time as intangible and difficult to contain, hold, own. Instead, owning a sense of time encouraged them to live in the moment It also made the participants realise that time is necessary to function in today's world. But that doesn't mean you need to be synchronous with everyone all the time.
  33. 33. Change from ‘Red Bull to Raw Energy Balls’ #slow living {}
  34. 34. A move towards a capacity to Live the questions, and view identity, place, placelessness, blonging from new& unique perspectives “Homeland is not an eternal value but a function of a specific technology; still, whoever loses it suffer. I fell into the error of confusing my private self with the outside world. It was only after I realized, painfully, that these now severed attachments had bound me that I was overcome by that strange dizziness of liberation and freedom, which everywhere characterizes the free spirit …All of us nomads who have emerged from it share in the collapse of settledness.” {Flusser, The Challenge of the Migrant}
  35. 35. sha ring   economy
  36. 36. fffı “I view locality as primarily relational and contextual rather than scalar or spatial.  I see it as a complex phenomenological quality, constituted by a series of links between the sense of social immediacy, the technologies of interactivity, and the relativity of contexts” ( Arjun Appadurai, Modernity at Large, 1996, p. 178) Global Vs. Local.
  37. 37. D.I. WHY ?  
  38. 38. DIY & CRAFTING SHIFT FROM EXPRESSIONS OF INDIVIDUAL INTEREST/ SEARCH FOR STATUS OBJECTS/ OBJECTIS OF CONSPICUOUS CONSUMPTION VALUE NEW VALUE EXCHANGE – VALUE ON PROCESS & shared social interest NOT individual end PRODUCT PINTEREST- ‘INDIVIDIDUAL’ INTERESTS/ PINS, BUT PINNED TOGETHER ON ONE MASSIVE GLOBAL MOOD BOARD- STRANDS OF CONNECTION THROUGH SHARED INTERESTS Massive Growth: Pinterest from 5000 to over 70million users in just 5 years.
  39. 39. Growth in the DIY movement “Steven Chu, an art director who goes by the name Chuubie, set up a make-your-own-monster station. It could live on one of four worlds: Courage, Lurve, Magik, or Adaptability.” organizing events for grown-ups that ask them to abandon their cynicism and see the world through the eyes of a child- carefree joy & blissful curiosity “In one of the bedrooms, three women constructed magic wands out of pencils, pipe cleaners, stickers, and ribbon.” “cupcake’s crown boutique…like a bespoke tailor with a glue gun, glitter, and clothespins…everyone’s was unique.”
  40. 40. “The freedom all to be lords of or tiny skull-sized kingdoms, alone at the centre of all creation. …. The really important kind of freedom involves attention and awareness and discipline, and being able truly to care about other people and to sacrifice for them over and over in myriad petty, unsexy ways every day.. That is real freedom. That is being educated, and understanding how to think. The alternative is unconsciousness, the default setting, the rat race, the constant gnawing sense of having had, and lost, some infinite thing..” {David Foster Wallace}
  41. 41.         Adult Camp: Digital Detox,and Pre- School masterclass, a weekly class playing with glitter glue and having naptime Peter Pan market sss Pervasive interest for childhood
  42. 42. #summer camp fun ‘I went to adult summer camp and it was like a frat party on Steriods’ “what makes it so special is the community. So intangible you have to experience it yourself.” More than 1million adults go to camp each year, looking to relive their childhood memories or experience a summertime tradition for the first time. “Others are themed, Young Pros, where 20- to 30-year-olds can network outdoors, and J-Weekend for Jewish professionals. I opt for the Sports, Fun, & Adventure two-and-a-half-day retreat, which costs about $560 after tax”
  43. 43. Month long course, cost between 333-$999 ‘art supplies, snacks, & class trips’ expenses not included. “When I arrived, a tall bearded man dressed in drag greeted me and introduced himself as Cupcake, a recently graduated master's student of queer theory and visual culture. He asked me what I was called as a kid, and made me a name tag that read "Mimi." Some students created abstract art with fingerpaint while others molded Play-Doh into castles and sea creatures.
  44. 44. “Steven Chu, an art director who goes by the name Chuubie, set up a make-your-own-monster station. It could live on one of four worlds: Courage, Lurve, Magik, or Adaptability”.
  45. 45. “Stories are the way we live. They are what our friends tell us, in their pain and joy, their passion and rage, their yearning and their cry against injustice.” {Andre Dubas}
  46. 46. Getting crafty
  47. 47. Current Craze for Adult Colouring In Books A major new industry & cultural shiftı Trend seems to transcend age, gender, geographyı Infantilizing? Escapist? Meditative? Connecting? French publisher Hachette Pratique’s “Art-thérapie: 100 coloriages antistress have sold more than 3.4million copies since 2012.   “An escape to the world of inspiration & fulfilment”
  48. 48. “Instead of just creating one piece and putting it on a gallery wall, each piece gets a life that’s far more extensive and far more lasting. The idea that I’m presenting these drawings to people all over the planet and asking them to finish the drawing with their own color, to me that’s incredibly exciting.” Steve McDonald ‘Invisible cities’ books’
  49. 49. “I went to 'preschool for adults' and it was kind of like Burning Man (minus all the drugs and sand)” {A month long program aimed to ‘connect nyers with their inner child’}
  50. 50. #summer camp fun ‘I went to adult summer camp and it was like a frat party on Steriods’ “what makes it so special is the community. So intangible you have to experience it yourself.” More than 1million adults go to camp each year, looking to relive their childhood memories or experience a summertime tradition for the first time. Others are themed, Young Pros, where 20- to 30-year-olds can network outdoors, and J-Weekend for Jewish professionals. I opt for the Sports, Fun, & Adventure two-and-a-half-day retreat, which costs about $560 after tax
  51. 51. Month long course, cost between 333-$999 ‘art supplies, snacks, & class trips’ expenses not included. Some students created abstract art with fingerpaint while others molded Play-Doh into castles and sea creatures. Steven Chu, an art director who goes by the name Chuubie, set up a make-your-own-monster station. It could live on one of four worlds: Courage, Lurve, Magik, or Adaptability.
  52. 52. What does it all mean???
  53. 53. Surprisingly popularity of #Adult Summer Camps Inner child gets crafty
  54. 54. “When I arrived, a tall bearded man dressed in drag greeted me and introduced himself as Cupcake, a recently graduated master's student of queer theory and visual culture. He asked me what I was called as a kid, and made me a name tag that read "Mimi.””
  55. 55. “When I arrived, a tall bearded man dressed in drag greeted me and introduced himself as Cupcake, a recently graduated master's student of queer theory and visual culture. He asked me what I was called as a kid, and made me a name tag that read "Mimi.””
  56. 56. “Stories are the way we live. They are what our friends tell us, in their pain and joy, their passion and rage, their yearning and their cry against injustice.” {Andre Dubas}
  57. 57. Part of the Appeal is the tactile nature .“eople are really excited to do something analog and creative, at a time when we’re all so overwhelmed by screens and the Internet,” she said.“And coloring is not as scary as a blank sheet of paper or canvas. It’s a great way to de-stress “ {johanna basford, global best seller, secret garden started the craze, since relase of book in 2013, sold more than 2mil copies in 22 countries, and for a while was 1st- and follow up 2nd- on the nyt book list}ı New & notable leaf:; Chinese graphic book {without words} in middle of metropolis, Finding captivating Leaf in otherwise grey industrial world The
  58. 58. Ideas as social currency We can still ‘make sense’ of a visual image and make it complete/ tie the fragments into a cohesive comprehension
  59. 59. Ideas Industry: intellectual revolution “The only thing that kept me from going crazy was immersion in the world of ideas,” was the only place you could come to where you could hear people from all these different disciplines and understand what they were saying. [I told them how] inspiring that was, and how important that was." EG Ted’s ‘ideas worth spreading’- operates in 3000 cities, lectures viewed more than 2.5billion times SUDDENLY COOL TO BE INTO THE THINGS THAT PREVIOUSLY WERE ‘NERDY’ “cupcake’s crown boutique…like a bespoke tailor with a glue gun, glitter, and clothespins…everyone’s was unique.”
  60. 60. Ideas are now more important than processes More-than-human-Lab: Combines creative research methods, science and technology studies, multispecies ethnography, and more-than-human geography to explore different ways of being in, with, and for the world
  61. 61. New Ways of Thinking, Making, & Doing for the human world by taking inspiration form the non-human world More-than-human-Lab: Combines creative research methods, science and technology studies, multispecies ethnography, and more-than-human geography to explore different ways of being in, with, and for the world Have you ever wondered what design research could be if it wasn’t focused on products or people? What would you do if your collaborators were animals, vegetables or minerals? 
  62. 62. More than Human Multi-Species Ethnography “Maybe it’s animalness that will make the world right again: the wisdom of elephants, the enthusiasm of canines, the grace of snakes, the mildness of anteaters. Perhaps being human needs some diluting.” — Carol Emshwiller, New creative research technologies & empirically-grounded models -  Reimagining technology and design A fundamental shift grounded on interconnectedness and interdependence of humans and more-than-humans: animals and plants; land, water and air; materials, processes and artefactss -  Creative ethnography that demolishes boundary between nature & culture
  63. 63. Designing ideas for interspecies communication & connection “animals enrich our ignorance” — donnah harrahway , when species meet I approach hardware, code and algorithms as non-human actors that are capable of having agency and expressing subjectivity, similar to worker bees in hive or a flock of pigeons. My research involves designing protocols for a network capable of connecting human and non-human nodes equally, and enabling forms of inter-species communication and interaction.” Looking at people and technology and design and everyday life with — and through — animals
  64. 64. More than Human Multi-Species Ethnography “Maybe it’s animalness that will make the world right again: the wisdom of elephants, the enthusiasm of canines, the grace of snakes, the mildness of anteaters. Perhaps being human needs some diluting.” — Carol Emshwiller, . THE internet of Things promises to connect billions of objects to the Internet, and this project imagines possible futures where NZ Merino sheep become part of this network. Combining ethnographic fieldwork and speculative design, multiple scenarios for the production and consumption of NZ Merino were created and public responses to them assessed. The results highlight the cultural, political and ethical stakes when animals join the Internet of Things
  65. 65. New forms of “sensory ethnography” e.G networking of bees, pigs in cyberspace “My project explores public concerns about animal agriculture and will work with Wairarapa-based Longbush Pork to conduct a case study of their social media use, and co-design videos for public exhibition and engagement.” I approach hardware, code and algorithms as non-human actors that are capable of having agency and expressing subjectivity, similar to worker bees in hive or a flock of pigeons. My research involves designing protocols for a network capable of connecting human and non-human nodes equally, and enabling forms of inter-species communication and interaction.”
  66. 66. Since 2005, strangers have been drawing, painting, collaging their inner most secrets and sending them Anonymously to Frank Warren’s post secret project
  67. 67. A remarkable story in collective compassion Charting in Visceral detail, what it means to be human “Secrets can take many forms. They can be shocking or silly or soulful. They can connect us with our deepest humanity, or with people we’ll never meet.”
  68. 68. w o rk for love/ Ann ual Ra ce 7 GOING SLOW
  69. 69.        Challenging perceptions of space , & distance Liberating ideas Concepts Thoughts From static to 3d lived space Realities and using these creations to ‘build’ cultures
  70. 70. Call for more self-aware relationship with our digital lives = reflected in growing trend for ‘mindful’ living/ authentic forms of connection to ourselves & to others.
  71. 71. Exmpahsis on Lived experiences & active participation Experiencing the world through the ‘haptic’– through touch, not just through the skin, but touching it through other senses-‘touching with our eyes, our gaze, our sense of smell and “touching it with your mind” “we can never really touch the present because as soon as it is here, it is gone” {Brazilian artist, Ernesto Neto} mixing the sensorial with the cerebral alongside scale variations from the miniscule to the vast,
  72. 72. Collective experiences = Response to Paradox of choice & information overload= ‘back to basics’ crafting, cooking, living Tangible Reasonable Predictable pace- something rarely seen in digital life
  73. 73. Response to Paradox of choice & information overload= ‘back to basics’ crafting, cooking, living Tangible Reasonable Predictable pace- something rarely seen in digital life
  74. 74. Looking for deeper layers of reality One day it will have to be officially admitted that what we have christened reality is an even greater illusion than the world of dreams.” {Salvador Dali}ı
  75. 75. The growth of going slow -Seeking out conscious fulfilment –food, leisure activities, methods of social interaction, -Change of mindset -Emphasis on community outreach/connection -Slow Living, mindul not nonchalent PWC estimate 5 main sharing economies will be worth ı
  76. 76. •  Airbnb •  Lyft •  Uber •  Taskrabbit Sharing Economy: disrupters for a new economy Underscored by transactional relationships, the Sharing economy works on supply&demand basis. It depends on someone with excess product/service/capacity to offer that to others in need of it- e.g. a spare room {airbnb} or a few hours use of a portable drill {taskrabbit}
  77. 77. •  -Slow Food Movementı •  Knittingı •  Sourdough bread…ı Slowing down SHariNG ECoNoMY/ “understanding the pleasures of knitting or weeding or making pickles might articulate the value of that world outside electronic chatter and distraction, and inside a more stately sense of time” {rEBECCA sOLNIT} SLOWING DOWN TO REGAIN CONTACT, COMMUNICATION. SLOW = AUTENTIC= BETTER RELATIONSHIP WITH PRODUCTS AND PEOPLE
  78. 78. 6% Britons now participating in it {Uber, Airbnb and Etsy) in order to supplement their income. = 2million people & can make substantial sums- 1 in 5 of those people, around 400,000 people – are earning more than £500 a week {According to Intuit’s research}. And 3% – around 60,000 people – say they’re making more than £78,000 a year. Etsy, the marketplace for handmade goods, is the most popular sharing economy platform with Britons, followed by the ride-share app Uber, and the peer-to-peer lending service Zopa. h
  79. 79. A move towards a capacity to Live the questions, and view identity, place, placelessness, blonging from new& unique perspectives “Homeland is not an eternal value but a function of a specific technology; still, whoever loses it suffer. I fell into the error of confusing my private self with the outside world. It was only after I realized, painfully, that these now severed attachments had bound me that I was overcome by that strange dizziness of liberation and freedom, which everywhere characterizes the free spirit …All of us nomads who have emerged from it share in the collapse of settledness.” {Flusser, The Challenge of the Migrant}
  80. 80. Ideas as social currency We can still ‘make sense’ of a visual image and make it complete/ tie the fragments into a cohesive comprehension
  81. 81. Human communication is ‘intersubjective’ stories form a bridge between groups… human communication cannot be reduced to information. The message not only involves, it is, a relationship between speaker and hearer. The medium in which the message is embedded is immensely complex, infinitely more than a code: it is a language, a function of a society, a culture, in which the language, the speaker, and the hearer are all embedded Live, face-to-face human communication is not mechanical, and machine-mediated, but interactive. It is also active, continuous, and mutual- an interchange between paritesIntersubjectivity is mutual. “it is a continuous intersubjectivity that goes both ways all the time”
  82. 82. “I don’t trust theories I only trust alongisde others in their moments of experiences {mattjackson kauffman} Experience new currency of trust
  83. 83. Creating Conversations through #Hashtags {named children’s favourite word of the year in 2015}
  84. 84. New voices connecting across difference. ‘coming out on facebook: 800 000 changed gender to gender neutral/custom Amount of people coming out ‘on facebook’ – using the social media as communicative platform is x3 than j 26million changed profile picture to rainbow filter Of those ‘out’ on facebook, 78% changed profile information to reflect this in years followings 2012 5.7mil americans fans of 300 most popular lgbt pages on facebook {fans increased 25%
  85. 85. & Adapting the narrative cross- culturally .
  86. 86. E.G. Redesigning google delivering the right content in the right space for the right people “We look forward to seeing how today’s changes help kick-start even more conversations around everything from Zombie Cats to Vintage Calculators” Google Community & Connections: content channels to target specific demographics
  87. 87. Unilever teaming up with Vice: content channels to target specific demographics “A different way of working, recognizing this is an audience that engages with content in a different way.” unilever   New ways of working: delivering content relevant to audience & appropriate for brand
  88. 88. Pinterst delivering the right content in the right space for the right people “We look forward to seeing how today’s changes help kick-start even more conversations around everything from Zombie Cats to Vintage Calculators” Google Community & Connections: content channels to target specific demographics
  89. 89. “We have been awash in a steadily increasing tide of information for the past century….a total reconfiguration of information itself”
  90. 90. Combinations, compilations, connections
  91. 91. New Ways to explore & new places to go, going Off the Beaten Path
  92. 92. Democracy of information means new forms of value: participation & wider #access •  Passive audience replaced by active. Participation expected & DESIRED Co-Creation, Peer Production Convergence Culture
  93. 93. “Sharing the world’s first visual language., global library of icons Aims to “simplify communication” on global scale “across borders” . Translates concepts into symbols Synolising convepts into visuals. Visuals transcend the limitations of language barriers- put to good use in community to help those unable to read find food banks, locate recyclingservices ,etc The noun project crowd sourced “iconathon”
  94. 94. New Storytelling for the Internet’s DIGITAL NATIVES We are all storytellers. Our online lives read like extended mediation on experiencing life today.. Narratives inked not by linear narrative, but as fragments- reflecting our multiple lives today. . Linked themes or connections- travel, identity, ambitions, fears – presence. What binds these pieces together is our way of seeing & of trying to make sense of what is seen. . it would be a mistake to try to puzzle out a plot that remains always slightly submerged here. What matters is how we see – and therefore ‘make sense’ of our world with our very visual online presence.
  95. 95. We occupy different worlds and behave differently with different people, in different moments, at different times and different that world -
  96. 96. Creating connections: # iftar #Ramadan Problems: Fosters sense of community across Muslim and non-Muslim groups: e.g Memes raise awarenss of Ramadan fasting in the wider population – such as a meme tagged "OMG you fast for 30 days straight? don't you die?". Non- Muslims have also joined in with their own funny tribulations of Ramadan, such as: "Trying to eat a massive meal before you meet your Muslim friends so you don't get hungry while you're with them".
  97. 97. e.g. Humans of New York New forms of Story xxx “We understand each entry as something snatched from right here, from someplace culturally adjacent, if not identical, to the watcher’s world; there’s a sense (and, given Stanton’s apparent tirelessness, a corresponding reality) that this could just as easily be you, today, beaming out from the open windowpane of someone else’s news feed. {new yorker}

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