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Product Design Strategy UXLX 2018 (Public Version)

When considering what makes a great product designer we often make the mistake of lumping a wide range of skills under one role. This might make writing a job description easier but it makes it harder to focus on what needs to be done and how to get the best out of product design roles. Identifying the right skills for the right role, and aligning that with the product vision is of critical importance. In this workshop, we’ll be focusing on the day to day skills a designer needs to have to address the challenges in a world of ever-evolving products.

What activities will you be participating in during this workshop?

- Explore the evolving role of the product designer.
- Understanding where your company sits on the product design and digital evolution scale, and what this means for you.
- Learn how high-performing product teams align their product vision, strategy and priorities to deliver results.
- Develop a model to reliably select the right priorities and metrics to measure the performance of your product design
- Understanding how to use customer feedback to drive results and unblock obstacles.
- Learn how to work with others on your team to navigate through the inevitable challenge of change.

What will you take away from this workshop?
Lifelong skills in understanding product design and how it fits into an organization. Flexible and versatile models for managing your path through fast-changing organizations and dynamic product environments. Product design management skills to build a stronger team whether you’re an individual contributor or a team leader. The knowledge that will help you find a better fit, or better role, in your current or future organization.

Product Design Strategy UXLX 2018 (Public Version)

  1. 1. Product Design Strategy Richard Banfield Spring 2018
  2. 2. welcome
  3. 3. Why We’re Here Prologue
  4. 4. Product organizations still use features and plans as a substitute for coherent product strategy. This is causing frustration for product teams and confusion for customers. Problem
  5. 5. Customers want experiences, not features. We believe that aligning and structuring teams around customer’s experiences results in a healthier product organization. Hypothesis
  6. 6. What activities will you be participating in during this workshop?
  7. 7. Explore the evolving role of product designer. 1. team
  8. 8. Understanding where your company sits on the product and digital evolution scale, and what this means for you. 2.
  9. 9. Learn how high-performing product teams align their product vision, strategy and priorities to deliver results. 3.
  10. 10. Develop a model to reliably select the right priorities and metrics to measure the performance of your product design. 4.
  11. 11. Understanding how to use customer feedback to drive results and unblock obstacles. 5.
  12. 12. Learn how to work with others on your team to navigate through the inevitable challenge of change. 6.
  13. 13. You will leave with a greater understanding of your value, your role and your influence in the product organization. Outcome
  14. 14. Context Chapter One
  15. 15. User experience design.
  16. 16. BOS
  17. 17. EXPERIENCES ONE YEAR 61 MAJOR EXPERIENCES
  18. 18. “…not around process but rather organizing humans in a way that allows us all the opportunity to remain adaptable in a changing environment” NATE WALKINGSHAW
  19. 19. TRUST
  20. 20. The key insight from interviewing hundreds of companies: You can’t create product leadership from the bottom up.
  21. 21. The Product Organization Chapter Two
  22. 22. “Top-down, command-and-control organizations with billions of dollars and thousands of employees are getting their butts kicked by small, agile teams with only a handful of employees, informal org structures and very little resources.” True or False?
  23. 23. “Top-down, command-and-control organizations with billions of dollars and thousands of employees are getting their butts kicked by small, agile teams with only a handful of employees, informal org structures and very little resources.” True or False?
  24. 24. The randomness of hand-crafting products was replaced by a predictable approach. Factories full of unskilled workers could start making things with greater scale, frequency and precision. Command Model
  25. 25. Command Model
  26. 26.  Individual skills networked into a cross- functional group yield fast results. The networked arrangement of teams makes it easy to replace lost members or continue without any supervision. Team Model
  27. 27. Team Model
  28. 28. Do the advantages of the small unit disappear when you grow? Can Teams Scale? 6 minutes
  29. 29. Can Product Teams Scale?
  30. 30.  Individual skills networked into a cross- functional group yield fast results. The networked arrangement of teams makes it easy to replace lost members or continue without any supervision. Team Model
  31. 31. Command vs. Team Commands set clear ‘North Star’ goals. Optimization of assets, accountability, long-term planning and the development of talent. Teams and small units are unmatched for their agility of performance, their ability to make non- linear decisions and innovate on the fly.
  32. 32. Mutually Exclusive?
  33. 33. The Hybrid Organization Chapter Three
  34. 34. Combines the best of the top-down organization with the agility of the team model. Hybrid Model
  35. 35. Strategic Ops Product Ops Tactical Ops
  36. 36. Executive Product Leadership Product Experience Teams
  37. 37. Executive Product Leadership Product Experience Teams
  38. 38. Working on your own, list the assumptions and facts you have about your product team and organization. One item per Post-it. Instructions 6 minutes
  39. 39. Assumptions are statements, communicated as if they are facts but have no evidence to support them. Assumptions
  40. 40. Instructions Facts Assumptions
  41. 41. Which assumptions about our teams and organizations are clouding our judgement or making it harder to make changes? What Can Hurt Us? 10 minutes
  42. 42. The Stages of Learning Chapter Four
  43. 43. Stages of Learning Unconscious Incompetent Conscious Incompetent Conscious Competent Unconscious Competent Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 We don’t know what we don’t know. Bliss! We know what we don’t know. Panic! We have a process but it’s still an effort to produce quality. We do the right thing without thinking about it. Source: Noel Burch
  44. 44. Stages of “UX” Learning Unconscious Incompetent Conscious Incompetent Conscious Competent Unconscious Competent Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 Occasional UX or innovation projects. No dedicated internal teams. No metrics. Silos of internal UX & innovation teams. Seeing positive ROI on small projects. Integrated, cross-functional teams. Fluent in UX. Measuring ROI against strategic goals. Adapted by: Jared Spool No customer focused vision or resources. Focus is on business and IT only.
  45. 45. Where on the continuum of learning is your organization? Evaluate 2 minutes
  46. 46. Unconscious Incompetent Conscious Incompetent Conscious Competent Unconscious Competent Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4
  47. 47. Where on the continuum of learning is your team? Evaluate 2 minutes
  48. 48. Unconscious Incompetent Conscious Incompetent Conscious Competent Unconscious Competent Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 This might be the CEO
  49. 49. Where on the continuum of learning are you? Assess 2 minutes
  50. 50. Unconscious Incompetent Conscious Incompetent Conscious Competent Unconscious Competent Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 How do you go from here to here?
  51. 51. Unconscious Incompetent Conscious Incompetent Conscious Competent Unconscious Competent Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4
  52. 52. What examples have you seen where teams or companies have moved from one stage to the next stage? Real World 10 minutes
  53. 53. Vision & Strategy Chapter Five
  54. 54. Write down your company’s mission and vision. Mission & Vision 3 minutes
  55. 55. A mission is essential but insufficient. For teams to be effective they need ownership over the product level vision and implementation of that vision. Mission vs. Product Vision
  56. 56. HOW? CREATING PROGRESS THROUGH TECHNOLOGY THAT LIFTS THE HUMAN CONDITION.
  57. 57. TO ACCELERATE THE WORLD’S TRANSITION TO SUSTAINABLE ENERGY.
  58. 58. WTF?!?
  59. 59. “We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills”
  60. 60. Having an unattainable or aspirational mission is very important. Having a very tangible vision is the opposite. It must be something you can almost see. Mission vs. Vision
  61. 61. Good Product Vision Objective Future Problem Shared Concrete Timeless It’s not about you. Describes a better world. Focuses on pain points. Relevant to customers and teams. Clear end state. Agnostic of temp tech and trends.
  62. 62. Product Vision Today, when __________________ want to ________________, they have to _________________. This is unacceptable because ____________________. We envision a world where _____________________. We’re bringing this world about through ____________. identified group desirable outcome current option(s) shortcomings of option(s) shortcomings are resolved approach
  63. 63. Today, when the sick, pregnant, dying and disabled, want to have a successful birth, care, treatment and support, they have to, get insurance, follow the rules and protocols, find providers that are covered and accessible, and find a way to apply the diagnosis, while finding transportation, time off work, etc. This is unacceptable because it is costly, disruptive and frequently harmful. We envision a world where issues are predicted, interventions are delivered where the patient is in control, there are fewer mistakes, fewer misses and less harm, and problems are prevented and health promoted. We’re bringing this world about by designing new business models and market places, aggregating analysis and acting on information, which closes the loop on better prediction and adjustments. Example
  64. 64. Write a Product Vision to guide your product team as it exists today. Instructions 10 minutes
  65. 65. Product Vision Today, when __________________ want to ________________, they have to _________________. This is unacceptable because ____________________. We envision a world where _____________________. We’re bringing this world about through ____________. identified group desirable outcome current option(s) shortcomings of option(s) shortcomings are resolved approach
  66. 66. Write a Product Vision to guide your product team without any of the constraints you experience today. Instructions 10 minutes
  67. 67. Product Vision Today, when __________________ want to ________________, they have to _________________. This is unacceptable because ____________________. We envision a world where _____________________. We’re bringing this world about through ____________. identified group desirable outcome current option(s) shortcomings of option(s) shortcomings are resolved approach
  68. 68. Combine the best of these Product Visions into a single Product Vision. Instructions 6 minutes
  69. 69. Product Vision Today, when __________________ want to ________________, they have to _________________. This is unacceptable because ____________________. We envision a world where _____________________. We’re bringing this world about through ____________. customer segment desirable outcome current option(s) shortcomings of option(s) shortcomings are resolved approach
  70. 70. Executive Product Leadership Product Experience Teams
  71. 71. Product Vision can come from senior leadership, but ownership, implementation and the ability to change the vision stays at the team level. Who Owns Vision?
  72. 72. Mission Product Vision & Strategy Values & Metrics ?? 1
  73. 73. Mission Product Vision & Strategy Values & Metrics 2
  74. 74. Structure As Strategy Chapter Six
  75. 75. A fancy way of saying, “This is how we will behave everyday in order to achieve the vision we have agreed to, even when things don’t go as planned”. What Is Strategy?
  76. 76. How we behave and adapt is a function of our group structure and our understanding of our situation. Structured For Adaption
  77. 77. MOMENTUM TIME “THIS IS GOING TO BE GREAT.” “WHOA, THAT TOOK MUCH LONGER THAN EXPECTED” “NOBODY SAID IT WOULD BE THIS HARD” “HANG ON, THIS ISN’T RIGHT.” SCOTT BELSKY
  78. 78. MOMENTUM TIME SCOTT BELSKY “THIS IS GOING TO BE GREAT.” “WHOA, THAT TOOK MUCH LONGER THAN EXPECTED” “NOBODY SAID IT WOULD BE THIS HARD” “CRAP” “PHEW!” “WHAT NOW?” “YASS!” “WTF!” “$$$!” “SERIOUSLY??” “HANG ON, THIS ISN’T RIGHT.”
  79. 79. MOMENTUM TIME “THIS IS GOING TO BE GREAT.” “NOBODY SAID IT WOULD BE THIS HARD” “HANG ON, THIS ISN’T RIGHT.” “THINGS DIDN’T GO AS PLANNED”
  80. 80. MOMENTUM TIME VISION
  81. 81. MOMENTUM TIME STRATEGY VISION
  82. 82. Strategy: Structure + Understanding Real Customer Pain Points Experience Design Capabilities Logistics
  83. 83. The Product Strategy Chapter Eight
  84. 84. The Big Questions Real Pain Points: What are we solving? Design the Experience: What’s the product? Capabilities: Why can we deliver on this? Logistics: How do we get it into their hands?
  85. 85. What validated problems will your product solve for your customers? Instructions 4 minutes
  86. 86. What will be the most important touch points, the emotional journey and brand promise of your product experience? Instructions 8 minutes
  87. 87. What do you have that makes you ideal to create this product? What tech, expertise, partnerships exist? What’s missing? Instructions 8 minutes
  88. 88. How will your product experience find its way to your customers? How will you support that? Who pays for it, and how? Instructions 8 minutes
  89. 89. The Risks What are the obstacles to product success? These are Tech/Ops, Legal/Regulatory, Financial, Personnel and Stakeholder risks. In other words, can we sustain this product?
  90. 90. Assembling The Parts Map the Real Pain Points, Design, Capabilities and Logistics against the greatest risks. This requires us doing two things: Developing a Sustainability Statement and Mapping the risks against our Product Vision.
  91. 91. Sustainability Currently, the greatest risk to our product’s existent is that ______________ . If this happens, we won’t be able to continue because ________________. This will most likely come true if _________________. Factors that help us mitigate that risk are ____________________. consequences of risk factors that amplify risk factors that decrease risk greatest risk
  92. 92. Sustainability Good vision fit but likely unsustainable Good vision fit and sustainable Poor vision fit & unsustainable Building vision debt but sustainable
  93. 93. Write your own sustainability statement. Instructions 8 minutes
  94. 94. Sustainability Currently, the greatest risk to our product’s existent is that ______________ . If this happens, we won’t be able to continue because ________________. This will most likely come true if _________________. Factors that help us mitigate that risk are ____________________. consequences of risk factors that amplify risk factors that decrease risk greatest risk
  95. 95. Review all the elements of the Real Pain Points, Design, Capabilities and Logistics, so you can map them against the risk. Instructions 8 Minutes
  96. 96. Sustainability Good vision fit but likely unsustainable Good vision fit and sustainable Poor vision fit & unsustainable Building vision debt but sustainable
  97. 97. A Better Human Interface Chapter Seven
  98. 98. People Before Process MEN WANTED for hazardous journey, small wages, bitter cold, long months of complete darkness, constant danger, safe return doubtful, honor and recognition in case of success. Ernest Shackleton 4 Burlington st.
  99. 99. Ultimate Empathy Collective consciousness, collective conscience, or collective conscious is the set of shared beliefs, ideas and moral attitudes which operate as a unifying force within an organization.
  100. 100. Structured For Speed
  101. 101. Product Experience Team Walkingshaw created autonomous cross- functional, co-located teams, which they call, Product Experience Teams, they were able to develop an environment where the teams would have power over their actions as they stepped towards that bigger mission.
  102. 102. Product Experience Team
  103. 103. Engineer Domain Expert Researcher Developer Product Manager UI Designer UX Strategist Product Experience Team
  104. 104. Seek a high degree of diversity in skills, background and experience. Why? It generates “creative tension”. Easier to identify weaknesses and assess skills. Faster decision making. More velocity. Team Diversity
  105. 105. Silos vs. PXTs
  106. 106. Silos vs. PXTs Mutually exclusive and collectively exhaustive Imperfect but shared
  107. 107. Product Experience Team Domain Expert
  108. 108. Guides & Guardrails Vision Strategy Priorities Metrics Values Behavior
  109. 109. Vision Strategy Priorities Metrics Values Behavior “Why are we doing this?” “What do we need to do to achieve that?” “What do we do first?” “How do we know we’re being successful?” “What agreements make us better?” “What actions demonstrate understanding?” Guides & Guardrails
  110. 110. MOMENTUM TIME STRATEGY VISION
  111. 111. Values KNOW EACH OTHER’S WORLD LIVE IN REALITY EMBRACE SCIENTIFIC THINKING LEAD WITH HUMILITY BE VULNERABLE RESPECT EACH OTHER
  112. 112. Product Vision Product Strategy Priorities Metrics Values Behavior Mission Vision
  113. 113. Product Vision Product Strategy Priorities Metrics Values Behavior Mission Vision
  114. 114. Product Strategy Priorities Metrics Mission Vision
  115. 115. Product Vision Product Strategy Priorities Metrics Values Behavior Mission Vision 1
  116. 116. Product Vision Product Strategy Priorities Metrics Values Behavior Mission Vision 1 2
  117. 117. Shared Consciousness Intraday Daily Weekly Quarterly Company Wide Executive Leaders Product Leaders Product Team Slack & email Slack & email Co-located, Slack & email Team Stand-ups Task Team + Slack & email Lunches & Town Halls Experience Team Meeting CPO + CEO Demo Day All Hands Meeting Offsite Offsite Offsite Co-located, Slack & email Co-located, Slack & email Co-located, Slack & email
  118. 118. Design a calendar of communication for your team and company that would increase shared consciousness. Instructions 8 minutes
  119. 119. Work with your team to develop a set of values and establish a shared language for how to describe frequently occurring problems and bottlenecks. Homework On your own time
  120. 120. Connecting The Dots Chapter Nine
  121. 121. Alignment is not a new idea. Strategic visions are not new. Team structures are not new. What’s new is that product teams are taking ownership of their vision and execution, which gets them better support for resource requests from the larger org. Groundbreaking?
  122. 122. Engineer Domain Expert Researcher Developer Product Manager UI Designer UX Strategist Product Experience Team
  123. 123. Product Vision Today, when __________________ want to ________________, they have to _________________. This is unacceptable because ____________________. We envision a world where _____________________. We’re bringing this world about through ____________. customer segment desirable outcome current option(s) shortcomings of option(s) shortcomings are resolved approach
  124. 124. Product Strategy Vision Strategy Priorities Metrics Values Behavior “Why are we doing this?” “What do we need to do to achieve that?” “What do we do first?” “How do we know we’re being successful?” “What agreements make us better?” “What actions demonstrate understanding?”
  125. 125. MOMENTUM TIME STRATEGY VISION
  126. 126. CUSTOMER SEGMENT PRODUCT CONTENT EXPERIENCE GEOGRAPHY CHANNEL VALUE CHAIN NEW BUSINESS MILITARY GOVERNMENT HEALTHCARE EDUCATION BUSINESS CHANNELS ASSESSMENTS ANALYTICS DASHBOARD COURSES NOVICE PROFICIENT PRO VETERAN LEGEND WWWMARKET3RD PARTYSOCIAL INTERNAL
  127. 127. CUSTOMER SEGMENT PRODUCT CONTENT EXPERIENCE GEOGRAPHY CHANNEL VALUE CHAIN NEW BUSINESS MILITARY GOVERNMENT HEALTHCARE EDUCATION BUSINESS CHANNELS ASSESSMENTS ANALYTICS DASHBOARD COURSES NOVICE PROFICIENT PRO VETERAN LEGEND WWWMARKET3RD PARTYSOCIAL INTERNAL
  128. 128. Team Now Next Later Integrated Roadmap Initiatives
  129. 129. Group the strategic items in the sustainability matrix under initiatives and assign to responsible team members. Homework On your own time
  130. 130. Unconscious Incompetent Conscious Incompetent Conscious Competent Unconscious Competent Product Vision Product Strategy Priorities Metrics None or Company Mission Obsessive Sales Disorder None or Reactive Dept. P&L Product Focused Scrum-Theatre Rigid Strategy Service or Product P&L Problem Centered Thematic Roadmap Aligned with Capabilities Unit Economics Customer Focused Seamless Feedback Integration Universally Integrated Hypothesis Driven Metrics Stage 4Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage vs. Strategy
  131. 131. Analyze where you, your team and your organization are on the learning continuum and design an appropriate learning strategy. Homework On your own time
  132. 132. Activities Hypotheses Key Metrics Lessons Execution Roadmap Milestones Now Next Later
  133. 133. With your team, decide the actions to be taken, the expected results, how you’ll measure and learn from the result. Homework On your own time
  134. 134. MARTIN ERIKSSON “It’s not the steps, it’s the mindset”
  135. 135. Radical Product
  136. 136. richard@freshtilledsoil.com @rmbanfield @freshtilledsoil #designsprint
  137. 137. richard@freshtilledsoil.com @rmbanfield www.productleadershipbook.com www.radicalproduct.com thank you

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